On August 21st, 2017, the entire nation celebrated a unique celestial event: the first total solar eclipse to cross the contiguous United States in 99 years. This extraordinary visual experience was captured through many different lenses here at our laboratory. While AOML’s Miami location was not on the path of totality, we were still fortunate enough to see roughly 80% of the solar eclipse, through a number of both high-tech and homemade viewing tools.

Photo credit: NOAA

  • AOML Scientists use binoculars to reflect the sun onto the pavement. Image credit: NOAA
  • Hurricane scientist Neal Dorst sits with an array of solar eclipse viewing tools. Image credit: NOAA
  • Oceanographer Claudia Schmid captures the solar eclipse from AOML. Image credit: NOAA
  • Hurricane scientist Mu-Chieh

Image Captions

From Left:

  1. AOML Scientists use binoculars to reflect the sun onto the pavement. Image credit: NOAA
  2. Hurricane scientist Neal Dorst sits with an array of solar eclipse viewing tools. Image credit: NOAA
  3. Oceanographer Claudia Schmid captures the solar eclipse from AOML. Image credit: NOAA
  4. Hurricane scientist Mu-Chieh ‘Laura’ Ko captures the beautiful phases of the solar eclipse from AOML. Image credit: NOAA