AOML's Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division


OCED News

November 26, 2018

Meetings

● The NOAA Senior Research Council will be meeting in the AOML library on Tuesday and Wednesday, November 27 and 28.

● On Wednesday, November 28 there will be an all hands ‘omics meeting with Libby Jewett, the program manager for ‘omics. It will take place in the first floor conference room from 1-4pm. All ‘omics PIs should plan to attend. Formal presentations are not desired, but you may show a slide or two if it helps communicate your message. Please be prepared to discuss:

   Progress on the milestones and deliverables listed in both FY18 and prior statements of work. Written
   highlights are strongly encouraged, particularly for FY16 and FY17 statements of work.

   Plans and ideas for FY19 and beyond. Keep in mind that only federal employees can be present if you
   wish to discuss pre-decisional specifics.

Field Work

● Ian Smith, Kelly Montenero, Dr. Chris Kelble, and Charline Quenee will be conducting a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on November 27-30. This will complete this year’s field sampling for the project that assesses and evaluates the impacts of Everglades Restoration Projects on the valuable sportfish populations of Florida Bay.

November 19, 2018

Meetings

● Dr. Ian Enochs gave a presentation to NOAA's Ocean Acidification Working Group on Subsurface Automated Samplers that he developed in collaboration with Nate Formel. Further information on the use and construction of the samplers can be found at https://www.coral.noaa.gov/accrete/sas/.

Review Panels

● Dr. Chris Kelble has been selected to serve as a reviewer for the "Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region" competition that just closed. The proposed CI will serve a critical function at the juncture of the interdependent global and regional observing systems in the North Atlantic Ocean and those of the Northeast U.S. Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NEUS LME). In so doing, the Institute will link basin-scale climate observations to ecosystem-scale monitoring, assessments, and decision making. Broad scale climate observations will also be integrated into the Global Ocean Observation System. . The intent of this CI is to expand and improve our ability to collect, deliver, and use ocean information to study the effect of climate change on various spatial scales including regions, LMEs, and the Nation.

Field Work

● Ian Smith, Kelly Montenero, Chris Kelble, and Charline Quenee will be conducting a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on November 27-30. This will complete this year’s field sampling for the project that assesses and evaluates the impacts of Everglades Restoration Projects on the valuable sportfish populations of Florida Bay.

November 13, 2018

Meetings

● Kelly Montenero will attend the Sanctuary Advisory Committee meeting of Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and meet with colleagues there to discuss applying the IEA approach to Sanctuary Condition Reports on November 14-17.

Field Work

● Dr. Denis Pierrot will be taking various samples and test the newly installed pCO2 system on board the M/V Selfoss. Denis will be sailing between Reykjavic, Iceland and Portland, ME on a 10-day transit across the North Atlantic as part of a collaboration with LOCEAN in France and the Marine Institute in Iceland.

Announcements

Climate.gov has published a piece on their homepage on Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk’s article "Opposite latitudinal gradients in projected ocean acidification and bleaching impacts on coral reefs”. It shows how ocean warming will drive corals to the poles, but ocean acidification works in the opposite direction leaving little space for corals if we don’t curb our emissions. It is a feature on the climate.gov homepage:
https://www.climate.gov/news-features/featured-images/no-safe-haven-coral-combined-impacts-warming-and-ocean-acidification

● NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program has just launched it’s new website and is requesting your feedback. Our goal with this website is to provide our scientists, management partners, stakeholders, and others with an understanding of what an Integrated Ecosystem Assessment is, where and how they are currently being implemented, and other ecosystem science needed to make informed decisions. As an important partner in our work, we are requesting that you take just a few minutes to review the website and fill out this form. Your feedback will help us improve the quality of the IEA website and allow you to easily find and understand the information you need. We hope to collect all feedback before the end of November. We thank you for your time and look forward to your feedback.
IEA website: https://www.integratedecosystemassessment.noaa.gov/
Review form:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf2jQwxl27oI_AlDtKnZe9JBGZho7arqkPETNnX50e8XsB9rA/viewform?usp=sf_link

November 5, 2018

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley from the AOML Environmental Microbiology Program will participate in the Florida Department of Environmental Protection CRCP Water Quality Monitoring Plan review on Thursday November 8, 2018 at the Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center. The NOAA-CRCP water quality program has recently concluded 24 months of sampling at Government Cut and the St. Lucie Inlet and 12 months of sampling the seven inlets in between. Thus, it is time to review results and update the monitoring plan, as needed. The participants of this workshop from a range of institutions including FDEP, NOAA-CRCP, NOAA AOML, USGS, NSU, FIU, Broward County, and other federal, state, local, and academic partners will review the last 24 months of this program and provide advice on planing the future coastal water quality monitoring activities of this program in South Florida.

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin will serve on a listening session to solicit stakeholder input regarding implementation of the Department of Commerce 2018-2022 Strategic Plan and NOAA’s "blue economy" interests including advancing innovation, strengthening domestic commerce, and increasing U.S. exports. RDML Timothy Gallaudet, PhD, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, will discuss opportunities to improve the efficiency of U.S. ports, promote domestic aquaculture production, and expand exploration of the nation's Exclusive Economic Zone. Open questions from the public will follow a roundtable discussion moderated by Margaret Leinen, Director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Goodwin will join the following panelists: Robert Dooley, Commercial Fishing - Pacific Fisheries Management Council; Don Kent, Hubbs Seaworld Research Institute; Dr. Eric Terrill, Scripps; a representative, Port of San Diego) at the Broadway Pier in San Diego on November 9, 2018.

● On November 6, 2018 while in San Diego for Blue Tech week, Craig McLean (OAR Assistant Administrator and Acting Chief Scientist) and staff met with Kelly Goodwin, Toby Garfield (Acting Deputy Director of SWFSC), and Commander John Crofts at SWFSC. Discussion topics were broad and included recent saildrone missions and progress on the 'omics roadmap, which is due to the NOAA Research Council in the beginning of December.

● On November 8, Luke Thompson will give a webinar for the International Microbiome and Metagenomics Standards Alliance entitled "Standards-enabled metagenomics and metabolomics of Earth’s microbial communities".

● Kelly Montenero will give a presentation at the National Marine Sanctuary Research Coordinators meeting on November 8th at Mote Marine Lab on Summerland Key. The presentation discussed collaboration between NOAA’s IEA program, the Sanctuary system and the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network.

Manuscripts

● The paper entitled "Why more comparative approaches are required in time-series analyses of coral reef ecosystems" with AOML/OCED co-author Dr. Derek Manzello was accepted for publication in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series. Using sites in Mo’orea and Panama as examples of resilient reefs that have been studied over 35 years, this paper demonstrates the potential of the comparative approach by exploring different ecological drivers of community resilience at each location. In both cases, coral reef community resilience is associated with strong herbivory, but in Mo’orea, resilience is a product of rapid coral community recovery through sexual recruitment in response to a largely indiscriminate disturbance (Crown-of-Thorns starfish predation), while in Panama, resilience appears to be a product of corals acquiring resistance to a repetitive selective disturbance (bleaching). Based on these trends, a hypothesis-driven conceptual framework is proposed to test for mechanisms driving community resilience. The recent decade of coral reef degradation has brough time-series analyses to the forefront of research on these systems, where they are detecting disturbances that are unique to modern ecological science.

● Edmunds P, Adam T, Baker A, Doo S, Glynn PW, Manzello DP, Silbiger N, Smith T, Fong P (2018) Why more comparative approaches are required in time-series analyses of coral reef ecosystems. Marine Ecology Progress Series. In Press.

● The paper entitled "Functionally profiling metagenomes and metatranscriptomes at species-level resolution" with AOML/OCED co-author Dr. Luke Thompson was accepted for publication in the journal Nature Methods. This paper presents a tool called HUMAnN2, which allows for species-level resolution of functional profiles of metagenomes. For this paper, Luke used HUMAnN2 to profile and reveal patterns in marine metagenomes from depth profiles in the Red Sea, which Luke collected back in 2011.

● Franzosa, E.A., L.J. McIver, G. Rahnavard, L.R. Thompson, M. Schirmer, G. Weingart, K. Schwarzberg-Lipson, R. Knight, J.G. Caporaso, N. Segata, and C. Huttenhower. Functionally profiling metagenomes and metatranscriptomes at species-level resolution. Nature Methods, 15(11):962-968 (doi:10.1038/s41592-018-0176-y) (2018).

Field Work

● Ian Smith will be going out to sample the hypoxic area and red tide off of Charlotte Harbor on November 8 with a commercial fishermen. Ian will investigate whether the sub-surface bloom and hypoxia we first documented on last month’s cruise still persist. This will also hopefully be the beginning of a new collaboration with private industry, where we hope to have commercial fisherman collecting data for us routinely when they go out fishing in these areas.

October 29, 2018

Meetings

● On November 8, Dr. Luke Thompson will present a webinar for the International Microbiome and Metagenomics Standards Alliance entitled "Standards-enabled metagenomics and metabolomics of Earth’s microbial communities".

● Dr. Leticia Barbero will be in Vienna, Austria from October 29th to November 2nd to participate in a workshop organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Division of Latin America and the Caribbean, Department of Technical Cooperation. The purpose of the workshop is to design a regional project in the area of marine environment to strengthen capacities in marine and coastal management, including ocean acidification monitoring, for the participating countries.

Field Work

● Dr. Lew Gramer, Dr. Mana Amornthammarong (both CIMAS), and Joe Bishop built 44 low-cost, high-precision thermistor instrument packages. This week, they worked with CIMAS field scientists at SEFSC - Dana Williams, Allan Bright, Annabeth Peterson, and MPS intern Samara Neufeld - to deploy all 44 thermistors together with 12 Tilt Current Meters, at four reef sites stretching across 33 km of the Upper Florida Keys. The deployments were made using a NOAA SEFSC Small boat. The reef sites are reef restoration sites restored by Coral Restoration Foundation with funding from the NOAA Coral Restoration Center and that this project builds on a multi-year collaboration with CRF. These instruments will measure very fine-scale structure in near-bottom sea temperature and ocean currents, to inform analysis of coral outplant transcriptomes and microbiomes to be collected at the sites (Rosales et al. 'Omics 2019).

October 22, 2018

Meetings

● Dr. Catalina Aguilar and Dr. Stephanie Rosales will be attending the "Third Global Invertebrate Alliance Research Conference and Workshop (GIGA III)" in Curacao, October 19-21, GIGA is a collaborative network of scientist studying invertebrate animal genomics. Catalina will give a presentation entitled "Understanding heat stress resistance in Orbicella faveolata from the Florida Keys using gene networks analyses".

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley will be attending the 10th Annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit in Miami Beach October 24-25th. This summit is held annually on behalf of the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, to give the public and local leaders the opportunity to learn more about climate change issues and how they affect Southeast Florida. The Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, is a partnership between Broward, Miami-Dade, Monroe and Palm Beach counties, to collaborate and coordinate action and resilience policy and action across the four county lines. Maribeth will be participating in a roundtable discussion on the impacts of sea level rise on the health and well-being of coastal communities.

Manuscripts

● Dr. Ruben van hooidonk co-authored a manuscript entitled "Designating spatial priorities for marine biodiversity conservation in the Coral Triangle" that has been accepted in the journal, Frontiers in Marine Science. The paper analyzes current MPAs in the Coral Triangle (CT) to assess if the MPAs are representative of all aspects of biodiversity, including populations, species, and biogenic habitats. It used conservation planning software (Zonation) as a decision-support tool to plan MPAs that would maximize representation of biodiversity features while balancing selection of protected areas based on the likelihood of threats. The results indicate that the average representation of biodiversity features within the existing MPA system is currently about 5%. By increasing MPA coverage from 2% to 10% of the total area of the CT, the average representation of biodiversity features within the MPA system would increase to over 37%. This study demonstrates that the application of design tools, instead of ad hoc approaches, can support the design of a comprehensive MPA network that includes a representative range of biodiversity. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00400/abstract

● Asaad, I, CJ Lundquist, MV Erdmann, R Van Hooidonk, MJ Costello. Designating spatial priorities for marine biodiversity conservation in the Coral Triangle. In Press. Frontiers in Marine Science.

Field Work

● Dr. Lew Gramer (CIMAS) will be working with collaborators from NOAA SEFSC to deploy dense networks of innovative oceanographic instruments at four reef sites in the upper Florida Keys. The instruments are measuring near-bottom sea temperature and ocean currents at high spatial resolution as part of an interdisciplinary study on disease transmission and resistance among coral outplants. The year-long study is being undertaken with RSMAS and the Coral Restoration Foundation, and is funded by the NOAA 'Omics Initiative.

Report

● Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk is the second author on the UNESCO report "Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs". The report will be published in early September by UNESCO/World Heritage and will be available from the UNESCO website (as the First Assessment). It reports on heat stress in natural World Heritage properties during the third global coral bleaching event which took place on June 2014 through May 2017. It updates the first assessment with high-resolution future projection analysis under the RCP2.6 emissions scenario, in which emissions peak during the current decade (2010-2020) and achieve the limit of well below 2°C by 2100. This updated analysis provides understanding of the implications of meeting the long-term goal of the UNFCCC Paris Agreement for World Heritage-listed coral reefs. Under a CO2 emission business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5), all 29 World Heritage-listed coral reef properties are expected to experience annual severe bleaching this century, leading to dramatic deterioration in ecological functioning and decline in the quality and quantity of ecosystem services these reefs provide. When emissions follow the RCP2.6 scenario, no World Heritage-listed coral reefs would experience annual severe bleaching this century.

October 09, 2018

Meetings

● Dr. Kristen Harper will be visiting MBARI to develop 18s libraries for the recently completed September CalCOFI cruise.

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin and Dr. Kristen Harper will be attending the US-Norway bilateral on "eDNA analyses - a tool for quantitative assessments of marine ecosystems?" in Tromso, Norway on October 8-11. The workshop goals include establishing guidelines for inter-laboratory reproducibility and producing a white paper on eDNA use in fisheries stock assessments.

Seminar

● John Morris gave a student seminar at RSMAS entitled "Evaluating the response of microboring rates to ocean acidification." His research characterized dissolution rates of Caribbean coral reef frameworks under experimentally manipulated acidification scenarios. The study was conducted in the CIMAS Experimental Reef Lab and was funded by the Ocean Acidification Program.

Congressional Briefing

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin of AOML will join colleagues from NMFS (Cisco Werner) and NOS (Steve Thur) to brief staff from the Senate Appropriations Committee's Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies on NOAA's 'omics work.

Field Work

● Kelly Montenero, Dr. Chris Kelble, Ian Smith, and others will be participating in a R/V Walton Smith cruise from October 12-19. This is the next in the series of south Florida Ecosystem Restoration research cruises, but will be expanded to help sample the ongoing red tide on the southwest Florida Shelf. The focus will be on quantifying human health and ecosystem impacts from the red tide event with additional funding and collaboration from NOS HAB event response, NMFS/SEFSC, and the State of Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute.

October 01, 2018

Seminar

● On October 2, AOML will host Dr. Emily Jones from the Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems (CCME) at Florida A&M University. Dr. Jones will be presenting "Exploration of collaborative research topics in coastal ecology" on Tuesday at 10AM in the first floor conference room. Dr. Jones is visiting AOML, because she has to spend 6-12 months at a NOAA facility and wants to explore possible collaborations with AOML. If you would like to meet with Dr. Jones when she is here, please contact Dr. Chris Kelble.

Field Work

● Joe Bishop and Dr. Mana Amornthammarong are traveling with Albert Jones of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center, and John Halas of Environmental Moorings, Int., to finalize the installation of CREWS buoys in Grenada and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, September 24 - October 2. Once the data are transmitting, they will be available on the CHAMP Portal page at: www.coral.noaa.gov/champportal.

Outreach and Education

● Luke Thompson will teach Python For Data Analysis at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography from October 1 until December 5. You can follow along with the lectures and lessons, respectively, at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVZrIrWtcvTzYlrNx7RcDyg and https://github.com/cuttlefishh/python-for-data-analysis.

September 24, 2018

Meetings

● Dr. Denis Pierrot is attending a meeting on biogeochemistry data quality control at PMEL on Monday and Tuesday.

● Dr. Neda Trifonova is presenting at the 10th International Conference on Ecological Informatics in Jena, Germany this week. Her talk is entitled "Investigating climate impacts in the Gulf of Mexico with a dynamic Bayesian model."

● Dr. Jim Hendee visited Dr. Kelly Goodwin at the SWFSC September 20 and toured Weston Solutions (where Kelly helped design and develop their microbiological survey techniques under a CRADA agreement that lasted five years), the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), and Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Jim and Kelly met with post-docs Luke Thompson, Kirsten Harper and Dovi Kacev; and heard updates on their various projects. At JCVI, they had discussions with Andy Allen about his work in diatom genetics and about possibilities in developing a collaborative initiative in aquaculture. John Hyde conducted a tour of the impressive aquaculture and tech tank facilities, and again discussed goals an aquaculture collaborative might achieve. Finally, they met with Toby Garfield, Deputy Director (Acting) of SWFSC, and discussed various subjects, including Dr. Chris Kelble's partnership with him in their EBM projects.

Field Work

● Dr. Denis Pierrot and Kevin Sullivan visited the EIMSKIP MV Selfoss and started the installation of a pCO2 system on the vessel, which transits between Iceland and Portland, Maine.

● The Grenada CREWS station was installed September 26, 2018 by the CREWS Team (minus Jim) at Kahonae Reef. You can see the chronology of the adventure at the CREWS Blog (KRGN1) at: https://krgn1-log.blogspot.com/.

● Joe Bishop and Dr. Mana Amornthammarong are traveling with Albert Jones of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center, and John Halas of Environmental Moorings, Int., to finalize the installation of CREWS buoys in Grenada and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, September 24 - October 2. Once the data are transmitting, they will be available on the CHAMP Portal page at: www.coral.noaa.gov/champportal.

Outreach and Education

● On September 27th, Dr. Ruben Van Hooidonk will be presenting a talk on the impacts of climate change on coral reefs during a Climate Diplomacy Day. This is an event hosted by the Miami Business School at the University of Miami on the main campus. It is organized by various EU consulates (German, British, Italy and Dutch). During Climate Diplomacy Week (September 24 to 30), EU Delegations, embassies and Consulates General of several EU Member States around the world hold various events to foster dialogue and cooperation on climate change, showcase success stories and inspire further action. Other participants at the University of Miami event include Ben Kirtman, John A. Quelch and Bryan Norcross.

September 17, 2018

Meetings

● Kelly Montenero, Charline Quenee, and Dr. Chris Kelble will be hosting an indicator selection workshop for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) on September 20. This meeting is co-hosted by FKNMS staff that are collaborating on the CRCP funded Florida Keys IEA. The meeting aims to identify and prioritize data-rich indicators that will be used to assess the status of the FKNMS for ensuing FKNMS condition reports. After the meeting on Friday, Kelly Montenero and Dr. Chris Kelble will be meeting with Sarah Fangman, FKNMS superintendent to update her on the Florida Keys IEA progress and make sure the products we produce will be of use to her and the FKNMS.

Congressional Briefing

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin of AOML will join colleagues from NMFS (Cisco Werner) and NOS (Steve Thur) to brief staff from the Senate Appropriations Committee's Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies on NOAA's 'omics work.

Outreach and Education

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending and presenting at the Florida SeaGrant Biscayne Bay WaterWatch appreciation night on September 19. AOML analyzes the nutrient and chlorophyll-a samples collected by the Biscayne Bay WaterWatch citizen scientists network developed and led by Florida SeaGrant.

Report

● Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk is the second author on the UNESCO report "Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs". The report will be published in early September by UNESCO/World Heritage and will be available from the UNESCO website (as the First Assessment). It reports on heat stress in natural World Heritage properties during the third global coral bleaching event which took place on June 2014 through May 2017. It updates the first assessment with high-resolution future projection analysis under the RCP2.6 emissions scenario, in which emissions peak during the current decade (2010-2020) and achieve the limit of well below 2°C by 2100. This updated analysis provides understanding of the implications of meeting the long-term goal of the UNFCCC Paris Agreement for World Heritage-listed coral reefs. Under a CO2 emission business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5), all 29 World Heritage-listed coral reef properties are expected to experience annual severe bleaching this century, leading to dramatic deterioration in ecological functioning and decline in the quality and quantity of ecosystem services these reefs provide. When emissions follow the RCP2.6 scenario, no World Heritage-listed coral reefs would experience annual severe bleaching this century.

September 10, 2018

Congratulations

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof was selected for the steering committee of the newly formed International Oceanic Commission (IOC) Working Group on Integrated Ocean Carbon Research. This high-level WG will fill knowledge gaps related to ocean carbon by designing and promoting the implementation of the new generation of integrated ocean carbon research.

Manuscripts

● The 2nd edition of the reference series "World Seas" will be released on September 21. The volume contains a chapter on 'omics: K.D. Goodwin, F. Muller-Karger, G. Canonico. Molecular Approaches for an Operational Marine Biodiversity Observation Network. In World Seas: An Environmental Evaluation, Vol III. Ecological Issues and Environmental Impacts, 2nd edition. C. Sheppard, ed., Academic Press, ISBN: 9780128050521 (2018). Pre-order is available now, with a 15% discount from:
https://www.elsevier.com/books/world-seas-an-environmental-evaluation/sheppard/978-0-12-805052-1.

Field Work

● Dr. Kirsten Harper will be joining the Monterey Bay Research Institute (MBARI) on the Controlled, Agile, and Novel Observing Network (CANON) cruise aboard the R/V Western Flyer on September 6th - 11th. During the CANON cruise, paired CTD and 3G ESP/LRAUV samples ("eAUV") will be collected to compare methods of sampling biodiversity through environmental DNA (eDNA). In addition, Dr. Harper will be collecting eDNA samples on the R/V Reuben Lasker in June 2018 which will be used for the continuation of her project focusing on detecting the diurnal movement of fish species using eDNA. Following the CANON cruise, Dr. Harper will remain at MBARI until September 14th to learn MBARI's protocol for metabarcoding of eDNA samples, and apply this to her own samples when she returns to NOAA.

Meetings

● Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk, Dr. Leticia Barbero and Dr. Rik Wanninkhof attended the Ocean Acidification Research to Product Development Workshop 2018 in Silver Spring on Sept 12-14. The meeting goals were to determine ocean acidification projects that exhibit operational potential or are currently being developed for operational delivery. Participants proposed ways to overcome barriers that currently inhibit operational delivery.

September 4, 2018

Field Work

● The first deployment of an "eAUV" in western Lake Erie will occur on August 27- September 5, 2018. This long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LRAUV) carrying an integrated 3rd Generation Environmental Sample Processor (3G ESP) will relay concentrations of harmful algae toxin in near-real time and archive samples for genomic analysis. Dr. Kelly Goodwin will travel to GLERL at the end of the mission to help with instrument and sample recovery. Click Here to View the Press Release.

