Author: AOML Communications

New study finds a potential predictor for long-range US tornado forecasts

Tornadoes are among the deadliest and costliest natural disasters in the United States and are one of the hardest to predict. In December 2021, the most destructive winter tornado outbreak, known as the Quad-State Tornado Outbreak, caused 89 fatalities, 672 injuries, and at least $3.9 billion in property damages. Scientists at the University of Miami’s Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) and NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) investigated this outbreak and found that it occurred under an exceptionally strong and prolonged negative Pacific-North American (PNA) pattern, which created favorable conditions for tornado outbreaks.

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Unveiling the innovative advancements in hurricane modeling

With an active hurricane season on the horizon, the need for reliable hurricane forecasting is at the forefront of our minds. Heightened sea surface temperatures, weakened vertical wind shear, and an enhanced West African monsoon are expected to contribute to the development of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic. To predict these developing storms, meteorologists employ models that rely on current observations and mathematical calculations to predict a storm’s behavior and track. These models are complex and utilize inputs from a variety of sources including historic, numeric, oceanic, and atmospheric data to generate their predictions. 

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Investigating the impacts of climate change on reef-building corals using robotic arms 

Blue lights fill the room. The faint smell of salt emanates throughout the space as wires and tubes intricately suspended over robotic arms move along custom-built tracks over four rows of tanks filled with seawater – and fragments of critically-endangered corals. In the Experimental Reef Lab, scientists at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) are investigating how crucial reef-building coral species are affected by the impacts of climate change using a suite of open-source robotic arms designed and built at AOML.

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Crossing the Equator and Navigating Icebergs: The A13.5 GO-SHIP Returns After 52 Days At Sea 

Wind, waves, and icebergs pierced through morning fog – the A13.5 GO-SHIP cruise proved both tumultuous and rewarding with vast amounts of new data that bring the promise of groundbreaking future research. After 52 days at sea, the A13.5 GO-SHIP cruise (short for “Global Ocean Ship-based Hydrographical Investigations Program”) returned to Cape Town, South Africa […]

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The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation is weakening in the deep sea of the North Atlantic Ocean, study finds

Just in! A new study, which analyzed mooring observations and hydrographic data, found the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) abyssal limb in the North Atlantic has weakened over the past two decades contributing to sea level rise in the region. 

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