Tag: Western Boundary Time Series

Pods Away! New Autonomous Data Pods Will Provide Low-Cost, Reliable Data Retrieval

AOML is preparing to deploy two autonomous data pod systems with Pressure Inverted Echo Sounders near the eastern boundary of the North Atlantic during March 2020.  This will be the first full scale operational deployment of data pods, with a goal of providing a low-cost solution for the sustained Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation monitoring without the continuous use of a research vessel. 

Read More

October 2015 Western Boundary Time Series Cruise

AOML oceanographers are participating in a joint research cruise to study the Meridional Overturning Circulation onboard the R/V Endeavor during October 3-20. The team will sail from Fort Lauderdale, FL to collect roughly 55 full-depth conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles in the Florida Current and the Deep Western Boundary Current east of the Bahamas. The scientists will also work with their partners from the University of Miami to recover, redeploy, and maintain three tall moorings and nine smaller moored instruments during this cruise in support of the NOAA Western Boundary Time Series project and its partner National Science Foundation project.

Read More

100th Successful Dropsonde Cruise for the Western Boundary Time Series Project

In October, AOML scientists, technicians and engineers involved in the Western Boundary Time Series (WBTS) project completed the 100th successful dropsonde cruise in the Florida Current since the project’s inception in 2000. The dropsonde cruises measure volume transport in the Florida Current using an out-of-service telephone cable between Florida and Grand Bahama Island.

Read More

February 2015 Western Boundary Time Series Cruise

AOML physical oceanographers Molly Baringer, Ulises Rivero, Pedro Pena, Andrew Stefanick, Grant Rawson, Jay Hooper and Francis Bringas conducted a Western Boundary Times Series cruise aboard the UNOLS R/V Endeavor on February 15, 2015. Molly Baringer, AOML Deputy Director, served as chief scientist and was supported by additional crew from the University of Puerto Rico. Scientists measured full water column values of salinity, temperature, and oxygen. Scientists also telemetered data from a series of moorings along the 26th north parallel for a joint NOAA and National Science Foundation program designed to monitor the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation current. Francis Bringas also conducted a fall rate experiment that consisted of deploying 200 XBTs from different launch heights.

Read More