● Dr. Kirsten Harper will be joining the Monterey Bay Research Institute (MBARI) on the Controlled, Agile, and Novel Observing Network (CANON) cruise aboard the R/V Western Flyer on September 6th - 11th. During the CANON cruise, paired CTD and 3G ESP/LRAUV samples ("eAUV") will be collected to compare methods of sampling biodiversity through environmental DNA (eDNA). In addition, Dr. Harper will be collecting eDNA samples on the R/V Reuben Lasker in June 2018 which will be used for the continuation of her project focusing on detecting the diurnal movement of fish species using eDNA. Following the CANON cruise, Dr. Harper will remain at MBARI until September 14th to learn MBARI's protocol for metabarcoding of eDNA samples, and apply this to her own samples when she returns to NOAA.

Meetings

● AOML-SEFSC hosted a science symposium on Wednesday, September 5th, followed by a planning and coordination workshop on Thursday, September 6th. The symposium on Wednesday, September 5th took place from 12:30-5:00 in the AOML first floor conference room. The workshop on Thursday, September 6th took place from 8:30-4:30 in the RSMAS Library.

August 27, 2018

Manuscripts

● The companion papers entitled "Effect of seawater temperature, pH, and nutrients on the distribution and character of low abundance shallow water benthic foraminifera in the Galápagos" and "Shallow water benthic foraminifera of the Galápagos archipelago: ecologically sensitive carbonate producers in an atypical tropical oceanographic setting" with AOML/OCED co-author Dr. Derek Manzello were accepted for publication in the journals PLoS One and Journal of Foraminiferal Research, respectively. Benthic foraminifera, a group of unicellular protists that construct calcium carbonate shells, are sensitive to environmental change, making them indicators of coral reef water quality and health. These studies assessed shallow-water foraminiferal assemblages from 19 locations spanning the Galapagos archipelago. Foram abundances were low, averaging only 0.7% of all sand-sized carbonate grains, yet a total of 161 species in 72 genera were found. The combined impact of the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and upwelling from the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) were the main drivers impacting foraminiferal abundances and assemblage patterns throughout the archipelago. Repeated ENSO temperature anomalies appear to have predominantly driven down foraminiferal density, while chronically high nutrients and low aragonite saturation and low pH—induced by EUC upwelling and La Niña anomalies—likely inhibited post-ENSO recovery. While the Eastern Tropical Pacific does not show the diversity of its western counterpart, Galápagos foraminiferal assemblages revealed a relatively high foraminiferal diversity for the region, as well as evidence in support of earlier reports of high endemism within the archipelago.

● Humphreys AF, Halfar J, Ingle JC, Manzello DP, Reymond CE, Westphal H, Riegl B (2018) Shallow water benthic foraminifera of the Galápagos archipelago: ecologically sensitive carbonate producers in an atypical tropical oceanographic setting. Journal of Foraminiferal Research, In press.

● Humphreys A, Halfar J, Ingle J, Manzello DP, Reymond C, Westphal H, Riegl B (2018) Effect of Seawater Temperature, pH, and Nutrients on the Distribution and Character of Low Abundance Shallow Water Benthic Foraminifera in the Galápagos. PLoS One, In press.

Field Work

● The first deployment of an "eAUV" in western Lake Erie will occur on August 27- September 5, 2018. This long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LRAUV) carrying an integrated 3rd Generation Environmental Sample Processor (3G ESP) will relay concentrations of harmful algae toxin in near-real time and archive samples for genomic analysis. Dr. Kelly Goodwin will travel to GLERL at the end of the mission to help with instrument and sample recovery. Click Here to View the Press Release.

Outreach and Education

Climate.gov has produced a Featured Image article about the OA Product Suite. Featured Images are articles featuring a compelling photo, map, or data visualization with a long caption that is about 400-500 words and explains the image and what a reader is seeing. It’s intended for a wider audience. The purpose of the article is to highlight the OAPS and the efforts we here at NOAA do to protect our oceans and the communities that depend on them from Ocean Acidification. The article shows an animation of surface water pH in the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico for the year 2015 and the text tells the story of OA, the fact that the oceans take up 30% of all CO2 emitted per year, and what this means for marine life. This product was developed by Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk. The OAPS is a further improvement of the original OAPS developed by Dwight Gledhill and both data and animations can be found here: http://www.coral.noaa.gov/accrete/oaps.html

August 20, 2018

Field Work

● Dr. Jim Hendee, Dr. Mana Ammornthammorang, and Joe Bishop are installing the latest buoy in thenetwork of CREWS buoys this week at Mayreau Gardens. The designation is SVGM1 for St. Vincent and The Grenadines, at Mayreau Gardens, site #1. The depth of the pins is ~58', right next to a drop off. The site gets significant current flow and water exchange from the south and north through tidal currents and the coral cover is significant. The schedule was to unload the ferry Friday night, drilling and buoy hull painting Saturday, buoy assembly and mooring line assembly Monday and Tuesday, buoy attachment Wednesday, review procedures with locals hosts on Thursday, and return to Miami on Friday.

● Ian Smith, Kelly Montenero, and Aly Thompson will be conducting a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on August 21-24. This survey is in support of NOAA’s efforts to support Everglades Restoration and ensure they benefit coastal ecosystems.

Meetings

● Dr. Luke Thompson will attend the 148th Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society (AFS) in Atlantic City, New Jersey from August 19-20. At AFS, he will present a talk in the session "Integration of Genetic Techniques with Quantitative Stock Assessment and Ecological Models for Resolving Fishery Management Issues" entitled "Computational Workflows for Rapid and Customizable Analysis of Amplicon Sequencing Data from Environmental DNA".

August 13, 2018

Congratulations

Dr. Rik Wanninkhof's article, "Relationship between wind speed and gas exchange over the ocean revisited," was included in a special collection celebrating the 15th year of publication of Limnology and Oceanography: Methods.

Manuscripts

● Climatic modulation of surface acidification rates through summertime wind forcing in the Southern Ocean by Liang Xue, Wei-Jun Cai, Taro Takahashi, Libao Gao, Rik Wanninkhof, Meng Wei, Kuiping Li, Lin Feng and Weidong Yu appeared in press today in Nature Communications.

● Spatial and temporal variability of pCO2, carbon fluxes and saturation states on the West Florida Shelf by Robbins, Barbero, Wanninkhof and others was accepted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Field Work

● Dr. Chris Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley are in Saipan from July 29 thru August 15 for the 'Omics funded project "Microbial Source Tracking Technology Transition & Microbiome Characterization of LBSP-impacted Saipan coastal water to guide coral management."

● Dr. Jim Hendee, Dr. Mana Ammornthammorang, and Joe Bishop are installing a CREWS buoy in St. Vincent this week and next. These buoys are being paid for by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (5Cs).

● Ian Smith and Aly Thompson will be conducting a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on August 21-24. This survey is in support of NOAA’s efforts to support Everglades Restoration and ensure they benefit coastal ecosystems.

● Kelly Montenero, Charline Quenee, and Ian Smith will be conducting a survey of South Florida’s coastal water quality, including measures of eDNA and coral holobiomes. This cruise will take place on the R/V Walton Smith from August 6-10.

Meetings

● Graham Kolodziej is giving a lecture entitled "Coral reef persistence in dynamic CO2 environments" at the 2018 Galapagos Ocean Acidification School, to be held at the Charles Darwin Research Station in Puerto Ayora, Galapagos, Ecuador from August 19-28, 2018. This course will train participants in different aspects of ocean acidification (OA) research and include both a class room and filed component. The field component includes a research cruise to the Roca Rendonda CO2 vent where participants will conduct OA research. Mr. Kolodziej will demonstrate use of the recently developed subsurface auto-samplers developed by Ian Enochs and Nate Formel, as well as deploy bioerosion monitoring units to cross-compare with the published results by Ian Enochs from CO2 vents in the Mariana Islands and Papua New Guinea. Finally, he will discuss previous OA research on Galapagos coral reefs that has been led by Derek Manzello since 2003.

July 30, 2018

Manuscripts

● The paper entitled "Seasonal variability of carbonate chemistry and decadal changes in waters of a marine sanctuary in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico" with AOML/OCED co-authors Derek Manzello, Ian Enochs, and Leticia Barbero was accepted for publication in the journal Marine Chemistry. This study reports seasonal water column carbonate chemistry data collected over a three-year period (late 2013 to 2016) at Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) located on the subtropical shelf edge of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The FGBNMS hosts the northernmost tropical coral species in the contiguous United States, with over 50% living coral cover. Temperature and salinity both played an important role in controlling the surface water carbonate system dynamics, although temperature was the sole significant factor when there was no flooding. The FGBNMS area acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 in winter and a CO2 source in summer, while the time-integrated CO2 flux is close to zero. Results from three cruises, i.e., the Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon Project (GOMECC-1) in 2007, the rapid response study, and the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3), revealed decreases in both pH and saturation state with respect to aragonite (Oarag) in subsurface waters (~100–250m) over time. These decreases are larger than those observed in other tropical and subtropical waters. Anthropogenic CO2 contributed 30–41% of the overall DIC increase, while elevated respiration accounted for the rest.

Hu X, Nuttall MF, Wang H, Yao H, Staryk CJ, McCutcheon MM, Eckert RJ, Embresi JA, Johnston M, Hickerson E, Schmahl GP, Manzello DP, Enochs IC, DiMarco S, Barbero L (2018) Seasonal variability of carbonate chemistry and decadal changes in waters of a marine sanctuary in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Marine Chemistry doi:10.1016/j.marchem.2018.07.006.

Field Work

● Dr. Chris Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley travel to Saipan from July 29 thru August 15 for the 'Omics funded project "Microbial Source Tracking Technology Transition & Microbiome Characterization of LBSP-impacted Saipan coastal water to guide coral management."

● Dr. Denis Pierrot will travel to Mar del Plata, Argentina as a mentor of the GOAN Pier2Peer program in order to train researchers on the best practices regarding a newly installed GO pCO2 system. He will be there for a week from Aug. 4th to Aug. 12th.

Education and Outreach

● The Frost Science Museum’s Outdoor Explorers Camp visited AOML to learn about ocean acidification and how the ACCRETE lab is using technology to study conditions on coral reef ecosystems. The group was made up of 14 sixth through eighth grade students from Miami-Dade County and four Frost employees. The program at AOML was led by CIMAS Research Associate Nate Formel and Gulliver Preparatory School teacher Alan Piggot. The campers were introduced to the scope of work being done in the Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystem Division (OCED) at AOML and, more specifically, to the concept of ocean acidification and how it is impacting local coral reefs. After a few hands-on labs to help reinforce the main concepts of our changing ocean chemistry, the kids toured the ACCRETE Advanced Manufacturing and Design Lab (AMDL) and Experimental Reef Lab (ERL) to see the technology that OCED and the University of Miami are utilizing to create new and innovative tools for studying conditions on coral reefs.

Frost campers helped the ACCRETE group by participating in labs written as outreach related to a new subsurface automated water sampler developed by Dr. Ian Enochs and Nate Formel over the last year. The final project for the visiting campers, before heading home, was to create their own simplified version of the lab’s subsurface automated samplers (SAS). The campers raced each other, completing the circuitry themselves, to finish building the samplers and test them out. At the end of the day the campers left with a souvenir from the AMDL’s laser cutter, as well as a greater knowledge of the state of our oceans and what’s being done at AOML and CIMAS to study and conserve them. The lesson plans used for the visit were designed for a classroom setting, but proved to be easily adaptable for the enthusiastic Frost students.

July 23, 2018

Notable Events

● Dr. Luke Thompson has been promoted to Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi, which is his university partner with the Northern Gulf Institute. He will continue to report to AOML/OCED and remain stationed at Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, California.

Field Work

● Patrick Mears and Charles Featherstone are in their last week of the East Coast Acidification cruise with an expected arrival in Miami on July 29. A four-day delayed departure and a severe strom over the weekend have impacted execution of cruise objectives.

● In late July, Dr. Chris Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley will be traveling to Saipan in the Northern Mariana Islands. This is the final segment of a technology transfer program with CNMI BECQ (The Bureau of Environmental and Coastal Quality) and the Pall Corporation. They will be engaging in water quality work involving molecular source tracking of land based sources of pollution with partners from BECQ and American University. This study was originally funded by CRCP, while the latter part is funded through the AOML Omics initiative.

● Dr. Jim Hendee, Joe Bishop, and Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong will travel August 13-24 to St. Vincent and the Grenadines for the installation of a CREWS station.

July 16, 2018

Manuscripts

● A manuscript entitled "Ascorbic acid as a reductant for extraction of iron-bound phosphorus in soil samples: a method comparison" co-authored by Dr. Zhang and Dr. Lanning has been accepted for publication in Communication in Soil Science and Plant Analysis.

Field Work

● Charles Featherstone and Patrick Mears are participating in the ECOA-2 research cruise from June 22 to July 29.

July 9, 2018

Manuscripts

● Multiple authors, including Dr. Rik Wanninkhof, have submitted their paper, "The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2 from 1994 to 2007" to Science. In the manuscript, they quantify the oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2 over the period 1994 to 2007 using inorganic carbon observations from the GO-SHIP global repeat hydrography program. AOML and PMEL are major contributors to the international GO-SHIP program .

Field Work

● Kelly Montenero, Charline Quenee, and Ian Smith conducted the juvenile sportfish survey in Florida Bay on July 9-13.

● Alyssa Thompson was in Key West from July 9 - 10 to conduct a hull dive aboard the R/V Gordon Gunter.

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley will be travelling to Galveston, TX on July 12 to assist with the second part of the Beach Exposure And Child HEalth Study (UM BEACHES) project. This study is funded through the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative with collaborative institutions including the University of Arkansas and the University of Texas, and is intended to assess how child interaction with the beach may increase their risk of exposure to beach contaminants. The Miami portion of the study was successfully completed last week, having taken place on Crandon Beach and Haulover Beach. UM student intern Alexander Richardson, UM HHMI student interns Brandon Rogers and Alexandra Ayala, and Hollings Scholar Anthony Bonacolta were an integral part in making the Miami side of the BEACHES Project a big success.

● Dr. Kirsten Harper and Dr. Kelly Goodwin will be in the field on July 14 collecting San Diego Bay water for analysis of marine turtle eDNA. eDNA sampling will co-occur with routine turtle monitoring. Development of eDNA methods would allow animals to be tracked using the DNA from sloughed or excreted cells and reduce the need for net capture of animals.

● Members of ACCRETE, including Graham Koldziej, Catalina Aguilar, Nate Formel, Liz Dutra, and John Morris, are conducting National Coral Reef Monitoring Plan operations in the Dry Tortugas this week on board the R/V Angari. They will be conducting carbonate budget surveys, trading out instruments, as well as characterizing diel carbonate chemistry dynamics using Subsurface Automatic Samplers (SAS) developed by Dr. Ian Enochs and Nate Formel.

● Dr. Stephanie Rosales and Dr. Lew Gramer of CIMAS did three reef site surveys in the Upper Keys on July 12th with Dr. Dana Williams (SEFSC) and RSMAS students Ben Young and Ana Palacio. The surveys are the first part of a new study funded by the NOAA 'Omics Initiative, to better understand differences in disease resistance among out-planted Acroporid corals, by characterizing the corals' transcriptomes, microbiomes, and their oceanographic habitat.

● Charles Featherstone and Patrick Mears are participating in the ECOA-2 research cruise from June 22 to July 29.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Human Dimensions Working Group meeting July 9-10 in Baton Rouge, LA.

● Dr. Neda Trifonova and Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Qualitative Network Modeling Working Group meeting July 11-13 in Baton Rouge, LA. Neda and Chris lead this working group that investigates and compares the differences among fuzzy-logic cognitive mapping, Bayesian belief networks and qualitative network modeling to conduct scenario evaluations with conceptual models.

Education and Outreach

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley is an invited speaker at the Frost Museum on July 12 for their Summer Science Camp following the theme of Sustainability and Climate Solutions titled "Keeping it Current - Climate Design Lab." Dr. Gidley's presentation is entitled "Human Health Challenges in the Face of a Changing Climate."

July 2, 2018

Manuscripts

● The manuscript "Climatic modulation of surface acidification rates through summertime wind forcing in the Southern Ocean" by Liang Xue, Wei-Jun Cai, Taro Takahashi, Libao Gao, Rik Wanninkhof, Meng Wei, Kuiping Li, Lin Feng, and Weidong Yu [Paper #NCOMMS-17-11366C] was accepted for publication in Nature Communications.

● OCED scientists published a paper entitled "The influence of diel carbonate chemistry fluctuations on the calcification rate of Acropora cervicornis under present day and future acidification conditions" in the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology.

Enochs IC, Manzello DP, Jones PJ, Aguilar C, Cohen K, Valentino L, Chopmeyer S, Koldziej G, Jankulak M, Lirman D (2018). "The influence of diel carbonate chemistry fluctuations on the calcification rate of Acropora cervicornis under present day and future acidification conditions." Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 506: 135-143.

● The manuscript entitled "Advancing Marine Biological Observations and Data Requirements of the Complementary Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) and Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) Frameworks" was published in Frontiers in Marine Science, section Ocean Observation. This manuscript was authored by Frank Edgar Muller-Karger, Patricia Miloslavich, Nicholas J Bax, Samantha Simmons, Mark John Costello, Isabel Sousa Pinto, Gabrielle Canonico, Woody Turner, Michael Gill, Enrique Montes, Ben Best, Jay Pearlman, Patrick Halpin, Daniel Dunn, Abigail Benson, Corinne Martin, Lauren Weatherdon, Ward Appeltans, Pieter Provoost, Eduardo Klein, Chris Kelble, Robert J. Miller, Francisco Chavez, Katrin Iken, Sanae Chiba, David Obura, Laetitia M. Navarro, Henrique M Pereira, Valerie Allain, Sonia Batten, Lisandro Benedetti-Cecchi, J. Emmett Duffy, Raphael M Kudela, Lisa-Maria Rebelo, Yunne Shin, Gary Geller.

Field Work

● Kelly Montenero, Charline Quenee, and Ian Smith will be conducting the juvenile sportfish survey in Florida Bay July 9-13.

● Charles Featherstone and Patrick Mears are participating in the ECOA-2 research cruise from June 22 to July 29.

IT Security Training

● The FY18 IT Security Awareness Course was announced by the NOAA CIO offic and has set a due date of COB August 31, 2018 for completion of this course. A link to the course can be found at: https://campus.noaasecure.us/index.k2?locRef=1.

June 25, 2018

Manuscripts

● A paper entitled "Environmental radiation alters the gut microbiome of the bank vole Myodes glareolus" with AOML/OCED co-author Dr. Luke Thompson was accepted for publication in The ISME Journal. This is the first study to quantify how the gut microbiome of wild animals is affected by exposure to environmental pollutants. The data show that exposure to environmental radiation is associated with major changes in gut microbial composition, including a shift in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio and predicted functional profiles. The paper also pioneers the use of statistical methods that allow robust detection of taxonomic differences in compositional data.

Lavrinienko, A., T. Mappes, E. Tukalenko, T.A. Mousseau, A.P. Møller, R. Knight, J.T. Morton, L.R. Thompson and P.C. Watts. Environmental radiation alters the gut microbiome of the bank vole Myodes glareolus. Accepted, ISME Journal.

Field Work

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley along with student interns Brandon Rogers and Alexandra Ayala will be taking part in the UM BEACHES (Beach Exposure And Child Hralth Study) June 21 through June 29. This study is funded through the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative with collaborative institutions including the University of Arkansas and the University of Texas, and is intended to assess how child interaction with the beach may increase their risk of exposure to beach contaminants. The first portion of the study will take place on Crandon Beach, with the second half at Haulover Beach.

● Ian Smith, Aly Thompson, and Kelly Montenero will be conducting the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration research cruise aboard the R/V Savannah on June 22-26.

● Charles Featherstone and Patrick Mears are participating in the ECOA-2 research cruise from June 22 to July 29.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble attended the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Steering Committee Meeting on June 26-30 in Boulder, CO.

IT Security Training

● The FY18 IT Security Awareness Course was announced late Friday afternoon. by the NOAA CIO office. NOAA has set a due date of COB August 31, 2018 for completion of this course. A link to this course can be found at: https://campus.noaasecure.us/index.k2?locRef=1.

June 18, 2018

Congratulations

● Dr. Jia-Zhong Zhang has been invited to serve as a member of editorial board of Scientific Reports.

Field Work

● Dr. Jim Hendee, Joe Bishop, and Dr. Mana Amornthammarong will be installing an ICON buoy in Grenada from June 11 through June 22.

● Ian Smith, Aly Thompson, and Kelly Montenero will be conducting the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration research cruise aboard the R/V Savannah on June 22-26.

● Charles Featherstone and Patrick Mears will be participating in the ECOA-2 research cruise from June 22 to July 29.

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin, Dr. Chris Sinigalliano, and Dr. Kirsten Harper participated in the 2018 Ocean Sampling Day (OSD). OSD is a global sampling event that was held on June 21, 2018. EU partners will analyze the DNA to gain a global snapshot of the microbial ecology of the earth's oceans. Learn more at: http://www.assembleplus.eu/research/ocean-sampling-day-2018.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Steering Committee Meeting on June 26-30 in Boulder, CO.

June 11, 2018

Publications

● OCED and RSMAS scientists provided input to a climate.gov web article on anthropogenic CO2 uptake in the Atlantic Ocean: https://www.climate.gov/news-features/featured-images/cruises-cut-slice-through-atlantics-carbon-pie.

Summer Interns

● Naja Murphy will be joining OCED as a University of Miami undergraduate summer intern. She will be participating in research to investigate the best methodology for conducting oxygen incubations for primary productivity. In addition, Naja will be participating in field work including the upcoming research cruise on the R/V Savannah.

Field Work

● Dr. Jim Hendee, Joe Bishop, and Dr. Mana Amornthammarong will be installing an ICON buoy in Grenada from June 11 through June 22.

● Ian Smith, Kelly Montenero and Charline Quenee will be in the Florida Bay on June 12-15 to conduct juvenile sportfish and seagrass monitoring.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the Gulf of Mexico Alliance All Hands-Meeting and pre-meeting workshop for the RESTORE Council Monitoring and Assessment Program on June 11-13.

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be attending the SOCCOM annual meeting in Princeton, NJ on June 11-13.

● Dr. Neda Trifonova and Dr. Lew Gramer will attend the 2018 ASLO Summer Meeting in Victoria, British Columbia, June 10-15. Dr. Trifonova will be presenting "Detecting Tipping Points to Improve Gulf of Mexico Restoration and Management" and Dr. Gramer will be presenting "Physical Habitat as a Driver of Coral Reef Microbiome Community Structure: Next-Generation-Sequencing and Oceanography."

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Steering Committee Meeting on June 26-30 in Boulder, CO.

June 4, 2018

Manuscripts

● Dr. Chris Kelble is a co-author on a manuscript accepted for publication in Frontiers in Marine Science. The manuscript entitled "Advancing Marine Biological Observations and Data Requirements of the Complementary Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) and Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) Frameworks" explores how we can operationalize two frameworks; one being proposed for global biodiversity monitoring and one for ocean monitoring. The manuscripts proposes a hierarchical methodology to meld the two frameworks for the development of ocean biodiversity observational systems.

Frank Edgar Muller-Karger, Patricia Miloslavich, Nicholas J Bax, Samantha Simmons, Mark John Costello, Isabel Sousa Pinto, Gabrielle Canonico, Woody Turner, Michael Gill, Enrique Montes, Ben Best, Jay Pearlman, Patrick Halpin, Daniel Dunn, Abigail Benson, Corinne Martin, Lauren Weatherdon, Ward Appeltans, Pieter Provoost, Eduardo Klein, Chris Kelble, Robert J. Miller, Francisco Chavez, Katrin Iken, Sanae Chiba, David Obura, Laetitia M. Navarro, Henrique M Pereira, Valerie Allain, Sonia Batten, Lisandro Benedetti-Cecchi, J. Emmett Duffy, Raphael M Kudela, Lisa-Maria Rebelo, Yunne Shin, Gary Geller. In Press. Advancing Marine Biological Observations and Data Requirements of the Complementary Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) and Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) Frameworks. Frontiers in Marine Science.

● The paper entitled "State of corals and coral reefs of the Galápagos Islands (Ecuador): past, present and future" with AOML/OCED's Dr. Derek Manzello as a co-author was accepted for publication in Marine Pollution Bulletin. This discusses the status and trend of coral communities and coral reefs in the Galapagos Islands, focusing on the lack of recovery for all but one coral reef site since the 1982-83 El Nino warming event that led to mass coral bleaching mortality.

Glynn P.W., Feingold J., Baker A., Banks S., Baums I., Cole J., Colgan M., Fong P., Glynn P.J., Manzello D.P., Riegl B., Ruttenberg B., Smith T.B., Vera-Zambrano M. (2018). State of corals and coral reefs of the Galápagos Islands (Ecuador): past, present and future. Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press.

● An OpEd piece on the need for systematic and sustained plankton observations in ocean observing programs is published in Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin. It was produced by the Scientific Committee for Ocean Research working group SCOR WG-154 “Integration of Plankton-Observing Sensor Systems to Existing Global Sampling Programs (P-OBS, http://www.scor-int.org/SCOR_WGs_WG154.htm.

Boss, E., Waite, A., Muller-Karger, F. , Yamazaki, H., Wanninkhof, R., Uitz, J., Thomalla, S., Sosik, H., Sloyan, B., Richardson, A., Miloslavich, P., Karstensen, J., Grégori, G., Fennel, K., Claustre, H., Cornejo, M., Berman-Frank, I., Batten, S. and Acinas, S. (2018). Beyond Chlorophyll Fluorescence: The Time is Right to Expand Biological Measurements in Ocean Observing Programs. Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin. doi:10.1002/lob.10243.

● Dr. Luke Thompson is co-author on a manuscript accepted for publication inNature Reviews Microbiology. This review discusses the best practices for performing a microbiome study, including experimental design, choice of molecular analysis technology, methods for data analysis, and the integration of multiple omics data sets. Recommendations include replacing operational taxonomic unit-based analyses with new methods that are based on exact sequence variants, how to integrate metagenomic and metabolomic data, and how to deal with compositional data analysis. Many of the issues, including classic issues such as experimental design and research reproducibility, will be relevant to bioinformatics analyses beyond microbiome research.

Knight, R., A. Vrbanac, B.C. Taylor, A. Aksenov, C. Callewaert, J. Debelius, A. Gonzalez, T. Kosciolek, L. McCall, D. McDonald, A.V. Melnik, J.T. Morton, J. Navas, R.A. Quinn, J.G. Sanders, A.D. Swafford, L.R. Thompson, A. Tripathi, Z.Z. Xu, J.R. Zaneveld, Q. Zhu, J.G. Caporaso and P.C. Dorrestein. Best practices for analyzing microbiomes. Nature Reviews Microbiology (2018), DOI: 10.1038/s41579-018-0029-9.

Summer Interns

● A NOAA Hollings Scholar, Anthony Bonacolta, joins OCED this summer. Anthony, a senior from the University of Miami, will be conducting his research for the NOAA Hollings Scholarship Program on the genomic characterization of bacterial biodiversity in South Florida coral reef microbiomes.

● OCED is also joined this summer by University of Miami undergraduate summer intern Alex Richardson, who will be participating in research on molecular microbial source tracking of microbial contaminants from land-based sources of pollution (LBSP) in coastal marine habitats. This includes molecular analysis of environmental sample from across Southeast Florida and from Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Field Work

● On June 7-9, 2018, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in partnership with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) will field test an instrument called an Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) that has been installed inside a long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (LRAUV). The instrument provides a mobile platform to autonomously collect samples for 'omic analysis. Two AUVs will be deployed by MBARI’s R/V Western Flyer in rendezvous with NOAA’s R/V Reuben Lasker during its annual Pelagic Juvenile Rockfish Recruitment and Ecosystem Assessment Survey. The ships will meet at an offshore upwelling front identified by autonomous vehicle and conduct CTD and net tows in coordination with the ESP-equipped AUV ("eAUV"). OCED’s Dr. Kirsten Harper will be aboard the Lasker collecting water samples to compare with samples collected by the eAUV. In addition to engagement with the eAUV, she will collect water from CTDs in association with mid water trawls to investigate the environmental DNA (eDNA) signals of selected fish species.

● The R/V Ron Brown will complete the GO-SHIP I07 cruise on June 8 with Dr. Denis Volkov AOML/CIMAS is chief scientist with 26 scientists and students representing 19 institutions. AOML participants include Andy Stefanik, Ian Smith, Chuck Featherstone, Leah Chomiak, and Jay Hooper. Follow their adventures on the cruise blog at https://i07n.wordpress.com/.

Meetings

● Dr. Derek Manzello is an invited speaker at the workshop entitled "Interventions to Increase the Resilience of Coral Reefs" that is being hosted by the National Academy of Sciences on 31 May 2018 at RSMAS. The goal of the workshop is to explore the state of the science, the risks, and the benefits of ecological and genetic interventions with the potential to increase the long-term persistence of coral reefs in environmentally degraded scenarios. The workshop is one component of the information-gathering activities that will inform the deliberations of the National Academies’ Committee on Interventions to Increase the Resilience of Coral Reefs. Manzello will present on the current and future trends of climate change and ocean acidification on Caribbean coral reefs. The workshop is open to the public: http://www.dels.nas.edu/Study-In-Progress/Interventions-Increase-Resilience/DELS-OSB-17-01?bname=osb.

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the Gulf of Mexico Alliance All Hands-Meeting and pre-meeting workshop for the RESTORE Council Monitoring and Assessment Program on June 11-13.

● Dr. Derek Manzello is traveling to Cebu, Philippines from 1-11 June 2018 where he will give an oral presentation at the 4th Asia-Pacific Coral Reef Symposium. Dr. Manzello's talk is entitled "East meets West: Identifying the Common Denominators that Drive Coral Bleaching Resistance and Resilience in the Atlantic and Pacific." This talk will highlight the recent research of the Acidification, Climate and Coral Reef Ecosystems Team (ACCRETE) on resilient coral reefs in the Florida Keys and compare/contrast these results with resilient reef sites in Palau, Singapore, and Great Barrier Reef. The goal is to determine if there are common environmental and biological factors associated with reef areas that may be resistant to thermal stress, as well as stimulate discussion for coordinated research between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to better understand these trends.

● Dr. Stephanie Rosales will be attending a workshop entitled "Mining Microbial and Viral Genomes and Metagenomes for Biotechnological Applications Using IMG" at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) meeting on June 7-11. Dr. Rosales will also be presenting a talk on the "The Physical Habitat as a Driver of Microbiome Structure on Urban-impacted Coral Reefs".

● Dr. Neda Trifonova will attend the Effect of Climatre Change on the World’s Oceans in Washington DC on June 4-8. Dr. Trifonova will be presenting "Predicting Ecological Responses to Climate Variability with a Dynamic Bayesian Network Model".

May 21, 2018

Announcements

● Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED, together with Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings, Inc., installed the third CREWS buoy (in St.Lucia) of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The station was installed within the Soufriere Marine Management Area on the west side of St. Lucia at latitude 13° 51.5456' N, longitude 61° 04.2784' W. Conversations were conducted with locals in outreach efforts led by the team to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with St. Lucia researchers in the formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

Field Work

● The GO-SHIP I07 cruise on the R/V Brown continues with Dr. Denis Volkov AOML/CIMAS as chief scientist and 26 scientists and students representing 19 institutions participating. AOML participants include Andy Stefanik, Ian Smith, Chuck Featherstone, Leah Chomiak, and Jay Hooper. Follow their adventures on the cruise blog at https://i07n.wordpress.com/.

● Chris Kelble, Kelly Montenero, Alyssa Thompson, and Charline Quenee conducted the juvenile sportfish survey in Florida Bay on May 21-24.

Meetings

● Dr. Luke Thompson will give two talks about the Earth Microbiome Project in the San Francisco Bay Area at the end of this month. On May 29 he will speak at the DOE Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek about "Lessons from a scientifically crowdsourced microbiome survey". On May 30 he will speak at the Department of Earth Systems at Stanford University about "Investigating the structure of microbial diversity on Earth".

May 15, 2018

Field Work

● Patrick Mears and the R/V Nathaniel Palmer returned to port on May 15th, after conducting GO-SHIP 2018 S04P.

● The GO-SHIP I07 cruise on the R/V Brown continues with Dr. Denis Volkov AOML/CIMAS as chief scientist and 26 scientists and students representing 19 institutions participating. AOML participants include Andy Stefanik, Ian Smith, Chuck Featherstone, Leah Chomiak, and Jay Hooper. Follow their adventures on the cruise blog at https://i07n.wordpress.com/.

● Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED will join Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings Inc., to install the third CREWS buoy (in St.Lucia) of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The installation effort will be May 7 - May 18, and will include installing mooring pins to the bottom, preparing the buoy electronics, and eventual deployment at the final site in Soufriere Marine Management Area on the west side of St. Lucia. Conversations with locals in outreach efforts will be led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with St. Lucia researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble, Shannon Martin, Kelly Montenero, Dr. Neda Trifonova and Charline Quenee hosted a regional meeting for the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ecosystem Assessment program in Key West May 14th-18th. The last day will be a special session coordinated with the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary to determine how the IEA program can benefit the Sanctuary's science needs and decision-making and kick-off the Florida Keys IEA effort funded by CRCP.

May 7, 2018

Bon Voyage

● This is Ben Vandine’s last week at AOML! Ben has been an extremely valuable asset to OCED and AOML serving as our field coordinator and AOML’s associate director. Ben and his wife are moving onto his next assignment in Woods Hole, MA. Ben will be serving as a co-captain on a 72' fisheries research vessel with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. ENS Aly Thompson has started taking over Ben’s responsibilities with the Small boat Program and other duties in OCED, and she has already proved a valuable asset to AOML field work.

Manuscripts

● The paper entitled "American Gut: an open platform for citizen-science microbiome research" with AOML/OCED author Dr. Luke Thompson was accepted for publication in the journal mSystems and will be published online May 15. This paper shows that a citizen-science, self-selected cohort shipping samples through the mail at room temperature recaptures many known gut microbiome results from clinically collected cohorts and reveals new ones. Of particular interest is integrating n=1 study data with the population data, showing that the extent of microbiome change after events such as surgery can exceed differences between distinct environmental biomes, and the effect of diverse plants in the diet, which we confirm with untargeted metabolomics on hundreds of samples.

McDonald, D., E.R. Hyde, J.W. Debelius, J.T. Morton, A. Gonzalez, G. Ackermann, A.A. Aksenov, B. Behsaz, C. Brennan, Y. Chen, L. DeRight-Goldasich, P.C. Dorrestein, R.R. Dunn, A.K. Fahimipourg, J. Gaffney, J.A. Gilbert, G. Gogul, J.L. Green, P. Hugenholtz, G. Humphrey, C. Huttenhower, M.A. Jackson, S. Janssen, D.V. Jeste, L. Jiang, S.T. Kelley, D. Knights, T. Kosciolek, J. Ladau, J. Leach, C. Marotz, D. Meleshko, A.V. Melnik, J.L. Metcalf, H. Mohimani, E. Montassier, J. Navas-Molina, T.T. Nguyen, S. Peddada, P. Pevzner, K.S. Pollard, G. Rahnavard, A. Robbins-Pianka, N. Sangwan, J. Shorenstein, L. Smarr, S. Song, T. Spector, A.D. Swafford, V.G. Thackray, L.R. Thompson, A. Tripathi, Y. Vazquez-Baeza, A. Vrbanac, P. Wischmeyer, E. Wolfe, Q. Zhu, The American Gut Consortium & R. Knight. (2018). American Gut: an open platform for citizen-science microbiome research. mSystems, DOI: 10.1128/mSystems.00031-18.

Fieldwork

● Patrick Mears is still on board the R/V Nathaniel Palmer conducting GO-SHIP 2018 S04P. Last week, they sampled from the Amundsen Sea to the Bellinghausen Sea.

● The GO-SHIP I07 cruise on the R/V Brown continues with Dr. Denis Volkov AOML/CIMAS as chief scientist and 26 scientists and students representing 19 institutions participating. AOML participants include Andy Stefanik, Ian Smith, Chuck Featherstone, Leah Chomiak, and Jay Hooper. Follow their adventures on the cruise blog at https://i07n.wordpress.com/.

Kelly Montenero and Dr. Chris Kelble participated in a south Florida Ecosystem Research Cruise aboard the R/V Walton Smith from April 30 through May 4.

● Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED will join Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings Inc., to install the third CREWS buoy (in St.Lucia) of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The installation effort will be May 7 - May 18, and will include installing mooring pins to the bottom, preparing the buoy electronics, and eventual deployment at the final site in Soufriere Marine Management Area on the west side of St. Lucia. Conversations with locals in outreach efforts will be led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with St. Lucia researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

Meetings

● Dr. Luke Thompson attended the 20th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting at UC San Diego, California, from May 2-4. The three-day meeting highlighted the nexus of genomic standards, microbiomes, and advances in metabolomics, immunome, and taxonomy.

AOML, SEFSC & Miami Forecast Office Open House

● School groups: Thursday & Friday 10-2:00 pm.

● General public: Saturday 10-3:00 pm.

● AOML is expecting an estimated 500 students will be visiting our facility on both Thursday and Friday.

Contact Erica Rule if you’d like to volunteer to help ensure student groups and visitors stay together and are guided from location to location on time.

April 30, 2018

Manuscripts

● The paper entitled "Resilience in carbonate production despite three coral bleaching events in five years on an inshore patch reef in the Florida Keys" with AOML/OCED authors Dr. Derek Manzello, Dr. Ian Enochs, and Graham Kolodziej was accepted for publication in the journal Marine Biology. The persistence of coral reef frameworks requires that calcium carbonate (CaCO3) production by corals and other calcifiers outpaces CaCO3 loss via physical, chemical, and biological erosion. Coral bleaching causes declines in CaCO3 production, but this varies with bleaching severity and the species impacted. We conducted census-based CaCO3 budget surveys at Cheeca Rocks, an inshore patch reef in the Florida Keys, annually from 2012-2016 and parameterized the budgets with coral core data collected in 2017. Carbonate production declined after the first year of back-to-back bleaching in 2014, but then increased after 2015 to values greater than the initial surveys in 2012. Cheeca Rocks is an outlier in the Caribbean and Florida Keys in terms of coral cover, carbonate production, and abundance of the coral species Orbicella faveolata, which is threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Given the resilience of this site to repeated bleaching events, it may deserve special management attention.

Large colonies of the ESA-listed coral species Orbicella faveolata during peak bleaching in 2014 and again in 2018, illustrating recovery of Cheeca Rocks. Coral colony in foreground is ~2m in height and likely 100-200 years old.

Manzello DP, Enochs IC, Kolodziej G, Carlton R, Valentino L (2018) Resilience in carbonate production despite three coral bleaching events in five years on an inshore patch reef in the Florida Keys. Marine Biology. In Press.

Fieldwork

● The R/V Ron Brown departed on April 23 for the GO-SHIP I07 cruise with Dr. Denis Volkov, AOML/CIMAS as chief scientist and 26 scientists and students representing 19 institutions participating. AOML participants include Andy Stefanik, Ian Smith, Chuck Featherstone, Leah Chomiak, and Jay Hooper. Follow their adventures on the cruise blog at https://i07n.wordpress.com/.

Kelly Montenero and Dr. Chris Kelble will be participating on a south Florida Ecosystem Research Cruise aboard the R/V Walton Smith from April 30 through May 4.

● Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED will join Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings Inc., to install the third CREWS buoy (in St.Lucia) of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The installation effort will be May 7 - May 18, and will include installing mooring pins to the bottom, preparing the buoy electronics, and eventual deployment at the final site in Soufriere Marine Management Area on the west side of St. Lucia. Conversations with locals in outreach efforts will be led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with St. Lucia researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

● Patrick Mears is still onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer conducting GO-SHIP 2018 S04P.

Meetings

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin and Dr. Kirsten Harper will attend a symposium on eDNA hosted by NOAA/NMFS with the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research. The US-Norway bilateral on eDNA will be held at Woods Hole, MA May 1-2, 2018. The meeting will have four main themes: 1) Overview of applications of eDNA in management of fisheries and aquacultures. 2) "eDNAta" - Reviewing existing reference databases. 3) Quantification of biomass based on eDNA: Where are we? How do we proceed? 4) Development of standardized eDNA sampling/analysis protocols. Each session will have talks by both the US and Norwegian participants followed by a roundtable discussion. Dr. Kirsten Harper will be presenting "Progress and future directions of eDNA approaches for population assessment of sea turtles."

April 23, 2018

Field Work

● The R/V Ron Brown is scheduled to start on GO-SHIP cruise I07 on April 23. Dr. Denis Volkov, AOML/CIMAS is the chief scientists and 26 scientists and students representing 19 institutions are participating. The AOML cruise participants are Andy Stefanik, Ian Smith, Chuck Featherstone, Leah Chomiak, and Jay Hooper. Follow their adventures on the IO7N cruise blog at https://i07n.wordpress.com/.

● Dr. Chris Kelble and Kelly Montenero will be participating on a south Florida Ecosystem Research Cruise aboard the R/V Walton Smith from April 30 through May 4.

Announcements

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin will provide an "Oceans Portfolio Priorities Pitch" on 'omics at the next OAR Oceans, Coasts, and Great Lakes Portfolio Meeting on April 23, 2018.

Dr. Luke Thompson has published digital versions of Earth Microbiome Project protocols for sample collection, DNA extraction, and amplicon sequencing to the protocols.io site. This effort supports AOML's contribution to the Global Omics Observatory Network (GLOMICON) by standardizing methods and making them available to the broader research community. The protocols can be found at https://www.protocols.io/groups/earth-microbiome-project/protocols.

● The new coral reef monitoring buoy was successfully installed in St Kitts on 4/16/2018 at Paradise reef and all data is transmitting successfully.

Fieldwork

● Patrick Mears is currently underway toward the ice of Antarctica as part of the GO-SHIP SO4P line in the Southern Ocean onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer.

April 16, 2018

Outreach and Education

● Last weekend Liz Dutra attended the USA Science & Engineering festival with over 375,000 attendees in Washington D.C. The focus of the festival was to immerse attendees in the world of STEM. Liz currently serves as the Marine Science Education and Outreach Manager for a non-profit called the Big Blue & You. Big Blue & You had an exhibit at the festival where Liz represented our laboratory as a Coral Reef Biologist. At Liz’s station, she was teaching attendees all about the pH scale in order to explain the term Ocean Acidification. Liz ran mini pH demonstrations in order to give attendees a true understanding of OA. Liz also spoke about what we do in OCED’s coral OA research using several coral skeletons and a coral core. Liz was partnered with an intern from the Coral Restoration Foundation, who was teaching attendees about what CRF does while they participated in an art project. Participants created a woven tapestry that emulated different colors of the ocean. Overall, we had a very well attended exhibit with over 1500-2000 participants. It was truly amazing to represent NOAA/OCED at the largest celebration of STEM in the country.

Fieldwork

● Patrick Mears is currently underway toward the ice of Antarctica as part of the GO-SHIP SO4P line in the Southern Ocean onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer.

● Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings, Inc., will join Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED, to install the second CREWS buoy of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The installation effort will be April 9 - 22, and will include installing mooring pins to the bottom, preparing the buoy electronics for deployment, eventual deployment at the final site "Anchors Away", at 17° 21' 23" N, 62° 51' 18: W. Conversations with locals in outreach efforts will be led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with St. Kitts researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

Announcements

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin participated in a brain-storming session hosted by Amazon on April 11, 2018. The meeting focused on ecosystems and fisheries data, including 'omics. Amazon Sustainability and Amazon Web Services (AWS) are working jointly to provide improved access to high-value data through the AWS Public Datasets program (PDS; https://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2008/12/03/public-data-sets-on-aws-now-available/). Amazon is currently identifying data needs for fisheries and partnering with NOAA, through the Big Data Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), to explore how NOAA data and AWS’s infrastructure may enable further work in this area. One goal of the meeting was to bring together Amazon, NOAA, and key stakeholders to identify current data-related challenges and discuss possible ways to address them.

April 9, 2018

Manuscripts

NOTE: This article is under embargo and should not be publicized anywhere until the embargo is lifted. The manuscript entitled "Loss of coral reef growth capacity to track future increases in sea-level" with OCED co-authors Derek Manzello, Renee Carlton, Ian Enochs, Graham Kolodziej, and Lauren Valentino was accepted for publication in Nature. This paper utilized data collected as part of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP) and is the result of a collaboration between OCED and Chris Perry of the University of Exeter, UK. This study calculated the vertical growth potential of >200 Tropical Western Atlantic and Indian Ocean reefs and compared it against recent and projected rates of sea-level rise under different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. It was found that few reefs will have the capacity to track sea-level rise projections under RCP 4.5 scenarios without sustained ecological recovery, whilst under RCP 8.5 most reefs are predicted to experience mean water depth increases >0.5 m by 2100. This has significant socio-economic and policy implications for urbanised tropical coastlines and reef islands as there will be increased flooding risk and coastal damage during storms as the physical buffering capacity of reefs is depressed. Urgent action to mitigate climate, sea-level and future ecological changes are thus needed to limit magnitudes of future reef submergence.

Perry C, Alvarez-Filip L, Graham N, Mumby PJ, Wilson SK, Kench PS, Manzello DP, Morgan K, Slangen ABA, Thompson DP, Januchowski-Hartley F, Smithers SG, Steneck RR, Carlton R, Edinger EE, Enochs IC, Estrada-Saldivar N, Haywood MDE, Kolodziej G, Murphy GN, Perez-Cervantes E, Suchley A, Valentino L, Boenish R, Wilson M, Macdonald C (2018) Loss of coral reef growth capacity to track future increases in sea-level. In Press. Nature.

● The manuscript entitled "Climate Change Threatens the World's Marine Protected Areas" and co-authored by Ruben van Hooidonk was accepted for publication in Nature Climate Change. The manuscript finds that continued business-as-usual emissions (RCP8.5) will likely result in thermal stress exceeding the Community Thermal Safety Margin (CTSM) in tropical MPAs by 2050. Although MPAs are widely-promoted as a means to mitigate the effects of climate change, the opposite perspective is more in line with the scientific reality: without drastic reductions in carbon emissions, ocean warming, acidification, and oxygen depletion in the 21st century will in all likelihood disrupt the composition and functioning of the ecosystems currently protected within the world’s MPAs.

U J Bruno, A Bates, C Cacciapaglia, E Pike, S Armstrup, R van Hooidonk, S Henson, R Aronson. Climate Change Threatens the World's Marine Protected Areas. Accepted. Nature Climate Change.

● The manuscript enitled "Taxon-specific aerosolization of bacteria and viruses in an experimental ocean-atmosphere mesocosm" with OCED co-author Luke Thompson was accepted for publication in Nature Communications. Airborne microbes from the ocean play important roles in Earth’s climate system and human health, yet little is known about factors controlling their transfer from the ocean to the atmosphere. We studied microbiomes of isolated sea spray aerosol (SSA) collected in a unique ocean-atmosphere facility, and demonstrated taxon-specific aerosolization of bacteria and viruses. These trends were conserved within taxonomic orders and classes, and temporal variation in aerosolization was similarly shared by related taxa. We observed enhanced transfer into SSA of Actinobacteria, certain Gammaproteobacteria, and lipid-enveloped viruses; conversely, Flavobacteriia, some Alphaproteobacteria, and Caudovirales were generally under-represented in SSA. Viruses did not transfer to SSA as efficiently as bacteria. The enrichment of mycolic acid-coated Corynebacteriales and lipid-enveloped viruses (inferred from genomic comparisons) suggested that hydrophobic properties increase transport to the sea surface and SSA. The results identify taxa relevant to atmospheric processes and a framework to further elucidate aerosolization mechanisms influencing microbial and viral transport pathways.

Michaud, J.M., L.R. Thompson, D. Kaul, J. Espinoza, R.A. Richter, Z.Z. Xu, C. Lee, K.M. Pham, C.M. Beall, F. Malfatti, F. Azam, R. Knight, K.A. Prather, C.L. Dupont & M.D. Burkart. (2018). Taxon-specific aerosolization of bacteria and viruses in an experimental ocean-atmosphere mesocosm. Accepted. Nature Communications.

● The manuscript enitled "Hidden in plain sight: The importance of cryptic interactions in marine plankton" authored by OCED’s Dr. Nicole Millette was accepted for publication in Limnology and Oceanography: Letters. Generalizations in foodweb modeling have helped scientists explain and study interactions within the aquatic environment. Established methods focus on quantifying and qualifying these generalizations, but rapid technological advancements in recent years have revealed that our generalizations of interactions may obscure significant processes within the plankton community. We explore a range of interactions within the planktonic foodweb that are "cryptic" because existing methods are biased against them with the intention of highlighting a range of cryptic interactions and the potential impact of overlooking them in future research. We discuss how including these interactions into biogeochemical and foodweb models alters our understanding of the transfer of carbon and other materials from one species/functional group to another and highlight examples of recent models that have incorporated cryptic interactions.

Millette, N, J Grosse, W Johnson, M Jungbluth, E Suter. 2018. Hidden in plain sight: The importance of cryptic interactions in marine plankton. Accepted. Limnology and Oceanography: Letters.

Announcements

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin was appointed to the NOAA Research Council’s ‘Omics Task Force.

Outreach

● Charline Quenee will take part in the Skype-a-Scientist program on 04/09/18. She will be virtually presenting to a class of 2nd to 5th graders from John P. Faber Elementary in New Jersey about marine science, conservation, and how to get involved in science.

● In collaboration with the Angari foundation, Dr. Ian Enochs recorded narration and voice over in an audio studio at the Miami Animation and Gaming International Complex (MAGIC) at the Wolfson Campus of Miami Dade College. The material will be incorporated into a virtual reality video and learning tool based on the OCED research at Cheeca Rocks and the Experimental Reef Lab.

Fieldwork

● John Morris, Nate Formel, and Dr. Ian Enochs will be traveling to the Grenadines next week to explore a volcanic vent off the island of Mayreau. The project represents a collaboration with Dr. Jim Hendee and Dr. Derek Manzello, aimed at identifying a high-temperature, high-CO2 Caribbean reef system. The team will be testing prototype Subsurface Automatic Sampler (SAS) units, designed and built in house at the OCED Advanced Manufacturing and Design (AMD) lab.

● Patrick Mears is currently underway toward the ice of Antarctica as part of the GO-SHIP SO4P line in the Southern Ocean onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer.

● Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings, Inc., will join Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED, to install the second CREWS buoy of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The installation effort will be April 9 - 22, and will include installing mooring pins to the bottom, preparing the buoy electronics for deployment, eventual deployment at the final site "Anchors Away", at 17° 21' 23" N, 62° 51' 18: W. Conversations with locals in outreach efforts will be led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with St. Kitts researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

Research Vessels

● OCED christened the division's new research vessel the R/V GBN1. The name means George Berberian Numero Uno, which is a nickname given to George many decades ago. OCED wanted to recognize George for his more than 40 years of service to AOML starting before AOML was constructed.

Farewell

● Dr. Paul Jones and Dr. Xaymara Serrano left OCED to pursue other ventures last week. Dr. Jones will be working for the South Florida Water Management District and Dr. Serrano will be working for the US Army Corps of Engineers in Jacksonville, FL.

Congratulations

● LT. Benjamin Vandine successfully passed his Master's presentation and examination on Thursday, April 5.

April 2, 2018

Announcements

● On April 3-4, there was a safety inspection of all AOML spaces conducted by visitors from NOAA's Environmental Compliance and Safety Assessment System (NECSAS).

● On April 4, RADM Tim Gallaudet, Acting NOAA Administrator and Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Dr. Neil Jacobs, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction visited AOML.

● Stephanie Rosales received a travel award to attend the American Society for Microbiology in June.

Manuscripts

● A news article has been submitted to Limnology and Oceanography describing the need for biological observations on sustained global ocean observation networks. This is the topic of a new Scientific Committee for Ocean Research (SCOR) working group entitled SCOR WG-154 "Integration of Plankton-Observing Sensor Systems to Existing Global Sampling Programs (P-OBS)".

"Beyond chlorophyll fluorescence: The time is right to expand biological measurements in oceanobserving programs". Emmanuel Boss, Anya Waite, Frank Muller-Karger, Hidekatsu Yamazaki, Rik Wanninkhof, Heidi Sosik, Bernadette Sloyan, Anthony Richardson, Patricia Miloslavich, Johannes Karstensen, Gérald Grégori, Katja Fennel, Herve Claustre, Marcela Cornejo, Ilana Berman-Frank, Sonia Batten, Silvia Acinas. Submitted to Limnology and Oceanography March 31, 2018.

● Dr. Neda Trifonova co-authored a paper entitled "Hidden variables in a Dynamic Bayesian Network identify ecosystem level change" which was published this week in Ecological Informatics. The paper describes the use of a series of Dynamic Bayesian network models fitted with different hidden variable structures to simulate a system that is known to have undergone a major structural change, i.e. the Baltic Sea food web. Dynamic Bayesian networks with hidden variables that can capture unobserved processes, have been proposed as a method to overcome the challenge of scarce data and static modeling approaches in terms of capturing functional changes in ecosystems. The setup of the hidden variables picked up a pattern that agrees with previous research regarding the system dynamics. The results suggest the hidden variable may in fact detect patterns before they can be clearly seen in the observed data, which provides a chance for predicting large-scale ecosystem changes.

Uusitalo, L., Tomczak, M.T., Müller-Karulis, B., Putnis, I., Trifonova, N. and Tucker, A., 2018. Hidden variables in a Dynamic Bayesian Network identify ecosystem level change. Ecological Informatics. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoinf.2018.03.003

Outreach

● Charline Quenee will take part in the Skype-a-Scientist program on 04/09/18. She will be virtually presenting to a class of 2nd to 5th graders from John P. Faber Elementary in New Jersey about marine science, conservation, and how to get involved in science.

Fieldwork

● Patrick Mears is currently underway toward the ice of Antarctica as part of the GO-SHIP SO4P line in the Southern Ocean onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer.

● Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings, Inc., will join Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED, to install the second CREWS buoy of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The installation effort will be April 9 - 22, and will include installing mooring pins to the bottom, preparing the buoy electronics for deployment, eventual deployment at the final site "Anchors Away", at 17° 21' 23" N, 62° 51' 18: W. Conversations with locals in outreach efforts will be led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with St. Kitts researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

Research Vessels

● The new research vessel is undergoing sea trials and, if successful, is being picked up from Dusky Marine on April 2. This week the vessel will be getting outfitted with electronics and next week will be the training for potential boat operators.

March 19, 2018

Welcome Aboard

● Kelly Montenero joined OCED this week as a CIMAS employee. She will be working on a new project implementing an integrated ecosystem assessment in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. In addition she will be helping with other field and laboratory responsibilities. This project aims to identify tipping points that should translate into management targets for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

Announcements

● OCED’s nutrient Lab recently completed the analysis of nutrient reference seawater samples as part of the 2017-2018 International Inter-Comparison Exercise sponsored by the International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP) and the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). More than 70 nutrient laboratories from 31 countries have participated in the study. During the study, nutrient reference samples of unknown concentration were prepared in Japan and Korea and supplied to participating laboratories for analysis, and the results were then reported back to the organizers. The exercise is part of an effort to develop nutrient reference material in seawater and a globally uniform analytical procedure for analysis of nutrient in seawater samples. By establishing international standards for nutrient comparability, researchers will be able to more accurately document the changes in ocean nutrient concentrations as results of change in natural and anthropogenic forcing in the oceans.

Workshops

● Dr. Chris Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley travelled to Saipan from March 5 - March 21 to conduct the second in a series of special technology transfer workshops on molecular Microbial Source Tracking (MST) for the Bureau of Environmental Coastal Quality (BECQ) of the US territory of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). These MST technology transfer workshops are intended to build state-of-the-art MST analytical capability at the CNMI BECQ to help them better protect and manage coral reef habitats and other critical coastal ecosystems. By combining the AOML MST training workshop with the American University stable isotope source tracking study, and the additional EPA support efforts for the BECQ, the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program is leveraging the capacity building at the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands with actual source tracking studies to provide actionable environmental intelligence for marine resource managers while establishing the CNMI BECQ as an on-going regional resource for this type of pollution source tracking technology.

● Dr. Luke Thompson will teach a workshop on microbiome analysis at the University of Oulu in Finland, March 19-21, 2018.

Fieldwork

● Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED along with Albert Jones from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings, Inc., are in Antigua to install the first CREWS buoy of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. They hope to deploy the mooring today at Monk's Head Reef in Antigua (17.015730o N, 61.872670o W). The team is also undertaking conversations with locals in outreach efforts led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Dr. Lew Gramer together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with Antigua researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. You can follow the team’s trip on their blog at https://mhab1-log.blogspot.com/.

● Patrick Mears is currently underway toward the ice of Antarctica as part of the GO-SHIP SO4P line in the Southern Ocean onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer.

● Ian Smith, Kelly Montenero, and Charline Quenee conducted a survey of juvenile sportfish and prey fish in Florida Bay on March 23-26. These cruises investigate how disturbances such as seagrass die-offs and hurricanes impact the juvenile sportfish and prey base in Florida Bay. They also have supported the development and continued enhancement of a performance measure that has been transitioned by the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess and evaluate the impacts of Everglades Restoration on Florida Bay.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble was in Washington DC to attend the NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions 9th Biennial Education and Science Forum on March 18-21. Chris presented AOML’s work on coastal resiliency at the meeting and hopes to build partnerships with PIs in the program to increase AOML’s EPP internships and partnerships.

● Dr. Libby Jewett, director of the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) visited AOML on Thursday March 22 from 6AM to 3 PM. The visit is part of the "bring your [favorite] program manager to work" program meant to provide managers and researchers a venue of informal exchanges and better insights into AOML capabilities and interests in support of ocean acidification research and goals. OAP funds activities in OCED and PhOD at a level of 1.2 M per year.

Small Boats

● Darel McCormick from the NOAA Small Boat Program came out to conduct an inspection on the R/V Cable March 21-23. This is a comprehensive, 3-year inspection that covers life-safety equipment, administration of the small boat program at AOML, the electrical, mechanical, and material condition of the vessel.

March 5, 2018

Workshops

● Dr. Chris Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley travelled to Saipan from March 5 - March 21 to conduct the second in a series of special technology transfer workshops on molecular Microbial Source Tracking (MST) for the Bureau of Environmental Coastal Quality (BECQ) of the US territory of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). These MST technology transfer workshops are intended to build state-of-the-art MST analytical capability at the CNMI BECQ to help them better protect and manage coral reef habitats and other critical coastal ecosystems. By combining the AOML MST training workshop with the American University stable isotope source tracking study, and the additional EPA support efforts for the BECQ, the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program is leveraging the capacity building at the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands with actual source tracking studies to provide actionable environmental intelligence for marine resource managers while establishing the CNMI BECQ as an on-going regional resource for this type of pollution source tracking technology.

Fieldwork

● Albert Jones, from the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (5Cs), Dr. Pamela Fletcher from Sea Grant, and John Halas from Environmental Moorings, Inc., will join Joe Bishop, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong and Dr. Jim Hendee from OCED, to install the first CREWS buoy of Phase 2 in the year-long campaign to install the buoys at five sites in the Caribbean. The installation effort will be March 12 - 23rd, and will include installing mooring pins to the bottom, preparing the buoy electronics for deployment, eventual deployment at the final site at Monk's Head Reef in Antigua (17.015730o N, 61.872670o W), and conversations with locals in outreach efforts led by Dr. Fletcher to discuss the utility of the buoy data, as well as information on the maintenance aspects of the buoy. Once the data are retrieved at AOML, Mike Jankulak will oversee the posting of the data to a special open-access blog, and Lew Gramer, together with student intern Madison Soden, will oversee the collaboration with Antigua researchers and formulation and elicitation of ecological forecasts. The greater portion of funding is through 5Cs, although funding for information systems and data come from NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program, and from OCED's Coral Health and Monitoring Program. Sea Grant is providing salary support for Pamela Fletcher.

On the left is John Halasm EMI with a local diver from Department of the Environment, Antigua

● Patrick Mears is participating in the GO-SHIP SO4P line in the Southern Ocean onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer for 67 days at sea as a DIC analyst. The ship departs on March 9.

● Dr. Chris Kelble, Ian Smith, and Charline Quenee will be conducting a survey of south Florida’s coastal waters aboard the R/V Savannah for the south Florida Ecosystem Restoration Research Project on March 8-12.

● Ian Smith and Charline Quenee will be conducting a survey of juvenile sportfish and prey fish in Florida Bay in mid-March. These cruises investigate how disturbances such as seagrass die-offs and hurricanes impact the juvenile sportfish and prey base in Florida Bay. They also have supported the development and continued enhancement of a performance measure that has been transitioned by the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess and evaluate the impacts of Everglades Restoration on Florida Bay.

Meetings

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof, Kevin Sullivan and Dr. Denis Pierrot will attend a pCO2 sensor workshop organized by the Ocean Thematic Centre (OTC) of the European research infrastructure Integrated Carbon Observation System (ICOS), in Bergen, Norway on March 6-9.

Small Boats

● The new Dusky 25' research vessel is scheduled to be delivered to AOML on April 2nd. The vessel is being custom-built for the specific needs of OCED and will serve as a water chemistry and diving platform that is capable of operating in the Florida Keys, the Bahamas, and greater South Florida. The manufacturer has installed a side door for CTD operations, and they are currently installing a 4' fixed dive ladder, a Hardcover T-Top, and a brand-new suite of electronics. If you have any questions on capabilities or future work on this vessel, please contact Dr. Chris Kelble or Ben VanDine.

February 26, 2018

Bon Voyage

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano has accepted a FTE position as the lead Coral / Benthic Biologist of the Environmental Division, US Army Corps of Engineers, with offices in Jacksonville, Florida. This new position will allow Xaymara to learn new skills in marine policy, environmental law and management, as well as use her knowledge and experience working with Florida reefs to help draft recommendations which may help minimize/mitigate ecosystem impacts. Most of the work Xaymara will conduct will be focused on SE Florida reefs so she expects to continue some of her collaborations with OCED scientists such as Drs. Jim Hendee, Chris Sinigalliano, Stephanie Rosales, Lew Gramer, Ruben van Hooidonk, Ian Enochs, and Derek Manzello. Xaymara is expected to begin her new position at the end of April.

Manuscripts

Dr. Ian Enochs and Dr. Derek Mazello co-authored a paper investigating the combined effect of elevated temperature and elevated pCO2 on the growth, survival, condition, and morphology of larvae of the commercially important Florida stone crab, Menippe mercenaria. This study investigated the combined effect of elevated temperature and elevated pCO2 on the growth, survival, condition, and morphology of larvae of the commercially important Florida stone crab, Menippe mercenaria. Elevated pCO2 resulted in a 37% decrease in survivorship relative to the control; however the effect of elevated temperature reduced larval survivorship by 71%. Exposure to both elevated temperature and pCO2 reduced larval survivorship by 80% relative to the control. Although elevated pCO2 could result in a reduction in larval supply, future increases in seawater temperatures are even more likely to threaten the future sustainability of the stone-crab fishery. The paper entitled "Warming and pCO2 effects on Florida stone crab larvae" was accepted for publication in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science.

Dr. Maribeth Gidley and Dr. Chris Sinigalliano co-authored a paper that evaluates long-term databases for impact of management on Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB). This was research was undertaken, because beach water monitoring programs identify poor water quality, but often the causes of the degradation are frequently unknown. The findings of this research have important policy implications because the selected beach management practices associated with low levels of FIB can be implemented in other parts of the US and around the world to improve recreational beach water quality. The lead author Elizabeth Kelly worked in our environmental microbiology lab as a doctoral student.

Announcements

● On Wednesday February 21, NOAA divers Dr. Jim Hendee, Dr. Derek Manzello, and LT Ben VanDine conducted 8 hours of dive training, including O2 administration and first aid, and rescue scenarios for divers in the water.

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be helping lead a tour of the Everglades.

Fieldwork

● Patrick Mears will be traveling to Australia this week to participate in the GO-SHIP SO4P line in the Southern Ocean onboard the USAP icebreaker, Nathaniel B. Palmer for 67 days at sea as a DIC analyst. The ship is scheduled to depart on March 9.

February 20, 2018

Welcome Aboard

● Dr. Kirsten J. Harper joined CIMAS this week to work with Dr. Kelly Goodwin on eDNA and eAUV development. Dr. Harper is originally from Glasgow, Scotland. She received an undergraduate degree in Marine and Freshwater Ecology from the University of Glasgow in 2007, a Masters of Research in Marine and Freshwater Ecology and Environmental Management from the University of Glasgow in 2009, and a PhD in Ecology focusing on Invasive Species from the University of Stirling in 2016. She has studied fiddler crabs in Indonesia, monitored nesting sea turtles in Cyprus, worked on coral disease in Tobago, and developed eDNA protocols for sea turtles in San Diego.

Manuscripts

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof is a co-author on a recently accepted paper that presents a means to assess multiple climate simulations in the Southern Ocean relative to the best available observations and observational products. The paper recommends standardization of observationally-based benchmarks that the modeling community should aspire to meet in order to reduce uncertainties in climate projections, and especially uncertainties related to oceanic heat and carbon uptake. The paper was a product of the US CLIVAR sponsored Southern Ocean Working Group (SOWG). It takes advantage of new observations and understanding that have allowed for progress in the creation of data/model metrics for the Southern Ocean. This is required to address the wide variability in global coupled climate model simulations of the Southern Ocean in response to ongoing anthropogenic trends.

Citation

● Russell, J. L., I. Kamenkovich, C. Bitz, R. Ferrari, S. T. Gille, P. J. Goodman, R. Hallberg, K. Johnson, K. Khazmutdinova, I. Marinov, M. Mazloff, S. Riser, J. L. Sarmiento, K. Speer, L. D. Talley and R. Wanninkhof. "Metrics for Evaluation of the Southern Ocean in Coupled Climate Models and Earth System Models." J. Geophys. Res. Paper #2017JC013461 (2018).

Announcements

● Dr. Pamela Fletcher, UF/IFAS-Florida Sea Grant laboratory liaison is conducting a needs assessment as part of AOML's Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) being led by Dr. James Hendee. Pamela is gathering information from stakeholders who are installing the early warning system monitoring buoys in 2018. The assessment is intended to identify individuals and organizations who will use the CREWS data for regional and local planning in the Caribbean. This project is funded by USAID and is managed by the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre. NOAA/AOML is providing technical expertise for buoy installation and stakeholder engagement to promote the use of data and information.

● Dr. Goodwin provided a lecture to Scripps Institute of Oceanography course "Graduate Marine Biotechnology" on February 13, 2018 and will provide a lecture for the UC San Diego course "Marine Microbiology" on February 26, 2018.

Meetings

● Dr. Pamela Fletcher, UF/IFAS-Florida Sea Grant laboratory liaison is hosting NOAA/OCM at UF/IFAS in Davie Feb 21 to 22 for the Planning for Meaningful Evaluation training. The training will be attended by academic, governmental and non-governmental participants involved in research and outreach projects. During this training, Pamela will be working with a group of UF colleagues focused on sea level resilience in South Florida. The team is using NOAA data and information in outreach programming and this training will assist in project planning.

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin will present a talk entitled "NOAA cross-line, interagency, and international engagement in ‘omics" at the NOAA Research Council meeting in Silver Spring, Maryland on February 20, 2018.

● Dr. Luke Thompson will attend the ’Omic Biomonitoring Workshop at the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Germany, at the Max Planck Institute from February 20-22, 2018. Dr. Thompson will give a talk entitled "Global characterization of microbial taxonomic and functional diversity in the Earth Microbiome Project." Dr. Kelly Goodwin will remotely present a talk entitled "NOAA ‘omics research and efforts to transition into management applications and operational observations" at the Workshop on Enhancing Interoperability & Coordination of Long-term ‘Omics Observations in Bremen, Germany on February 21, 2018.

February 13, 2018

Meetings

● OCED’s Dr. Derek Manzello is attending the Ocean Sciences Meeting in Portland, Oregon where he will give a talk entitled: "Local Adaptation and/or Acclimatization to Suboptimal Environmental Conditions on Inshore Patch Reefs in the Florida Keys Leads to Bleaching Resistance and Resilience."

February 5, 2018

Proposals

● Dr. Chris Kelble is co-PI on a project led by Dr. Jen Rehage at Florida International University that was selected for funding by the National Parks Service’s Cooperative Ecosystem Study Initiative. The project entitled "Effects of freshwater inflows and seagrass die-off on recreational fisheries: A trophic & movement ecology approach" will supplement the ongoing juvenile sportfish research in Florida Bay by enabling us to conduct more cruises and more fully process the samples we collect.

Field Work

● Kevin Sullivan and Patrick Mears are traveling to Charleston, South Carolina on February 6-8 to reinstall underway analytical equipment aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown as part of the Ship of Opportunity CO2 (SOOP-CO2) program.

Meetings

● Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong gave an oral presentation on the topic of "Advanced Environmental Technologies" at a meeting of the Thai government at Clearwater Beach, Florida on January 25-28, 2018. He met with the Deputy Prime Minister of Thailand, the Minister of Science and Technology, the Deputy Minister of Education and several other key people from the Thai government. The principal aim of this conference was to provide a forum for exploring strategies for developing human intellectual capital for Thailand 4.0 in the next decade. The conference focused on four key enabling technologies required for Thailand 4.0, namely: smart sensors, energy storages, bio-data science and technology, and water resources management and technology.

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be attending the first meeting of the SCOR Working group on integrating bio-optics and plankton enumeration into established global ocean surveys such as GO-SHIP (P-OBS) on Saturday, Feb. 10 in Portland, Oregon.

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof and Dr. Denis Pierrot will be leading a workshop on establishing a Global Observing Network for Reference Surface Water pCO2 Observations. The workshop is organized by the the International Ocean Carbon Coordination project (IOCCP). The IOCCP is a joint project of the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research and Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO and an affiliate program of the Global Carbon Project. This workshop takes place on Sunday, Feb. 11 in Portland, Oregon.

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin will provide updates about ‘omics, including National Microbiome Initiative implementation, to the NOAA Research Council on February 20, 2018, and during a talk to be provided to the AtlantOS/Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Workshop on Enhancing the Interoperability and Coordination of Long-term Omic Observatories to be held at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Germany during February 21-23, 2018.

January 29, 2018

Awards and Honors

"Ocean acidification enhances the bioerosion of a common coral reef sponge: implications for the persistence of the Florida Reef Tract" by Dr. Ian Enochs, Dr. Derek Manzello, and Graham Kolodziej is the most cited paper published in the Bulletin of Marine Science in the last three years. The paper describes accelerated erosion of reef frameworks by a bioeroding sponge under ocean acidification conditions and models the impacts on coral reef permanence in the Florida Keys. RSMAS Bulletin of Marine Science.

● Two papers by OCED authors were selected by AOML to be put forward as their nominations for the OAR best paper award. Dr. Luke Thompson and Dr. Kelly Goodwin’s paper, "A communal catalogue reveals Earth’s multiscale microbial diversity," was selected as the AOML nominee for Oceans and Great Lakes and Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk’s paper, "Local-scale projections of coral reef futures and implications of the Paris Agreement," was selected as the AOML nominee for Climate.

Citations

Thompson, L. R., Sanders, J. G., McDonald, D., Amir, A., Ladau, J., Locey, K. J., Prill, R. J., Tripathi, A., Gibbons, S. M., Ackermann, G., Navas-Molina, J. A., Janssen, S., Kopylova, E., Vázquez-Baeza, Y., González, A., Morton, J. T., Mirarab, S., Xu, Z. Z., Jiang, L., Haroon, M. F., Kanbar, J., Zhu, Q., Song, S., Kosciolek, T., Bokulich, N. A., Lefler, J., Brislawn, C. J., Humphrey, G. C., Owens, S. M., Hampton-Marcell, J., Berg-Lyons, D., McKenzie, V., Fierer, N., Fuhrman, J. A., Clauset, A., Stevens, R. L., Shade, A., Pollard, K. S., Goodwin, K. D., Jansson, J. K., Gilbert, J. A., Knight, R., and The Earth Microbiome Project Consortium. (2017). A communal catalogue reveals Earth’s multiscale microbial diversity. Nature, 551(7681), 457–463, doi:10.1038/nature24621.

van Hooidonk, R. J., Maynard, J., and Tamelander, J. (2016). Local-scale projections of coral reef futures and implications of the Paris Agreement. Scientific Reports. (https://www.nature.com/articles/srep39666).

Field Work

● The AOML microbiology team will be conducting field sampling operations next week in the Florida Keys for the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) and the Coral Genomic Observing Network (CGON). Dr. Paul Jones, Dr. Maribeth Gidley, and Ben Vandine will be collecting coral tissue samples, reef sediment samples, and reef water samples from six sentinel reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary for microbiome genomic characterization on Jan 30 - Feb 1, 2018.

● Kevin Sullivan and Patrick Mears are traveling to Charleston, South Carolina on February 6-8 to reinstall underway analytical equipment aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown as part of the Ship of Opportunity CO2 (SOOP-CO2) program.

Meetings

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin will provide updates about 'omics, including National Microbiome Initiative implementation, to the Interagency Biodiversity Ad Hoc Working Group on January 25, 2018, to the NOAA Research Council on February 20, 2018, and during a talk to be provided to the the AtlantOS/Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Workshop on Enhancing the Interoperability and Coordination of Long-term Omic Observatories to be held at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Germany during February 21-23, 2018 . She will present "Meta-omics off the US Pacific Coast and Beyond" during the US-Japan Living Marine Resources Bilateral in Hawaii January 29-30, 2018.

● Dr. Chris Kelble is participating in the "Science support to Biscayne National Park: imagining a healthier and more valuable Biscayne Bay, and then making it so" on Monday and Tuesday, January 29-30. The meeting is being hosted at BNP headquarters on Monday and at AOML on Tuesday. It is being put on by the Pew Fellows in collaboration with the Hoover Foundation.

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley has been invited to present a talk on the subject "Current and Future Health Concerns Associated with Rising Seas and a Changing Climate" at the University of Miami's Cooper Fellowship Training Symposium, "Empowering Capable Climate Communicators" on Saturday, February 3, 2018.

Seminar

● Dr. Stephanie Rosales will be giving a seminar on January 31st at 10AM in the first floor conference room at AOML entitled "Investigating the importance of microbial communities in marine mammals and coral reefs using omics."
Abstract: Marine mammals are top predators that are essential for the health and function of our oceans. These top predators are often affected by various factors that can be detrimental to their populations. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate undetermined causes of deaths and to better understand known diseases in marine mammals to mitigate future mortality events. In this talk, she will present some of her dissertation work that looked at a harbor seal mortality event caused by an unknown brain disease and the use of omics techniques to investigate the cause of death. She will also present her research from AOML looking at Southeast Florida Coral Initiative (SEFCRI) coral microbiome data. She will showcase the collaborative effort to correlate coral microbiome community changes to physical oceanographic conditions in four coral reefs sites. This is an effort to establish ideal environmental locations for corals and their microbiomes, which may aid in their survival. Additionally, she will talk about future projects and some of her community involvement efforts.

Updates

● Dr. Stephanie Rosales has started volunteering with Code/Art a Miami-based non-profit organization that aims to teach girls to code with the goal of increasing the number of women in computer science related fields. Stephanie presented at iPrep school which hosts one of Code/Art's after-school clubs. There, she introduced the students to bioinformatics and went through a short microbiome module.

● Dr. Stephanie Rosales, in collaboration with Dr. Ross Cunning and Dr. Michael Schmale at RSMAS, hosted the first bioinformatics meeting on Friday, January 19 to connect scientists from NOAA and RSMAS that are using bioinformatics for their research. If you are interested in participating in these bioinformatics meetings, please contact Stephanie.

● The NOAA Fisheries Southeast Regional Office (SERO) requested the assistance of Dr. Lew Gramer to review the particle tracking and sediment transport models the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is developing for the Port Everglades Navigation Improvement Project. The USACE is developing the models to evaluate impacts to coral and coral reef habitat from the dredging needed to deepen and lengthen the Port’s Entrance Channel. Model results will be critical to consultations the USACE will pursue with SERO under the Endangered Species Act and Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. Specially, these consultations will examine the predicted spatial extent and amounts of sediment accumulation on coral and coral reef habitat from the dredging and transport of dredged material during and up to a year after dredging ceases.

January 8, 2018

Meetings

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin will participate in the (virtual) Second Environmental DNA Technical Exchange Workshop January 9-10, 2018.

Visitors

● Dr. Kathy Tedesco, program manager for the OOMD/CPO/OAR sponsored GO-SHIP, XBT, and Ship of opportunity CO2 program will be visiting AOML January 11 and 12.

Outreach

● On Wednesday Jan 10th, Dr. Paul Jones will be giving a lecture at the Smithsonian Marine Station in Fort Pierce as part of their Marine Science in the Morning lecture series. The title of the talk is "Caribbean Cooking: Impacts of warming coastal waters on coral reefs of the Florida Keys and beyond".

Manuscripts

● Dr. Leticia Barbero is a contributing author of Chapter 16, Coastal Oceans and Continental Shelves of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2). The public comment period was completed January 8. This authoritative report considers relevant carbon-management science perspectives and science-based tools for supporting and informing decisions for North America with emphasis on the USA. SOCCR-2 also provides a status of, and emerging opportunities for, improving measurements, observations, and projections of carbon inventories and fluxes and identifies their uncertainty.

● Dr. Ian Enochs, Dr. Derek Manzello, and Dr. Renee Carlton are co-author of a landmark paper, "Taking the metabolic pulse of the world’s coral reefs". It has been accepted for publication in PLOS One.

Citation

● Cyronak T, Andersson A, Langdon C, Albright R, Bates N, Caldeira K, Carlton R, Corredor J, Dunbar R, Enochs I, Erez B, Eyre B, Gattuso J-P, Gledhill D, Kayanne H, Kline D, Koweek D, Lantz C, Lazar B, Manzello DP, McMahon A, Melendez M, Page H, Santos I, Schulz K, Shaw E, Jacobs, Suzuki A, Teneva L, Watanabe A, Yamamoto S. paper, "Taking the metabolic pulse of the world’s coral reefs (In Press). PLoS One.

December 26, 2017

Field Work

● Dr. Nicole Millette, Sierra Sarkis, and Dr. Chris Kelble will be participating in a South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Research cruise aboard the R/V Walton Smith from January 8-12. This cruise will continue sampling water quality, carbon chemistry, and biological oceanographic parameters around the Florida Keys, in addition to the Marine Biodiversity Observing Network sampling at 3 sites. This will be the first cruise with grazing incubation experiments being conducted simultaneously with primary productivity.

● Ian Smith will be conducting a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on January 3-6, 2018. This is a continuation of the study following a large cohort of juvenile spotted seatrout that were spawned during Hurricane Irma. We are working with colleagues with data on juvenile snook and red drum that show similar spawning events around Hurricane Irma.

December 18, 2017

Meetings

● Dr. Lew Gramer represented AOML and CIMAS at the European Coral Reef Symposium 2017 at Oxford University, 13-15 December. He chaired a session on research that combines modeling and other biophysical methods with molecular biology of the coral holobiont. Dr. Gramer also presented a 14-minute speed talk at ECRS on the relationship between oceanographic habitat and structure in the host genetics and microbiome of Florida reef corals - representing collaborative work with Nathan Putman, Xaymara Serrano, and the OCED marine microbiology lab including Stephanie Rosales. Reef scientists of Europe, Australia and the Pacific, the Middle East, Asia, South America (and some from North America, too!) presented talks in about 20 different sessions at the ancient university.

December 11, 2017

Field Work

● Ian Smith, Charline Quenee, and Dr. Chris Kelble will conduct an additional survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on December 9-14. These surveys typically end in November, but we have observed an unusually high pulse of juvenile seatrout this year following Hurricane Irma and will continue to track this cohort until we cease to observe it in significant numbers.

● The AOML microbiology team is sampling this week in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary to collect coral tissue, sediment, and water samples for coral reef microbiome biodiversity characterization as part of the on-going FKNMS Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON).

Seminar

● EBM Seminar Series: Dr. Chris Kelble will be presenting a talk on "Applying the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment process to inform EBM in the Gulf of Mexico" as part of the EBM/EBFM seminar series. This talk will be in the first floor conference room on Wed, December 13 from 3pm – 4pm. It will be transmitted to NOAA’s central library in Silver Spring and available via webinar. Dr. Kelble will discuss how Integrated Ecosystem Assessments (IEA) have evolved throughout NOAA with a specific focus on the Gulf of Mexico (GOMx). IEA's were originally viewed and communicated as a product, process, framework, and tool. This led to the Gulf of Mexico team implementing the IEA to answer big questions about the holistic status of the entire Gulf of Mexico. This advanced our scientific understanding, but the connection to ecosystem management was missing. We are now tailoring the GOMx IEA implementation in conjunction with management partners to support specific management processes. This has required the team to change the geographic scale of the IEA and work jointly with our management partners when creating IEA products. Dr. Kelble will highlight how the IEA has advanced our understanding of the GOMx ecosystem and is working actively with resource management partners to improve decision-making.

● Remote access: If you are located outside of Silver Spring, MD., please register for the December EBM/EBFM seminar: https://goo.gl/AsFkcdhttps://goo.gl/AsFkcd. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Participants can use their telephone OR computer mic and speakers (VoIP).

Project Updates

● Ocean carbon group personnel have built a new total dissolved inorganic CO2 (DIC) analyzer (DICE-6). The state-of–the-art instrument is the backbone of sustained ocean carbon observations. The new instrument is needed because the delay of the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown to execute GO-SHIP cruise in the Indian Ocean precludes getting equipment back for a coastal ocean acidification cruise.

● The closely interacting AOML and PMEL ocean carbon groups have been responsible for the reference quality measurements of DIC on the repeat hydrographic surveys since the early 1990s and currently are the only groups performing the measurements on the jointly NOAA/NSF funded US GO-SHIP cruises. The measurements are key to determine decadal changes in ocean carbon inventory and the resulting biogeochemical effects such as global ocean acidification. Over the years the groups have acquired unique expertise to lead the charge from the building and improving the exacting analytical instruments though data reduction and interpretation of global and coastal observations in support of NOAA goals.

December 4, 2017

Publications

● Dr. Ian Enochs, Graham Kolodziej, and Dr. Derek Manzello are co-authors on a manuscript accepted for publication in Coral Reefs.

Summary/Significance

● Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) are deep reefs (>30m) that may act as refuges for reef organisms owing to cooler temperatures and buffering from direct human impacts. However, MCE coral community recovery after disturbance, and thus, community resilience, are poorly understood. Coral growth rate is a key variable in resilience to disturbance, but there are limited data from MCEs. We used computerized tomography to quantify calcification in two species of coral and found that growth rates are slow in MCEs. Localized buffering from the stressors affecting shallow reefs is crucial to the long-term capacity of these sites to serve as refugia, given that growth and recovery from disturbance in MCEs will be significantly slower than on shallow reefs.

Citation

● Groves S, Holstein D, Enochs I, Kolodziej G, Manzello D, Brandt M, Smith TB (In press). Growth rates of Porites astreoides and Orbicella franksi in mesophotic habitats surrounding St. Thomas. Coral Reefs.

Seminar

● Dr. Catalina Aguilar will give the following seminar in the AOML first floor conference room on Tuesday, December 5 at 10AM: Transcriptomic analyses of the responses of corals to environmental stress. Understanding the impacts that environmental stressors have on the coral cellular mechanisms is integral for determining the status of coral health. It also has important implications for persistence of coral reefs under rapidly changing climatic conditions. In this study we implemented a transcriptomic approach to investigate the response of the coral A. millepora to biotic and abiotic challenges in an attempt to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying specific and general coral stress responses.

Project Update

● The AOML microbiology team is conducting technology transfer activities with the PALL Corporation, specifically their GeneDisc Division, to adapt microbial source tracking (MST) assays to their simple and user-friendly Genedisc quantitative PCR instrument. One of the challenges of advancing this MST technology for wide-spread use in environmental assessment and monitoring is the current need for relatively sophisticated laboratory equipment and highly trained personnel. The AOML Microbiology Program is working with the PALL corporation to develop versions of these qPCR assays and to modify the PALL Genedisc System so that these MST assays can be provided in pre-prepared kits and run on an automated instrument that requires relatively little manual operation or operator training. To this end, PALL has installed a GeneDisc qPCR system in the AOML microbiology lab that will be used in collaborative research and technology transfer activities to jointly adapt these assays to the instrument and to perform multi-laboratory cross-validation of assay performance on this instrument platform. The ultimate goal of this technology transfer effort is to foster wider use of this microbial source tracking qPCR technology among commercial, academic, governmental, and NGO entities by making it more cost-effective and simpler to use to better enable the acquisition of environmental intelligence that can improve resource management, mitigation, and recovery.

Meetings

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin and Luke Thompson will attend the 2017 CalCOFI conference to be held Dec. 4-6. A talk describing the integration of 'omic measurements into CalCOFI will be provided by JCVI collaborator Lisa Zeigler Allen. The talk is entitled "Exploring ‘Omic Technologies to Support Ecosystem Understanding and Fisheries Assessments" by L. Zeigler Allen, A. Rabines, J.P. McCrow, H. Zheng, K. Goodwin, M.L. Bohan, A.E. Allen.

● On December 13-15, 2017, Dr. Lew Gramer will present at the European Coral Reef Symposium in Oxford, U.K., on "Drivers of Reef Microbiome Community Structure". He will also co-chair the ECRS Session entitled, "Emerging techniques in reef studies: DNA-based approaches and beyond".

Outreach and Education

● Dr. Chris Kelble will serve as a panelist at an upcoming public event on sea level rise and water quality in Biscayne Bay at Vizcaya on Saturday, December 2nd. This event is part of our 2017-2018 Science Panel and Art Series put on by FIU’s School of Environment, Arts and Society.

● Dr. Stephanie Rosales gave a talk last Friday on "The use of omics in marine systems" at Nova Southeastern University.

Field Work

● The AOML microbiology team is sampling this week in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary to collect coral tissue, sediment, and water samples for coral reef microbiome biodiversity characterization as part of the on-going FKNMS Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON).

November 27, 2017

AOML Hosts NOAA 'Omics Meeting

● AOML hosted a meeting on ‘omics on November 21. This meeting was attended by AOML, PMEL, and OER scientists, NMFS chief scientist, Dr. Cisco Werner, NMFS director of science and technology, Dr. Ned Cyr, OAR Deputy Assistant Administrator for labs and Cooperative Institutes, Dr. Gary Matlock, and scientists from NOS with resource managers participating remotely. This meeting highlighted ‘omics work being conducted throughout NOAA, including at AOML. AOML’s presented research focused on increasing our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for coral resilience to disease, ocean acidification, and temperature and on developing empirical living marine resource models using ‘omics. These presentations provided an overview of NOAA’s ‘omics research that was followed by a discussion of what the future of ‘omics would be within NOAA. This included developing a timeline for when specific ‘omics applications would be operational or ready for use in resource management decision-making. There is a goal and expectation that ‘omics will be used in fisheries stock assessments within five-years and used by NOS for coral restoration decision-making starting immediately. Dr. Kelly Goodwin will be leading the development of a workshop report from this meeting.

Project Update

● On November 22 2107, Jack Stamates, Dr. Paul Jones, Dr. Maribeth Gidley and Madison Soden retrieved 28 temperature loggers that had been placed on Broward county recreational mooring buoys. This deployment was an operational test of the low cost temperature sensors developed by Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong. The temperature sensors were placed at the top and bottom to the morning lines to measure temperature variability across the reef tract. Analysis of this data will be performed by Dr. Lew Gramer and by Andrea Gomez as part of her CREST internship at AOML.

Meetings

● On November 28th and 29th, Jack Stamates will attend a meeting of the Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative-technical advisory committee. Jack will present results from a circulation study done near the St. Lucie Inlet.

Outreach and Education

● Dr. Chris Kelble will serve as a panelist at an upcoming public event on sea level rise and water quality in Biscayne Bay at Vizcaya on Saturday, December 2nd. This event is part of our 2017-2018 Science Panel and Art Series put on by FIU’s School of Environment, Arts and Society.

AOML Acknowledgement in Talks and Presentations

● All OCED scientists (both FTE and CIMAS) should have a NOAA logo on all of their talks and acknowledge their work location as AOML. CIMAS researchers, it is important that when you give presentations or identify yourself that you include your AOML affiliation in addition to UM.

November 20, 2017

AOML 'Omics Meeting - November 21 in the 1st Floor Conference Room

● This meeting will highlight the AOML 'omics program with the aim of fostering linkages among projects and programs to leverage resources and help transition research to applications. Ignite talks will be used to highlight scientific progress, complemented with programmatic overviews. Ignite talks will cover 'omics activities across the fields of coral, fisheries, biodiversity, and microbial science, as well as modeling and bioinformatics. The expectation is that participants will garner a better appreciation for various mission/program mandates and learn about some of NOAA’s 'omics activities across the fields of coral, fisheries, biodiversity, microbial, and computer science. The aim is to provide networking opportunities for all levels – including postdoctoral students that form the core of the (newly minted) bioinformatics user group, field scientists working to move interdisciplinary research to useful outcomes, and leadership looking for synergies that complement and enhance program success. The AOML ‘omics program arises in part from a formal effort initiated in ~2013 to enhance collaborative activities between OAR & NMFS under a series of themes, including “Genomics”; providing a bridge to tri-lateral collaboration with NOS is a meeting goal.

Meetings

● On December 13-15, 2017, Dr. Lew Gramer will present at the European Coral Reef Symposium in Oxford, U.K., on "Drivers of Reef Microbiome Community Structure: ". He will also co-chair the ECRS Session entitled, "Emerging techniques in reef studies: DNA-based approaches and beyond".

Project Update

● On November 14, Dr. Jim Hendee, Dr. Pamela Fletcher of Florida Sea Grant, Albert Jones of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center (Belize), and John Halas of Environmental Moorings International, met with over a dozen representatives of the Grenadian government, environmentally concerned NGOs, and academia to discuss the CREWS project, their plans for engaging with them during the project, and to discuss possible sites for the CREWS buoy installation. The next day, two candidate sites were chosen for exploration: Lower Boss Reef (12° 02.058'N, 61° 46.717' W), and Kahonee Reef (12° 01.365' N, 61° 47.459' W) the latter of which is near a St. George's University Diadema research site, Purple Rain Reef. Further discussion with the stakeholders will reveal which is the best site before installation of the station in 2018.

November 13, 2017

Meetings

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be presenting an overview on standard operating procedures (SOP) for surface water CO2 observations at JCOMMOCG and IODE workshop on “Evolving and Sustaining Ocean Best Practices” in Paris, November 15. During the same trip, he will participate in the second Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting of the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS), part of the European Research Infrastructure Consortia (ERIC), which will be held at the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office Brussels, on November 16-17, 2017.

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be hosting a meeting Tuesday morning at 9AM in the second Floor Conference Room with other researchers to discuss the impact of Hurricane Irma on coastal water quality in South Florida.

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be hosting a meeting on Friday to discuss the evaluation of hydrodynamic model results in Biscayne Bay.

● On December 13-15, 2017, Dr. Lew Gramer will present at the European Coral Reef Symposium in Oxford, U.K., on "Drivers of Reef Microbiome Community Structure: ". He will also co-chair the ECRS Session entitled, "Emerging techniques in reef studies: DNA-based approaches and beyond".

Project Updates

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin joined Dr. Craig McLean (OAR AA & NOAA Acting Chief Scientist) and Knauss Fellow Molly Semones for two fascinating 'omic discussions. Meetings with Rob Knight (UCSD, Center for Microbiome Innovation) and with Craig Venter (J. Craig Venter Institute) were arranged for Dr. McLean during his visit to San Diego for Blue Tech week.

● During the months of November and December, Dr. Xaymara Serrano has been/will be working in the molecular laboratory of Dr. Nikki Traylor-Knowles at RSMAS with samples collected from field disease assays conducted in the summer in the Florida Keys. Dr. Serrano is performing RNA extractions and preparing cDNA libraries for future sequencing, with the overall goal of using these techniques to asssess the genomic basis of disease resistance in two critically important Caribbean corals (Acropora palmata and A. cervicornis).

Thesis Defense

● Philip Bellamy will be defending his M.S. Thesis, "A GIS tool for determining the potential runoff coefficient and runoff depth for the Indian River Lagoon, FL," at Bethune Cookman University on Thursday, November 16. Philip is currently completing his 12-week NOAA Experiential Research & Training Opportunities (NERTO) within OCED working on using GIS techniques to beeter understand land-based nutrient sources in the Coral Gables waterway.

Outreach and Education

● Dr. Nicole Millette and Dr. Chris Kelble will be briefing the Biscayne Bay Regional Restoration Coordination Team on Wednesday, November 15. They will be updating the team on their efforts associated with the Biscayne Bay Habitat Focus Area. Dr. Millette will be discussing long-term trends in water quality throughout Biscayne Bay and Dr. Kelble will be presenting preliminary results from our intensive study of the Coral Gables waterway.

● Dr. Chris Kelble will serve as a panelist at an upcoming public event on sea level rise and water quality in Biscayne Bay at Vizcaya on Saturday, December 2. This event is part of our 2017-2018 Science Panel and Art Series put on by FIU’s School of Environment, Arts and Society.

NOAA Miami Health Fair

On Friday, Nov. 17th from 10-2PM, AOML will host the NOAA Miami Health Fair in the AOML Lobby and 1st floor conference room.

November 6, 2017

Farewell

Lindsey Visser has left OCED to take a position as supervisory chemist with Broward County. Lindsey lead the field and laboratory activities for the Ecosystem Assessment team for the past 5-years. Her last day at AOML was Thursday, November 5. We wish Lindsey the best of luck in her new position.

Manuscripts

● Dr. Luke Thompson gave a presentation and Dr. Kelly Goodwin attended the Earth Microbiome Project Mini-symposium held at UC San Diego on November 1. The symposium coincided with the on-line release of the publication "A communal catalogue reveals Earth’s multiscale microbial diversity" in Nature, by Luke R. Thompson, Jon G. Sanders, Daniel McDonald, Amnon Amir, Joshua Ladau, Kenneth J. Locey, Robert J. Prill, Anupriya Tripathi, Sean M. Gibbons, Gail Ackermann , Jose A. Navas-Molina, Stefan Janssen, Evguenia Kopylova, Yoshiki Vázquez-Baeza, Antonio González, James T. Morton, Siavash Mirarab, Zhenjiang Zech Xu, Lingjing Jiang, Mohamed F. Haroon, Jad Kanbar, Qiyun Zhu, Se Jin Song, Tomasz Kosciolek, Nicholas A. Bokulich, Joshua Lefler, Colin J. Brislawn, Gregory Humphrey, Sarah M. Owens, Jarrad Hampton-Marcell, Donna Berg-Lyons, Valerie McKenzie, Noah Fierer, Jed A. Fuhrman, Aaron Clauset, Rick L. Stevens, Ashley Shade, Katherine S. Pollard, Kelly D. Goodwin, Janet K. Jansson, Jack A. Gilbert, Rob Knight and The Earth Microbiome Project Consortium.

● Dr. Jia-Zhong Zhang authored a paper entitled "An estimate of diapycnal nutrient fluxes to the euphotic zone in the Florida Straits" that has been accepted for publication in Scientific Reports. Co-authors on the paper are Charlies Fischer (OCED), Molly Baringer (OD), and Jay Hooper (PhOD). The paper estimates nutrient fluxes in coastal waters of the Florida Straits using nutrient profiles and published diffusivity. The estimated fluxes are 100 times higher in the coastal areas than the central are of the Florida Straits.

Fieldwork

● Ian Smith, Dylan Sinnickson, and Dr. Chris Kelble conducted a follow-up survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on November 10-14. During the October survey they collected a record number of small juvenile spotted seatrout that likely spawned either shortly before or after the passage of Hurricane Irma. This follow-up survey will aim to observe if that high population of juveniles has survived.

Meetings

● Dr. Derek Manzello was an invited participant at a workshop entitled "Biogeographic contrast of coral reef community resilience and response to Ocean Acidification (OA) in Mo’orea, French Polynesia, and the Eastern Tropical Pacific (Galapagos, Panama)" from Nov 10-13, 2017 on Catalina Island, CA. The meeting took place at the USC Wrigley Boone Center and was hosted by Dr. Peter Edmunds of Cal-State Northridge and Dr. Peggy Fong of UCLA. The goals are to bring together the key researchers of NSF's long-term monitoring efforts in French Polynesia and the eastern tropical Pacific to align efforts for OA ecosystem response monitoring. This will be a cross-fertilization of the NOAA OA eco-response monitoring as part of the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program with NSF's efforts.

Project Updates

● Graham Kolodziej, Nathan Formel, and Dr. Ian Enochs conducted research in the Florida Keys, deploying instruments and collecting bioeroding sponges for an upcoming experiment in the Experimental Reef Lab.

● Philip Bellamy ran the first trial of ordinary least squares tests on the water quality parameters for the Coral Gables Waterway. He is in the process of applying the correct transformations to produce a normally distributed dataset for reliable results.

Outreach and Education

● The Angari Foundation filmed John Morris scanning coral cores in the AOML CT scanning facility. The footage will be part of a virtual reality documentary and teaching tool on ACCRETE research.

October 30, 2017

Welcome Aboard

Madison Soden started with OCED through CIMAS. Lew Gramer will be mentoring Madison, who is working on a Master's Degree (double) in Physics and Mathematics. Madison will be working to incorporate and improve the use of AI tools for coral ecology. OCED's interest and adoption of artificial intelligence (A.I.) tools began in the mid-90s with Jim Hendee's expert system implementation of the CREWS software which utilized (back then) the CLIPS programming language developed by NASA for the space station. This tool was then greatly enhanced through the programming efforts of Mike Jankulak and Lew Gramer, utilizing a commercial expert system shell called G2 (funded by HPCC), which was at the time used by many of the Fortune 500 companies, as well as the NSA, the CIA and the FBI. Unfortunately, that software has become too expensive and time-consuming to update and maintain, so we are transitioning to two candidate approaches that utilize the Python programming language, i.e., PyKE (i.e., Python for Knowledge Engines), and PyKnow. Madison is very keenly interested in developing this new approach to using artificial intelligence and will help with the transition of our current expert systems to the new programming language.

Manuscripts

● OCED's Dr. Xaymara Serrano is the lead author in a manuscript accepted for publication in the journal Coral Reefs. This paper investigated the performance of coral larvae from two important Caribbean species with contrasting reproductive and algal transmission modes (Orbicella faveolata and Porites astreoides), under increased temperature and/or elevated dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). The authors used a fluorescence-based respirometer to measure the oxygen consumption of coral larvae from both species, and also assessed the effects of these stressors on P. astreoides larval settlement and mortality. Findings suggest that the effects of thermal stress and nitrate enrichment in coral larvae may be species-specific and are neither additive nor synergistic for the species studied. Together, these findings may have important consequences for the recruitment and community reassembly of corals to nutrient-polluted reefs that have been impacted by climate change

Manuscript Citation

Xaymara M. Serrano>, Margaret W. Miller, James C. Hendee, Brittany A. Jensen, Justine Z. Gapayao, Christina Pasparakis, Martin Grosell, and Andrew C. Baker. Effects of thermal stress and nitrate enrichment on the larval performance of two Caribbean reef corals. Coral Reefs. Accepted.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble and Dr. Neda Trifonova attended the Putting Ocean Tipping Points into Practice workshop at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) in Santa Barabara, CA on November 1-3. Chris and Neda were part of a successful application with colleagues in the Office of Restoration and the Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment that aims to use socio-ecological indicators to look for tipping points that may have occurred in response to tropical cyclones and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin traveled to Washington DC on November 8-10 to participate in the National Microbiome Data Collaborative Colloquium.

Diversity, Inclusion and You: Coping with Natural Diasters Affinity Group

● Andrea Gomez, a NOAA-CREST Student Intern, finished her internship and departed AOML on October 27.

Project Updates

● Stephanie Rosales is starting to work on some artificial neural network-based data analysis in R and Python. She is developing her capabilities on our new powerful bioinformatics server (also funded by HPCC) and will use these tools to support our Omics program (as well as others). One of the methods Stephanie is experimenting with is the self-organizing map (SOM) or "Kohonen map". There are a number of implementations of SOMs in Python, some of which Lew has experimented with.

● Continuing on with the A.I. theme, Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong is also utilizing Python programming and investigating the use of the A.I. approach in analyzing our sea temperature sensor data, as well as for use in analyzing data that may arise in a future project from surface mounted sensors in real time.

Internal Review of Publications

● Please remember that all manuscripts and presentations at scientific conferences must undergo an internal review. There are forms that must be completed to keep a record to indicate that the internal review was successfully completed for both manuscripts and talks. AOML also now has an official internal review procedures. All of these documents and procedures can be found in our OCED forms and documents folder on the google drive (https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B4-XrZ8DMx4HODhvckdsRm1ZaHc?usp=sharing'> https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B4-XrZ8DMx4HODhvckdsRm1ZaHc?usp=sharing). If you need something to be reviewed, please contact Dr. Jim Hendee or Dr. Chris Kelble to help coordinate the internal review.

October 23, 2017

Manuscripts

● Dr. Nicole Millette authored a paper entitled "Shift in baseline chlorophyll a concentrations following a three-year Synechococcus bloom in southeastern Florida" that was accepted for publication in the Bulletin of Marine Science. Dr. Chris Kelble and Lindsey Visser are co-authors on the paper. Between 2005 and 2008 an unprecedented bloom of Synechococcus occurred in Barnes Sound, Manatee Bay, and lackwater Sound of southern Biscayne Bay. During the bloom, nutrient concentrations were elevated and massive seagrass mortality was reported. However, following the collapse of the bloom, there was minimal follow-up research to assess the status of the impacted region. By comparing water quality monitoring data collected ten years before and five years after the bloom, we identified a baseline shift in chlorophyll a concentrations that we confirmed was the result of the three-year bloom. More importantly, we could not find any other baseline shifts in water quality, specifically nutrients, that were caused by the bloom. As a result, we hypothesize that higher baseline chlorophyll a concentrations are the result of a reduced benthic (seagrass and sponge) community. This would mean that the Synechococcus bloom caused the affected region to shift towards a more pelagic production dominated community compared to benthic production and is at greater risk for future blooms. This manuscript was a result of collaboration between the AOML/NGI program and the Biscayne Bay Habitat Focus Area.

Manuscript Citation

Millette, NC, Kelble C, Linhoss A, Ashby S, and Visser L. Shift in baseline chlorophyll a concentrations following a three-year Synechococcus bloom in southeastern Florida. Bulletin of Marine Science.

Field Work

● Jack Stamates, Andrea Gomez, and Dr. Paul Jones will swap the temperature sensors located on the Broward County recreational mooring buoys on October 25. Thirty of these sensors were placed at the top and bottom of buoy mooring lines in August 2017, as a test of the low-cost temperature sensors developed at AOML by Dr. Natchanon Amornthammarong. The Broward County recreational mooring buoys have provided a platform of opportunity for deploying these temperatures sensors across a portion of the Broward reef tract. Data from the sensors will provide a high temporal density set of near surface and near bottom temperature measurements in this section of the reef tract. The data will be used to examine the small-scale variability across the reef tract, the effects of severe meteorological events on reef temperature, and to compare with space born oceanographic measurements.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble and Dr. Neda Trifonova will be attending the Putting Ocean Tipping Points into Practice workshop at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) in Santa Barabara, CA on November 1-3. Chris and Neda were part of a successful application with colleagues in the Office of Restoration and the Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment that aims to use socio-ecological indicators to look for tipping points that may have occurred in response to tropical cyclones and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

Outreach and Education

● Dr. Nicole Millette and Dr. Chris Kelble were featured in an article in the Miami Herald on Sunday that discussed the current and potential impacts of Hurricane Irma on the Biscayne Bay. The Biscayne Bay is a NOAA habitat focus area that AOML co-leads with SEFSC (http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/environment/article180281956.html).

Recent Announcements

● Dr. Jim Hendee of AOML, Albert Jones of Caribbean Community Climate Change Center, John Halas of Environmental Moorings, Int., and Dr. Pamela Fletcher of Sea Grant/AOML met with local stakeholders in St. Kitts to determine the best location for a Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station in St. Kitts or Nevis. Four sites were identified in subsequent site surveys for the installation of the CREWS station in 2018.

October 16, 2017

Hurricane Irma Assessment

OCED has completed several cruises to assess the impact of Hurricane Irma on south Florida’s coastal ecosystems. We had hypothesized that we might observe hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) in many areas, especially near the Everglades, due to an increase in organic matter loading to the coastal ecosystem. However, we found dissolved oxygen levels to be normal throughout the west Florida shelf. Salinities were lower in this area and there was a diatom bloom, but this is expected and not unprecedented when there is a high quantity of runoff from the Everglades. Florida Bay appears to be experiencing a phytoplankton bloom and is still turbid, but we found high densities of juvenile sportfish, likely because the lower salinities were physiological better for many species. Biscayne Bay has one area near Black Point with hypoxic conditions and throughout Biscayne Bay there were elevated chlorophyll a levels near the concentrations during the 2013 bloom. The lack of sever negative impacts to the coastal ecosystem from Hurricane Irma is expected. Coastal ecosystems in the southeast and Gulf of Mexico have evolved with tropical cyclones regularly impacting them. Thus, while we, humans, often expect intense tropical cyclones to have severe negative impacts on the ecology of coastal ecosystems, that is not usually the case. Instead, tropical cyclones tend to have a much more pronounced impact on humans and the built environment than they do on the coastal marine ecology.

Field Work

● Dr. Jim Hendee will conduct a site survey in St. Lucia on October 16-20. The survey will include meeting with local stakeholders to help identify the future location of the Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) buoy to be deployed in St. Lucia.

Outreach and Education

● Dr. Ruben Van Hooidonk did a read interview (taped) for BBC World with journalist Sam Judah about the future prospects of coral reefs under climate change. We do not know when it will air, but we’ll keep you updated.

New OCED Research Vessel

● Joe Bishop went to Dusky to check on progress of the new research vessel in production. The new vessel is out of the mold and being prepped for the cabin and the deck.

Meetings

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will be traveling to Salt Lake City, Utah, to participate in the 2017 SACNAS National Conference to be held from October 18-21. SACNAS is organized by the Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science and it is the largest diversity in STEM conference in the country, with over 4,000 attendees each year. Xaymara will represent AOML's Diversity Inclusion and You (DIY) committee and will serve as panelist in two different events; a student mentoring panel and a professional development session. Both are intended to increase and promote diversity of underrepresented minorities in science careers.

Diversity, Inclusion and You: Coping with Natural Diasters Affinity Group

● AOML's Diversity Inclusion and You (DYI) committee is forming its first affinity group for people who have been impacted by recent natural disasters (Harvey, Irma, Maria, earthquake in Mexico) or who have friends/families that have been impacted. A goal of the group will be to share resources and/or useful information which may help those affected, especially in hard-to-reach areas in the US/Caribbean. For anybody interested in joining this group, the point contact person is Dr. Xaymara Serrano from OCED (xaymara.serrano@noaa.gov). Once a group is formed a first meeting will be announced. In addition, if anybody is interested in setting up another affinity group or wish to join AOML's DIY, contact aoml.diversity@noaa.gov or any current member (Dr. Xaymara Serrano, Erica Rule, Dr. George Halliwell, Dr. Lew Gramer, Howie Friedman, Dr. Sean Casey, and Dr. Sim Aberson).

October 9, 2017

Publications

● Dr. Ruben Van Hooidonk is an author and co-author on two newly released UN reports. Ruben authored a report that details projections of coral bleaching conditions at a 4-km resolution per country based on his priori publication van Hooidonk RJ, Maynard J, Tamelander J et al. (2016). Local-scale projections of coral reef futures and implications of the Paris Agreement. Nature Publishing Group, 1–8.
( http://www.unep.org/asiapacific/sites/unep.org.asiapacific/files/CoralBleaching.pdf)

● Dr. Ruben co-authored a second report that is a guide for the individuals in charge of commissioning, planning, leading or coordinating a resilience assessment. The Guide also provides a resource for 'reef managers' of all kinds, including decision-makers, environmental planners and managers in coral reef areas, with influence over pressures affecting coral reefs.
( http://www.unep.org/asiapacific/sites/unep.org.asiapacific/files/AGuide-Coral%20Reef2017.pdf)

Recent Announcements

● Dr. Chris Kelble and Dr. Neda Trifonova along with colleagues submitted a successful application to participate in "Putting Tipping Points Science into Practice Workshop" at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). Their project entitled "Ocean Tipping Points to Improve Gulf of Mexico Restoration and Management" will integrate biophysical scientists, social scientists, and restoration managers in the Gulf of Mexico to determine if tipping points have been surpassed or are being approached and how mangers should use tipping points theory to improve the sustainability of Gulf of Mexico resources.

Field Work

OCED has been and will continue to conduct a number of cruises to assess the impact of Hurricane Irma on south Florida’s coastal ecosystems. We have developed a website (http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/ocd/ocdweb/irmaresearch/) to help AOML and our partners keep updated on and disseminate findings from the various field activities:

● NOAA/AOML, NOAA/NESDIS, USF, and University of Miami will conduct a survey of south Florida’s coastal waters on October 9-13, 2017 aboard the R/V Walton Smith. These cruises have been investigating coastal water quality in south Florida every other month since the late 1990s. This cruise is being enhanced and modified to better capture the response of south Florida coastal water quality to Hurricane Irma's passage on September 10-11, 2017. The main objectives of this cruise are to 1) Quantify the impact of Hurricane Irma on coastal water quality along the Florida Keys and southwest Florida shelf, and 2) Calibrate satellite measurements to be post-processed to provide a time-series of Hurricane Irma impacts on south Florida coastal waters. Parameters to be collected at each station or measured underway include Dissolved Inorganic Nutrients, Chlorophyll a, Dissolved Oxygen, Dissolved Inorganic Carbon, and fCO2. At select stations, we will collect samples to measure environmental DNA and Primary Productivity. We will be posting updates from the cruise as internet on board and timing allow.

● We have conducted three surveys of the Coral Gables waterway on September 23, 28 and October 5. The initial results from this survey are shown below. This will allow us to determine how Hurricane Irma affected the delivery of land-based nutrients to Biscayne Bay.

● We are in the process of conducting a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay to quantify the effect of Hurricane Irma on seagrasses and juvenile sportfish in our study site. This will help determine how juvenile fish responded to the Hurricane’s passage.

● We will conduct a survey of water quality in Biscayne Bay, a NOAA Habitat Focus Area, on October 11. This will determine the effect of Hurricane Irma on water quality throughout Biscayne Bay.

● Jim Hendee will conduct a site survey in St. Lucia on October 16-20. The survey will include meeting with local stakeholders to help identify the future location of the Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) buoy to be deployed in St. Lucia

Advanced Manufacturing Lab

Dr. Ian Enochs, Dr. Paul Jones, and Nate Formel finished construction of AOML's new Advanced Manufacturing Lab. The new facility expands AOML's capabilities in 3D printing, laser cutting and CNC, as well as printed circuit board production.

Impact of Hurricane Irma on Coral Gables Waterway Water Quality Initial Results

As part of the Biscayne Bay Habitat Focus area effort, AOML has been conducting monthly water quality sampling within the Coral Gables Waterway (Fig. 1). This sampling represents a collaborative partnership with AOML, SEFSC, and University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth. We sample 11 stations from the control structure on Red Road to the mouth of the waterway, where it enters Biscayne Bay (Fig. 1).

Hurricane Irma passed just to the west of this study site on September 10-11, 2017. The SFWMD operates the control structure at Red Road adjacent to our station CGW-11. SFWMD opened the control structure during Hurricane Irma’s passage to minimize flooding. The flow at the control structure was upstream from the Bay to the land the day before and during the first day of Hurricane Irma’s passage on September 9-10, 2017. This was likely due to the East winds before and during Irma’s early passage and it associated storm surge. On September 11, the second and heavier day of Irma’s passage, the highest flow was recorded during our study period as this water exited through the control structure to the Bay along with the rain runoff associated with the Hurricane (Fig. 2). Average daily flow remained above 100 cubic feet per second through September 14, 2017.

Thus far, our observations suggest that Hurricane Irma’s impact on the Coral Gables waterway and downstream Biscayne Bay was not severe. All parameters analyzed thus far, including salinity, chlorophyll a, and dissolved oxygen, are within the ranges we have already observed during the 2017 wet season (Fig. 3). This may be due to two factors: 1) the 2017 wet season is the wettest in 68-years, and 2) Hurricane Irma only resulted in 6-8 inches of total rainfall in Miami-Dade County.

October 2, 2017

Field Work

OCED has been and will continue to conduct a number of cruises to assess the impact of Hurricane Irma on south Florida’s coastal ecosystems. We have developed a website (http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/ocd/ocdweb/irmaresearch/) to help AOML and our partners keep updated on and disseminate findings from the various field activities:

● NOAA/AOML, NOAA/NESDIS, USF, and University of Miami will conduct a survey of south Florida’s coastal waters on October 9-13, 2017 aboard the R/V Walton Smith. These cruises have been investigating coastal water quality in south Florida every other month since the late 1990s. This cruise is being enhanced and modified to better capture the response of south Florida coastal water quality to Hurricane Irma's passage on September 10-11, 2017. The main objectives of this cruise are to 1) Quantify the impact of Hurricane Irma on coastal water quality along the Florida Keys and southwest Florida shelf, and 2) Calibrate satellite measurements to be post-processed to provide a time-series of Hurricane Irma impacts on south Florida coastal waters. Parameters to be collected at each station or measured underway include Dissolved Inorganic Nutrients, Chlorophyll a, Dissolved Oxygen, Dissolved Inorganic Carbon, and fCO2. At select stations, we will collect samples to measure environmental DNA and Primary Productivity. We will be posting updates from the cruise as internet on board and timing allow.

● We have conducted two surveys of the Coral Gables waterway on September 23 & 28. We intend to keep sampling the waterway weekly until conditions return to near baseline. This will allow us to determine how Hurricane Irma affected the delivery of land-based nutrients to Biscayne Bay.

● We will conduct a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay in the next two weeks to quantify the effect of Hurricane Irma on seagrasses and juvenile sportfish in our study site. This will help determine how juvenile fish responded to the Hurricane’s passage.

● We will conduct a survey of water quality in Biscayne Bay, a NOAA Habitat Focus Area, in the next 2 weeks. This will determine the effect of Hurrican Irma on water quality throughout Biscayne Bay.

Meetings

Dr. Kelly Goodwin will be speaking at TDWG 2017 Biodiversity Information Standards Conference in Ottawa, Canada in a session co-hosted by Luke Thompson. Dr. Goodwin's talk is entitled "Integrating Marine 'Omics into the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) in Support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and Agenda 2030". Co-authors include NOAA's Gabrielle Canonico, members of the Sanctuaries MBON team, and JCVI scientists. Dr. Goodwin will participate in the Data Carpentry Workshop while there TDWG is the Taxonomic Data Working Group which will cover data analysis and visualization in R and SQL for data management.

September 25, 2017

Welcome Aboard

● Philip Bellamy started his NOAA Experiential Research & Training Opportunities (NERTO) last Week with Dr. Chris Kelble. Philip comes to AOML from Bethune Cookman University where he will graduate in December with an MS in environmental science. Philip will be working on applying GIS to advance our understanding of eutrophication in Biscayne Bay as part of the Biscayne Bay Habitat Focus Area. .

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble will participate in a meeting to coordinate the assessment of ecosystem effects from Hurricane Irma in south Florida. If you plan to do anything to examine the impacts of Hurricane Irma on south Florida, please let Chris know of these activities, so he help coordinate them with other researchers. This meeting is being held as part of the Science Coordination Group for South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, on which Chris is a member.

● Dr. Luke Thompson participated remotely in the EuroMarine EMOSE 2017 Hackathon in Porto, Portugal, from September 11-15. As part of a working with a group of ~20 scientists, Dr. Thompson applied open-source tools to analyze marine metabarcoding data. The goal of the workshop was to identify best practices for data analysis for use in marine biodiversity estimates.

Field Work

● Lindsey Visser will be leading a survey of south Florida’s coastal waters on October 2-6 aboard the R/V Walton Smith. This cruise is one of our typical surveys, but will have an additional focus of trying to increase our understanding of Hurricane Irma’s impacts to south Florida coastal ecosystems. To do this, we are coordinating with Frank Muller-Karger at USF and NESDIS colleagues to include remote sensing surveys that will fly over the study area while we are sampling in situ. If you would like any samples taken during this cruise please let Dr. Chris Kelble know.

● Lindsey Visser, Dr. Chris Kelble, Philip Bellamy, and Ian Smith will be conducting concurrent surveys of Florida Bay water quality, seagrass, and juvenile sportfish populations on October 9-13. These surveys will help us to better understand how Hurricane Irma affected Florida Bay’s ecosystem.

September 18, 2017

Manuscripts

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof is co-author on manuscript 2017JC013461, "Metrics for the Evaluation of the Southern Ocean in Coupled Climate Models and Earth System Models", which has been submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans. The paper lead by Dr. J. Russell is the outcome of the special CLIVAR panel of the Southern Ocean Modelling Intercomparison Project. Dr. Rik Wanninkhof was a panel member.

Meetings

● A number of OCED scientists are attending the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea Annual Science Conference this week in Fort Lauderdale. Below are a list of presentations being given by these OCED scientists.

Title: Inclusion of DNA Sequencing into an Ecosystem Observing Program in the Southern California Bight
Authors: Kelly D. Goodwin, Lisa Zeigler Allen, Ariel Rabines, John McCrow, Andrew Allen

Title: The Earth Microbiome Project: lessons from a massive metagenetic survey
Authors: Luke R. Thompson, Jon G. Sanders, Daniel McDonald, Amnon Amir, Joshua Ladau, Kenneth J. Locey, Robert J. Prill, Anupriya Tripathi, Sean M. Gibbons, Gail Ackermann, Jose A. Navas- Molina, Evguenia Kopylova, Yoshiki Vázquez-Baeza, Stefan Janssen, James T. Morton, Siavash Mirarab, Zhenjiang Zech Xu, Mohamed F. Haroon, Jad Kanbar, Qiyun Zhu, Antonio Gonzalez, Se Jin Song, Tomasz Kosciolek, Nicholas A. Bokulich, Joshua Lefler, Colin J. Brislawn, Greg C. Humphrey, Sarah M. Owens, Jarrad Hampton-Marcell, Donna Berg-Lyons, Valerie McKenzie, Noah Fierer, Jed A. Fuhrman, Aaron Clauset, Rick L. Stevens, Ashley Shade, Katherine S. Pollard, Kelly D. Goodwin, Janet K. Jansson, Jack A. Gilbert, Rob Knight & The Earth Microbiome Project Consortium

Title: Measuring the response of ecosystem indicators to events
Authors: Christopher R. Kelble, Mandy Karnauskas, Neda Trifonova, Seann Regan

Title: The Use of Hidden Variable Dynamic Models to Detect Functional Changes in the Gulf of Mexico Marine Ecosystem
Authors: Neda Trifonova, Christopher Kelble, and Mandy Karnauskas

Title: The Integrated Coral Observing Network
Authors: James C. Hendee, John Halas, Michael Jankulak, Lew Gramer, Pamela Fletcher, Joe Bishop, and Natchanon Amornthammarong

September 5, 2017

Seminars

● Dr. Catalina Aguilar will give the following seminar in the AOML first floor conference room on Wednesday, September 6 at 10AM: Transcriptomic analyses of the responses of corals to environmental stress. Understanding the impacts that environmental stressors have on the coral cellular mechanisms is integral for determining the status of coral health. It also has important implications for persistence of coral reefs under rapidly changing climatic conditions. In this study we implemented a transcriptomic approach to investigate the response of the coral A. millepora to biotic and abiotic challenges in an attempt to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying specific and general coral stress responses.

Meetings

● Dr. Christopher Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley of the NOAA AOML Microbiology Program will be on travel to Saipan from Sept 1 to Sept 17 to conduct a technology transfer training workshop in molecular Microbial Source Tracking (MST) for the Bureau of Environmental Coastal Quality (BECQ) of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI - a US territory). This training workshop is the first of a series of anticipated MST workshops in Saipan funded by the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program. Coral reef managers in CNMI have expressed the need for improved methods to detect and track Land-Based Sources of Pollution impacting the coral reefs and other marine ecosystems of the region. The primary goal of this first MST training workshop to be held at the BECQ lab in Saipan from Sept 5 to Sept 15 is to inform natural resource managers, BECQ personnel, and regional collaborators about the state of the art of microbial source tracking, including its processes, applications, benefits, and limitations, to train the BECQ lab personnel in specific MST methods and techniques to track host-specific fecal bacteria in the environment, and to aid the BECQ in adapting its instrumentation and lab equipment to conduct this MST analysis for themselves. The goal for the CNMI BECQ training is that at the end of the series of training workshops, BECQ will have the expertise, equipment, and other necessary resources to run their own MST laboratory and to serve as an environmental MST analysis center for the region, to better aid in coral reef management and in mitigation of LBSP impacting these ecosystems. The workshop this year focuses on training, proficiency testing, and validating the BECQ lab for performance of these MST techniques, while the next two workshops during the wet and dry seasons of FY18 will focus on application of these MST methods to an LBSP tracking study funded by the NOAA CRCP in collaboration with both the BECQ and the American University in Guam that will combine both microbial source tracking and stable isotope source tracking to determine LBSP pathways and impacts for marine ecosystems in Saipan Lagoon and elsewhere in the CNMI. This work is expected to help CNMI environmental quality managers better understand and mitigate LBSP contamination patterns to improve coral reef health.

● Dr. Jim Hendee will conduct a site survey for a CREWS station in St. Kitts and Nevis during September 15 - 18.

Recent Accomplishments

● After giving their presentation to the Coral Gables City Commission last week, Dr. Chris Kelble and Roland Samimy were instructed by the commission to prepare a plan to increase our understanding of nutrient pollution in the waterway. The ultimate goal of this plan will be to evaluate strategies that the city could potentially implement to reduce nutrient runoff into the waterway and ultimately Biscayne Bay. This work is undertaken as part of the Biscayne Bay Habitat Focus Area.

August 28, 2017

Field Work

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will be traveling to Key Largo during the months of July and August to assist Dr. Margaret Miller's team (NOAA/SEFSC) and collaborators from the Florida Keys Coral Reef Foundation (CRF) in experiments aimed at characterizing the transcriptomic basis of disease resistance in Acropora corals. This project is part of OCED 'Omics initiative and will consist of quantifying various traits in the field through disease exposure/resistance assays and obtain a baseline characterization of genes that are responsible for disease susceptibility in these coral species. Overall, this information is expected to help predict which phenotypes are more "resistant" to disease and whether these "resistant" phenotypes also display a higher reproductive capacity during the spawning period.

● Lindsey Visser, Ian Smith, and Charline Quenee will conduct a survey of juvenile sportfish in Florida Bay on September 2-5, 2017. This is the fourth survey of the year. Thus far, the surveys are showing that seagrass and juvenile spotted seatrout are beginning to re-colonize in the epicenter of the 2015 mass seagrass die-off.

Meetings

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof is attending a meeting at the request of the International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOOCP) on Greenhouse Gases, and Related Measurement Techniques, GGMT-2017 in Dubendorf, Switzerland. It is the 19th meeting in a series which was initiated by Dr. C. D. Keeling at La Jolla, California in 1975. Today, GGMT is the cornerstone meeting for the observation of key greenhouse gases and tracers, their isotopes, assessment of new techniques, standardization, quality assurance, and data products. For the first time the series will include greenhouse gas measurements in the surface ocean and Wanninkhof will be the lead presenter and discussion leader on this topic.

● Chris Kelble and Roland Samimy (UMASS-Dartmouth) will be presenting research conducted as part of the Biscayne Bay Habitat Focus Area to the City of Coral Gables Commission Meeting on August 29. Chris will present results showing increasing eutrophication along the shoreline throughout Biscayne Bay and specific results on water quality and its connections to land-use within the Coral Gables waterway.

● Dr. Christopher Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley of the NOAA AOML Microbiology Program will be on travel to Saipan from Sept 1 to Sept 17 to conduct a technology transfer training workshop in molecular Microbial Source Tracking (MST) for the Bureau of Environmental Coastal Quality (BECQ) of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI - a US territory). This training workshop is the first of a series of anticipated MST workshops in Saipan funded by the NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program. Coral reef managers in CNMI have expressed the need for improved methods to detect and track Land-Based Sources of Pollution impacting the coral reefs and other marine ecosystems of the region. The primary goal of this first MST training workshop to be held at the BECQ lab in Saipan from Sept 5 to Sept 15 is to inform natural resource managers, BECQ personnel, and regional collaborators about the state of the art of microbial source tracking, including its processes, applications, benefits, and limitations, to train the BECQ lab personnel in specific MST methods and techniques to track host-specific fecal bacteria in the environment, and to aid the BECQ in adapting its instrumentation and lab equipment to conduct this MST analysis for themselves. The goal for the CNMI BECQ training is that at the end of the series of training workshops, BECQ will have the expertise, equipment, and other necessary resources to run their own MST laboratory and to serve as an environmental MST analysis center for the region, to better aid in coral reef management and in mitigation of LBSP impacting these ecosystems. The workshop this year focuses on training, proficiency testing, and validating the BECQ lab for performance of these MST techniques, while the next two workshops during the wet and dry seasons of FY18 will focus on application of these MST methods to an LBSP tracking study funded by the NOAA CRCP in collaboration with both the BECQ and the American University in Guam that will combine both microbial source tracking and stable isotope source tracking to determine LBSP pathways and impacts for marine ecosystems in Saipan Lagoon and elsewhere in the CNMI. This work is expected to help CNMI environmental quality managers better understand and mitigate LBSP contamination patterns to improve coral reef health.

Recent Accomplishments

● Dr. Jim Hendee of AOML, John Halas of Environmental Moorings, Inc., and Albert Jones of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center gave presentations and met with representatives of Fisheries, the Maritime Administration, the Port Authority, National Parks, Rivers and Beaches Authority, Tobago Cays Marine Park, and the Coast Guard of St. Vincent and the Grenadines on the morning of August 22, 2017 to discuss the best location for installing a Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station. After long discussion, it was decided to conduct a site survey in the Tobago Cays in the Grenadines, more specifically just east of Mayreau Island on Thusday, August 24. Preliminary research has found that near Mayreau there is a hot spring that appears to greatly benefit the coral ecosystem in the immediate vicinity. Further plans are being discussed within OCED for follow-up research in the area during the time of the CREWS station installation, most likely in June 2018.

August 21, 2017

Field Work

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will be traveling to Key Largo during the months of July and August to assist Dr. Margaret Miller's team (NOAA/SEFSC) and collaborators from the Florida Keys Coral Reef Foundation (CRF) in experiments aimed at characterizing the transcriptomic basis of disease resistance in Acropora corals. This project is part of OCED 'Omics initiative and will consist of quantifying various traits in the field through disease exposure/resistance assays and obtain a baseline characterization of genes that are responsible for disease susceptibility in these coral species. Overall, this information is expected to help predict which phenotypes are more "resistant" to disease and whether these "resistant" phenotypes also display a higher reproductive capacity during the spawning period.

● Several AOML scientists are participating on the third Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) aboard the NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown that ends in Fort Lauderdale that ends this week. This AOML-lead survey documented ocean acidification impacts to US living marine resources and provided full coverage of the Gulf of Mexico. AOML scientists were joined by researchers from the University of Miami, University of South Florida, North Carolina State University, the University of Louisiana, and colleagues from three Mexican institutions.

● Dr. Jim Hendee will conduct a site survey in the coastal waters of St. Vincent and the Grenadines August 21-24 to determine the best location for a new Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station to monitor atmospheric and oceanographic conditions.

Meetings

● Dr. Neda Trifonova, Ben VanDine, and Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the American Fisheries Society Annual Meeting in Tampa, FL from August 20-24. Chris will be giving a talk entitled "Applying a sportfish performance measure to estuarine restoration". Neda and Ben will be presenting posters entitled "Predicting Ecological Responses to Climate Variability with a Dynamic Bayesian Network Model" and "Population dynamics and genetic structure of Cynoscion nebulosus in Florida Bay", respectively.

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be joining many other NOAA and international colleagues at the 10th International Carbon Dioxide Conference (ICDC-10). The conference series is uniquely focused on an integrated view of the global carbon cycle. The series was the brainchild of the greats in global carbon cycle research, including Drs. H.Oeschger, U. Siegenthaler and C. D. Keeling. Since its initiation in 1981 it has provided an integrated, interdisciplinary view of the global carbon cycle and its perturbation by humans. It has resulted in seminal conference journals describing the advances and evolution in understanding the global carbon cycle. As described in the program notes, CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use increased by 85% between the first conference in 1981 and the current meeting. This underscores the role of fossil carbon emissions as the dominant driver of anthropogenic climate change and ocean acidification. The current conference will include focus on recent findings of decadal variability in air-sea CO2 fluxes that are, not fully understood and not captured in models; and impacts of decadal variability and climate modes on ocean acidification. The data from sustained observations that NOAA/OAR (ESRL/GMD) provides in the atmosphere, and AOML and PMEL in the ocean are the center point and observational underpinning of many of the keynotes, presentations and posters.

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof is attending a meeting at the request of the International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOOCP) on Greenhouse Gases, and Related Measurement Techniques, GGMT-2017 in Dubendorf, Switzerland. It is the 19th meeting in a series which was initiated by Dr. C. D. Keeling at La Jolla, California in 1975. Today, GGMT is the cornerstone meeting for the observation of key greenhouse gases and tracers, their isotopes, assessment of new techniques, standardization, quality assurance, and data products. For the first time the series will include greenhouse gas measurements in the surface ocean and Wanninkhof will be the lead presenter and discussion leader on this topic.

August 14, 2017

Welcome Aboard

● Dr. Jim Hendee, Dr. Pamela Fletcher, Jack Stamates, and Lew Gramer welcomed a new graduate researcher, Andrea Gomez, this week. The team will be using very low-cost sensors built by Mana Ammornthammarong to measure sea temperature at very high spatial resolution along a line of mooring buoys on southeast Florida shelf, near Broward County. This field trial will contribute to research on the effects of sea temperature on coral reefs, and to an ongoing project to study upwelling on the shelf.

Manuscripts

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof, Dr. Molly Baringer, and Dr. Rick Lumpkin all contributed to the recently released State of the Climate in 2016 report. You can download the report at:

https://www.ametsoc.org/ams/index.cfm/publications/bulletin-of-the-american-meteorological-society-bams/state-of-the-climate/

and a newsy summary with links to highlights:

https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/reporting-state-climate-2016

Field Work

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will be traveling to Key Largo during the months of July and August to assist Dr. Margaret Miller's team (NOAA/SEFSC) and collaborators from the Florida Keys Coral Reef Foundation (CRF) in experiments aimed at characterizing the transcriptomic basis of disease resistance in Acropora corals. This project is part of OCED 'Omics initiative and will consist of quantifying various traits in the field through disease exposure/resistance assays and obtain a baseline characterization of genes that are responsible for disease susceptibility in these coral species. Overall, this information is expected to help predict which phenotypes are more "resistant" to disease and whether these "resistant" phenotypes also display a higher reproductive capacity during the spawning period.

● Several AOML scientists are participating in the third Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) aboard the NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown from July 18 to August 21. This AOML-lead survey will document ocean acidification impacts to US living marine resources. The cruise will provide full coverage of the Gulf of Mexico. AOML scientists will be joined by researchers from the University of Miami, University of South Florida, North Carolina State University, the University of Louisiana, and colleagues from three Mexican institutions.

Recent Accomplishments

● AOML student intern Hyo Won Lee, along with his mentors Dr. Christopher Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley, presented a poster on their CRCP-funded coral microbiome research at the United States Coral Reef Task Force Meeting held August 7-11 in Fort Lauderdale Florida. The poster was entitled "Next-Generation-Sequencing and Microbial Source Tracking to Investigate Associations between Reef Microbiome Community Structure, Land-Based Sources of Pollution, and Physical Habitat Characteristics." The research reported on the exposure of coral reefs offshore of Miami-Dade and Broward Counties to land-based microbial contaminants and how sources of LBSP microorganisms could influence coral reef microbiome structure.

August 7, 2017

Manuscripts

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin co-authored a paper that has been accepted for publication in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The paper presents an application of microbial source tracking (MST) research. Specifically, MST for human fecal contamination was integrated into a regional assessment of water quality for drainages discharging to the coastal waters of the southern California Bight. The paper describes translation of MST results into site rankings to aid management in setting investment priorities for remediation.

Manuscript Citation

● Y. Cao, M.R. Raith, P.D. Smith, J.F. Griffith, S.B. Weisberg, A. Schriewer, G. Amenu, A.Sheldon, C. Crompton, X. Yu, J.Gregory, J. Guzman, K.D. Goodwin, L. Othman, M. Manasjan, S. Choi, S. Rapoport, S. Steele, and T. Nguyen. In Press. Regional assessment of human fecal contamination in southern California coastal drainages. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Field Work

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will be traveling to Key Largo during the months of July and August to assist Dr. Margaret Miller's team (NOAA/SEFSC) and collaborators from the Florida Keys Coral Reef Foundation (CRF) in experiments aimed at characterizing the transcriptomic basis of disease resistance in Acropora corals. This project is part of OCED 'Omics initiative and will consist of quantifying various traits in the field through disease exposure/resistance assays and obtain a baseline characterization of genes that are responsible for disease susceptibility in these coral species. Overall, this information is expected to help predict which phenotypes are more "resistant" to disease and whether these "resistant" phenotypes also display a higher reproductive capacity during the spawning period.

● Several AOML scientists are participating in the third Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) aboard the NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown from July 18 to August 21. This AOML-lead survey will document ocean acidification impacts to US living marine resources. The cruise will provide full coverage of the Gulf of Mexico. AOML scientists will be joined by researchers from the University of Miami, University of South Florida, North Carolina State University, the University of Louisiana, and colleagues from three Mexican institutions.

July 31, 2017

Field Work

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano is traveling to Key Largo during the months of July and August to assist Dr. Margaret Miller's team (NOAA/SEFSC) and collaborators from the Florida Keys Coral Reef Foundation (CRF) in experiments aimed at characterizing the transcriptomic basis of disease resistance in Acropora corals. This project is part of OCED 'Omics initiative and will consist of quantifying various traits in the field through disease exposure/resistance assays and obtain a baseline characterization of genes that are responsible for disease susceptibility in these coral species. Overall, this information is expected to help predict which phenotypes are more "resistant" to disease and whether these "resistant" phenotypes also display a higher reproductive capacity during the spawning period.

● Several AOML scientists are participating in the third Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) aboard the NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown from July 18 to August 21. This AOML-lead survey will document ocean acidification impacts to US living marine resources. The cruise will provide full coverage of the Gulf of Mexico. AOML scientists will be joined by researchers from the University of Miami, University of South Florida, North Carolina State University, the University of Louisiana, and colleagues from three Mexican institutions.

● Dr. Christopher Kelble, Dr. Neda Trifonova, Dr. Nicole Millette, and Dylan Sinnickson will be participating in a survey of water quality and biological oceanography in south Florida’s coastal waters this week. This is the latest bi-monthly survey of south Florida’s coastal oceanography to assess and evaluate potential impacts from Everglades Restoration.

July 24, 2017

Manuscripts

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof is co-author on a manuscript in press at Environmental Science and Technology. The article, entitled "Elimination of instrument-dependent offsets and calculation of in situ saturation states", describes an improved algorithm for spectrophotometric determinations of seawater carbonate ion concentrations derived from observations of ultraviolet absorbance spectra in lead-enriched seawater from data obtained on two NOAA research cruises (2012 and 2016) . We demonstrate that these in situ values can be used to determine calcium carbonate saturation states that are in good agreement with those determined by more laborious and expensive conventional methods.

Manuscript Citation

● Sharp, JD, RH Byrne, X Liu, RA Feely, EE Cuyler, R Wanninkhof, SR Alin. In Press. Elimination of instrument-dependent offsets and calculation of in situ saturation states. Environmental Science and Technology.

Field Work

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

Field Campaigns

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley, LT(jg) Ben VanDine, and Joe Lopez (NSU) will be collecting samples for the Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON) for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary this week from July 24-26. They will be collecting water, sediments, and coral tissue samples that will be used for molecular analysis of microbial biodiversity by AOML microbiology researchers. This work, as part of AOML Coral Genomic Observing Network (CGON) is characterizing the microbial community structure and biodiversity of coral reef microbiomes in the Florida Keys as part of a larger MBON effort to document biodiversity across trophic levels in the marine sanctuary. This project uses a variety of both traditional and state-of-the-art molecular tools such as Next-Generation-Sequencing (NGS) and molecular microbial source tracking to better characterize overall coral reef community structure and health trends. This CGON component of the larger FKNMS MBON program is conducted by AOML in collaboration with partners from the University of South Florida and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the US Antarctic Program Ship (USAP) Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

● Dr. Xaymara Serranois will be traveling to Key Largo during the months of July and August to assist Dr. Margaret Miller's team (NOAA/SEFSC) and collaborators from the Florida Keys Coral Reef Foundation (CRF) in experiments aimed at characterizing the transcriptomic basis of disease resistance in Acropora corals. This project is part of OCED 'Omics initiative and will consist of quantifying various traits in the field through disease exposure/resistance assays and obtain a baseline characterization of genes that are responsible for disease susceptibility in these coral species. Overall, this information is expected to help predict which phenotypes are more “resistant” to disease and whether these "resistant" phenotypes also display a higher reproductive capacity during the spawning period.

● Several AOML scientists are participating on the third Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) aboard the NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown from July 18 to August 21. This AOML-lead survey is documenting ocean acidification impacts to US living marine resources and provides full coverage of the Gulf of Mexico. AOML scientists are joined by researchers from the University of Miami, University of South Florida, North Carolina State University, the University of Louisiana, and colleagues from three Mexican institutions.

● Dr. Christopher Kelble, Dr. Neda Trifonova, Dr. Nicole Millette, and Dylan Sinnickson will be participating in a survey of water quality and biological oceanography in south Florida’s coastal waters. This is the latest bi-monthly survey of south Florida’s coastal oceanography to assess and evaluate potential impacts from Everglades Restoration.

Meet and Greet

● There was a OCED meet and greet for bioinformatics specialist Stephanie Rosales on Thursday July 27 at 10am in the 2nd floor conference room.

Opportunities for Interns

● Dr. Chris Kelble represented AOML at the NOAA Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems Annual Meeting in Charleston, SC on July 20th and 21st. CCME graduate students and post-docs are required to complete a 12-week internship at a NOAA facility or on a cruise. These internships are paid for by CCME and cost us nothing. It will be a great opportunity to increase the diversity of AOML and provide our scientists with exposure to a different group of graduate students beyond our typical collaborators. CCME is focused on place-based conservation, coastal intelligence, and coastal resilience. The student research focuses upon a wide-range of coastal ecosystem topics including nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, machine-learning, big data, and Harmful Algal Blooms. Please let Chris know if you are interested in hosting a student or want more information

● The NOAA Office of Education strongly recommends all NOAA mentors conduct internships using the Office of Education (OED) Student Scholarship Internship Opportunities (SSIO) online system (https://oedwebapps.iso.noaa.gov/ssio/). This is no cost and is used to track and quality control NOAA internships. Moreover, all NOAA mentors should take the mentor training available in the Commerce Learning Center.

July 17, 2017

Manuscripts

● Rik Wanninkhof is co-author on a manuscript in press at Continental Shelf Research. In the article, entitled "Time series pCO2 at a coastal mooring: Internal consistency, seasonal cycles, and interannual variability", the research team analyzed data from the Gray's Reef (GR) mooring in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) for internal consistency with pCO2w from underway cruise data, moored autonomous time series, and calculated from bottle samples (DIC-TA pairing). They describe the seasonal to interannual pCO2w time series variability and air-sea flux (FCO2), as well as describe the potential sources of pCO2w variability; and determine the source/sink for atmospheric pCO2. Over the ~8.5 years of GR mooring time series, mooring-underway and mooring-bottle calculated-pCO2w strongly correlate with r-values > 0.90.

Manuscript Citation

● Reimer, J. J., W.-J. Cai, L. Xue, R. Vargas, S. Scott Noakes, X. Hu, S. R. Signorini, J. T. Mathis, R. A. Feely, A. J. Sutton, C. Sabine, S. Musielewicz, B. Chen, R. Wanninkhof. 2017. Time series pCO2 at a coastal mooring: Internal consistency, seasonal cycles, and interannual variability. Continental Shelf Research. Accepted

Field Work

● Catalina Aguilar, Kami Cohen, Dr. Ian Enochs, Dr. Paul Jones, Graham Kolodziej, and Dr. Derek Manzello. are traveling to Islamorada, Florida the week of 17-21 July. The CRCP funded project "Elucidating the recipe of coral reef resilience in the Florida Keys" has led to the discovery of unique genotypes of the ESA listed coral Orbicella faveolata in the Florida Keys that are bleaching resistant. AOML/OCED will conduct field experiments, as well as collect corals for lab experiments in the Future Reefs Lab, to quantify the heat tolerance of these genotypes and determine if they can be used for restoration efforts.

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will be traveling to Key Largo during the months of July and August to assist Dr. Margaret Miller's team (NOAA/SEFSC) and collaborators from the Florida Keys Coral Reef Foundation (CRF) in experiments aimed at characterizing the transcriptomic basis of disease resistance in Acropora corals. This project is part of OCED 'Omics initiative and will consist of quantifying various traits in the field through disease exposure/resistance assays and obtain a baseline characterization of genes that are responsible for disease susceptibility in these coral species. Overall, this information is expected to help predict which phenotypes are more "resistant" to disease and whether these "resistant" phenotypes also display a higher reproductive capacity during the spawning period.

● Several AOML scientists will be participating in the third Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3) aboard the NOAA Ship R/V Ronald H. Brown from July 18 to August 21. This AOML-lead survey will document ocean acidification impacts to US living marine resources. The cruise will provide full coverage of the Gulf of Mexico. AOML scientists will be joined by researchers from the University of Miami, University of South Florida, North Carolina State University, the University of Louisiana, and colleagues from three Mexican institutions.

● An AOML scientist will conduct a site survey in the coastal waters of St. Vincent and the Grenadines in mid-August to determine the best location for a new Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station to monitor atmospheric and oceanographic conditions.

Meetings

● Jim Hendee, John Halas of Environmental Moorings International, Inc., and Albert Jones of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, met with various officials of the Antigua and Barbuda government on Tuesday, July 11, 2017. Jim's presentation was met with approval and plans were made to follow up with site surveys later in the week, as well as plans for the installation of the CREWS station in the future. Below is a list of Antigua participants in that meeting along with photographs of the meeting participants.

July 10, 2017

Field Work

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

● Dr. Jim Hendee conducted a site survey in the coastal waters of Antigua and Barbuda from July 10-14 to determine the best location for a new Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station to monitor atmospheric and oceanographic conditions.

July 3, 2017

Manuscripts

● The following paper is in press in the journal Environmental Science and Technology: "Consideration of Natural Sources in a Bacteria TMDL – Lines of Evidence, including Beach Microbial Source Tracking" (10.1021/acs.est.6b05886) by Kelly D. Goodwin, A. Schriewer, A. Jirik, K. Curtis, and A. Crumpacker. The manuscript documents Research-to-Commercial (R2C) and Research-to-Application (R2A) transition under CRADA No. 50-23 3RR3HWSP13. The work applies to a prevailing issue nationally for both marine and fresh waters – failure to meet water quality standards due to non-point sources of bacteria. The study utilized multiple lines of evidence to evaluate bacterial sources in the context of Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) stipulations. It appears to be the first peer-reviewed manuscript pertaining to environmental studies at a site with an adopted TMDL under consideration for a Natural Sources Exclusion (NSE) provision. Why the site has been unable to comply with TMDL stipulations despite an investment of over $23 million dollars is discussed, including comparison of regional stipulations that are more stringent than federal guidelines. The paper describes results from culture-based monitoring and qPCR measurements of fecal indicator bacteria, Microbial Source Tracking (MST), pathogen analysis, sanitary infrastructure testing, and evaluation of the efficacy of management action to control bird populations. Overall, data indicate that exceedances of bacterial water quality could be traced to birds, consistent with the NSE provision; however, available science fell short of providing the load allocations desired for reconsideration of the TMDL. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is suggested as a possible path forward, and site measurements are provided in context with existing QMRA analyses.

Field Work

● Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

Advanced Manufacturing Lab for OCED

● The room formerly known as "Shoe's Shop" is being transformed into OCED's new Advanced Manufacturing Lab. This will be a collaborative space where people will have access to state of the art equipment for digital design and fabrication. Available equipment will include PLA and SLA 3D printers, a laser cutter, as well as a CNC machine. Ian Enochs successfully submitted a proposal to fund the majority of the development of this facility at AOML/OCED. The goal of this space is to facilitate rapid prototyping and construction of custom equipment, supporting OCED's scientific and monitoring missions.

A New Research Vessel for AOML

● A contract will be executed beginning on July 1, 2017 to have a new research vessel build by Dusky Marine to improve our field capabilities at AOML. We will be acquiring a Dusky 252 CSS capable of operating nearshore and offshore while accommodating up to 7 passengers that will serve as a multi-use platform for OAR to conduct water chemistry, coral reef, physical oceanographic, and diving operations to support research projects in the South Florida region.

June 26, 2017

Meetings

● Ben Friedman, acting NOAA Administrator and Under Secretary of Commerce for Ocean and Atmosphere visited the Southwest Fisheries Center on June 27. Kelly Goodwin was one of the presenters during the tour. She provided an overview of OAR-NMFS 'Omics joint activities and the AOML 'Omics program.

Instrument Development

● AOML/CIMAS scientist Natchanon Amornthammarong has developed extremely low-cost sea temperature recording devices for shallow ocean waters. Interns of the AOML Microbiology Lab (led by AOML scientist Chris Sinigalliano) will be on loan to assemble a significant number of these devices next week. As part of a citizen-science collaboration with local communities, schools, and county partners in Broward County led by AOML/Sea Grant scientist Pamela Fletcher, an array of these devices will be deployed on southeast Florida shelf in July, to observe gradients in sea temperature across and along-shore and high-frequency variability, including possible summer upwelling. These data will be analyzed by NOAA-CREST Fellow Andrea Gomez beginning this Fall, in concert with Fletcher, AOML scientist Jack Stamates, and AOML/CIMAS scientist Lew Gramer. This project is part of a larger effort by OCED Director Jim Hendee's Coral Health and Monitoring Program (CHAMP) to understand sea temperature at the scales and depths where corals and other coastal benthic organisms really experience it.

Reports

● A new report will be published June 23 on past and future temperature stress on UNESCO World Heritage sites containing reefs. This report will highlight the urgency of coral bleaching to the World Heritage committee next month. The UNESCO World Heritage Convention has united the world around a shared responsibility to protect natural and cultural places of Outstanding Universal Value. The World Heritage List includes 29 marine areas with coral reefs. Stretching around the planet, these globally significant reefs include icons such as the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (Kiribati), the Great Barrier Reef (Australia), Papahanaumokuakea National Park (USA), Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef Reserve System (Belize) and Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park (Philippines). They are recognized for their unique and global importance and for being part of the common heritage of humanity. Heron et al. 2017. Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs : A First Global Scientic Assessment. Paris, UNESCO World Heritage Centre. Ruben van Hooidonk is one of the study's co-authors. http://whc.unesco.org/en/news/1676.

Outreach

● Dr. Ian Enochs gave a lecture to high school juniors and seniors participating in the IMPACT program. Examples of ACCRETE research in the Marianas, Papua New Guinea, the Galapagos, and the Florida Keys were used to communicate principles of ocean acidification and coral reef ecology. Following the presentation in the RSMAS conference room, students toured the Future Reef Lab and learned about AOML's new 'Omics program. Ian also met with teachers from MAST, Gulliver and Thomas Edison's iTech schools, as well as Miami's Moonlighter Program, but he is still working out the details of potential involvement and lesson plan development.

Field Work

Charles Featherstone is participating in the CLIVAR GO-SHIP P06 Cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nathanial Palmer from June 20 through October 4.

June 20, 2017

Welcome

● AOML welcomes NOAA Hollings Scholar Nathan Lanning, a marine biology and biochemistry major at the University of New Haven. Nathan will work with Dr. Jia-Zhong Zhang this summer and participate in a cruise aboard the R/V F.G.Walton Smith to learn nutrient measurement techniques for analysis of water and sediment samples.

Field Work

● On June 15 to June 24, Graham Kolodziej and Lauren Valentino will be in Puerto Rico to conduct field work for the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP). Graham and Lauren will be swapping out temperature probes and deploying bioerosion monitoring units and calcification accretion units at sites around the entire island. They will conduct carbonate budget and photographic landscape mosaic surveys in La Parguera.

● On June 19 to June 21, Dr. Maribeth Gidley, Dr. Paul Jones, and LTJG Den VanDine will collect water, sediment and coral tissue samples for the Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON) of the Florida Keys NAtional Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). AOML microbiology researches will analyze these samples to determine microbial biodiversity using both traditional and state-of-the-art molecular tools to better characterize overall coral reef community structure and health trends. The work, performed in support of the AOML's Coral Genomic Observing Network (CGON), seeks to characterize the microbial community structure and biodiversity of coral reef microbiomes in the Florida Keys. It's also part of a larger MBON effort to document biodiversity across trophic levels in the FKNMS.

● On June 19 to June 23, Linsey Visser will lead a South Florida Ecosystem Restoration cruise aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith. Other cruise participants include Ian Smith (OCED/CIMAS), Dylan Sinnickson (RSMAS MPS student), NOAA-AOML Hollings Scholar Nathan Lanning, and researchers from the University of South Florida.

Meetings

● On June 19 to June 23, Dr. Chris Kelble, Dr. Neda Trifonova and Charline Quenee will attend NOAA's Integrated Ecosystem Assessment meeting in Boulder, Colorado.

June 5, 2017

Recent Accomplishments

● Dr. Luke Thompson attended the 19th Workshop of the Genomics Standards Consortium (GSC) in Brisbane, Australia from May 15-17. GSC is an international organization that develops and implements standard methods for the collection and sequencing of environmental genomes. Dr. Thompson presented a new ontology for categorizing microbial habitats, developed as part of the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP). This new framework was enthusiastically received and is slated to be adopted in the next iteration of the Environment Ontology (EnvO).

● Drs. Maribeth Gidley and Chris Sinigalliano gave a special presentation on Friday, June 2nd to the City of Miami's Sea Level Rise Committee regarding nutrient and microbial contaminants in coastal tidal floodwaters of South East Florida. They gave a similar presentation last week to the Miami-Dade County Regulatory and Economic Resources Dept. This information from research by NOAA AOML and its academic partners is being utilized by local cities such as Miami and Miami Beach, and by the county in their planning for improving local resilience and adaptation to sea level rise and tidal flooding of the urbanized coast in Southeastern Florida.

Meetings/Workshops

● On June 5th-9th, Ben VanDine will attend a Bioinformatics "bootcamp" workshop at Auburn University, AL. This workshop emphasizes hands-on training in numerous aspects of next generation DNA sequencing data analyses such as sequence assessment and quality control, genomic and transcriptomic assembly, annotation, differential expression, phylogenomics and more. Additionally the workshop provides instruction in the Linux operating system command-line environment, basic scripting and many widely used open-source software packages. This information will be extremely valuable in setting up and operating the OCED bioinformatics server and analyzing a variety of genomic data collected from OCED projects.

● Xaymara Serrano will travel to Mote Marine Laboratory in Summerland Key on June 9-18 to participate in a workshop entitled "Methods in Ecological Genomics". This workshop is hosted by researchers from the University of Austin, Texas, and will be focused on genome-wide gene expression analysis with TagSeq. The workshop will consist of wet lab techniques (such as RNA isolation), preparation of next-generation sequencing libraries and bioinformatic analysis. Overall, Xaymara plans on using these techniques in a project aimed at assessing the genomic basis of disease resistance in Acroporid corals. This project is being undertaken in conjunction with Drs. Margaret Miller (NOAA/SEFSC), Nikki Traylor-Knowles (UM/RSMAS) and Jim Hendee.

● On June 19-23, Dr. Chris Kelble, Dr. Neda Trifonova, and Charline Quenee will attend the NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment meeting in Boulder, CO.

● Dr. Luke Thompson will attend the upcoming Symposium on the Mobilization of Structured Biodiversity Data in Leipzig, Germany from June 28-30, co-hosted by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON), and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). He will convene with international partners to develop scalable solutions for data management and sharing.

May 30, 2017

Manuscripts

The following papers were accepted/published in the past week:

● Sutton, A. J., R. Wanninkhof, C. L. Sabine, R. A. Feely, M. F. Cronin and R. Weller (2017). "Variability and trends in surface seawater pCO2 and CO2 flux in the Pacific Ocean." Geophys. Res. Let. [Paper #2017GL073814R], accepted May 22, 2017.

Wanninkhof, R. and J. A. Trinanes (2017). "The impact of changing wind speeds on gas transfer and its effect on global air-sea CO2 fluxes." Global Biogeochem Cycles. doi:10.1002/2016GB005592.

●Xu, Y.-Y., W.-J. Cai, Y. Gao, R. Wanninkhof, J. Salisbury, B. Chen, J. J. Reimer, S. Gonski and N. Hussain (2017). "Short-term variability of aragonite saturation state in the central Mid-Atlantic Bight." J. Geophys. Res. Oceans 122. doi10.1002/2017JC01290.

Field Work

● Lindsey Visser completed the inaugural juvenile sportfish survey of 2017 which took place in the Florida Bay from May 27-30. These were the first observations to see if the good recruitment year of 2016 continues into 2017 or if the drier than normal dry season raised salinities to a sub-optimal level.

May 22, 2017

International Activities

● During Jim Hendee's recent trip to Sri Lanka, he was able to meet with (and gain enthusiastic support from) the Minister of Sustainability and Wildlife, the Commander of the Navy, and the founders of Blue Resources Trust, and explain the role of the Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) in helping to begin the long process of establishing environmental trends at Pigeon Island National Park, as well as how ecological forecasts produced by the CREWS system can help environmental managers. Dr. Hendee also gave a public lecture to over a hundred citizens on what NOAA does and the new CREWS partnership.

Field Work

● Lindsey Visser will be conducting the inaugural juvenile sportfish survey of 2017 on May 27-30 in Florida Bay. This will be our first observations to see if the good recruitment year of 2016 continues into 2017 or if the drier than normal dry season raised salinities to a sub-optimal level.

Issues Requiring AA/DAA Decision, Action or Direction and/or Updates on Key Research Programs and Activities

● A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) will soon require a signature for a collaboration between the Caribbean Community Climate Change Center and NOAA/AOML.

● Planning and coordination activities for the third Gulf Of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC) continue. The cruise is scheduled to take place in July-August of 2017. Clearance requests for working in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Mexico and Cuba have been submitted. We expect to hear back from Cuba shortly. The Mexican request has been forwarded to several agencies that need to review it. Coordination with the National Parks Service (NPS) will allow sampling to extend into several national parks in the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers from AOML's OCED and PhOD are expected to participate in the cruise, as well as researchers from UM, USF, NCSU, ULL and colleagues from 3 Mexican institutions.

May 15, 2017

International Activities

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be giving a keynote presentation at the Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere (SOLAS) Frontiers in Ocean-Atmosphere Exchange meeting in Cargese, France on May 15. His presentation entitled "Advances in Estimating Anthropogenic CO2 Uptake by the Ocean" will focus on the uptake capacity of the ocean and its role contributing to "negative carbon emissions" as a future CO2 mitigation strategy.

Issues Requiring AA/DAA Decision, Action or Direction and/or Updates on Key Research Programs and Activities

● Planning and coordination activities for the third Gulf Of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC) continue. The cruise is scheduled to take place in July-August of 2017. Clearance requests for working in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Mexico and Cuba have been submitted. We expect to hear back from Cuba shortly. The Mexican request has been forwarded to several agencies that need to review it. Coordination with the National Parks Service (NPS) will allow sampling to extend into several national parks in the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers from AOML's OCED and PhOD are expected to participate in the cruise, as well as researchers from UM, USF, NCSU, ULL and colleagues from 3 Mexican institutions.

May 8, 2017

International Activities

● Dr. Jim Hendee and John Halas (contractor from Environmental Moorings International, Inc. who is helping with the CREWS station installation) met with the Sri Lanka Minister of Sustainable Development and Wildlife, Gamini Jayawickrama Perera. The Minister formally endorsed our CREWS project and offered his government's support, which is a big deal. John and Jim were invited to attend the Parliamentary Session on Wednesday, a rare invite for foreigners (like sitting in on the U.S. Congress, I guess). Dr. Jim Hendee traveled to Sri Lanka on April 29, ultimately he is heading to Pigeon Island National Park to determine a suitable site for the installation of a Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station within the national park boundaries. Once the site is chosen, plans will begin to prepare, test, ship from Miami, and install the buoy at the site within the next year or two. The near real-time data will be utilized for ecological forecasts of coral bleaching and other marine environmental events, and will serve to establish long-term data sets against which to measure marine and atmospheric status and trends. The station will measure all standard meteorological data, as well as sea temperature, salinity and light, with the capability of adding other sensors in the future, if desired. These data will help Blue Resources Marine Research and Consultancy, and the Sri Lanka Department of Wildlife Conservation predict coral bleaching (and other marine environmental events) and better understand yearly meteorological and oceanographic changes.

Field Work

● Graham Kolodziej, Dr. Derek Manzello, Lauren Valentino, and Ben Van Dine are traveling to Islamorada, Florida from 9-12 May 2017. They will be swapping pH and light instruments, as well as collecting coral samples as part of the "Elucidating the Recipe of coral reef resilience in the Florida Keys" project. This work is measuring the resilience response of corals across environmental gradients to the 2014 and 2015 mass coral bleaching events.

● NOAA and partners are participating in field tests of a prototype long-range AUV equipped with genomic sampling capability developed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). Personnel from NOAA (AOML's Dr. Kelly Goodwin and SWFSC), J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), Stanford University, and MBARI are collecting samples by traditional methods for comparison to the eAUVs ability to intelligently sample water column features, such as the chlorophyll maximum. The California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) cruise sampling was completed on April 21. The Pelagic Juvenile Rockfish Recruitment and Ecosystem Assessment Survey (Rockfish) cruise sampling will finish May 6, 2017.

Meetings/Workshops

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be presenting a talk on Advancement of the Biogeochemical (BGC) Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) at the NOAA/CPO Ocean Observation and Monitoring Division PI meeting on May 9 in Silver Spring, MD. EOVs are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) framework of sustained ocean observations (FOO). The Framework is designed to approach ocean observations the concept of EOVs, ensuring assessments that cut across platforms and recommend the best, most cost effective plan to provide an optimal global view for each EOV.

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be leading a discussion session on Carbon Chemistry Best Practices at the Southern Ocean Carbon Cycle Observations and Modelling (SOCCOM) meeting on May 10 in Princeton, NJ. The focus of the session is on the uncertainties in determining the air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean using data from the Biochemical (BGC) ARGO floats.

May 1, 2017

International Activities

● Dr. Jim Hendee traveled to Pigeon Island National Park in Sri Lanka on April 29 to determine a suitable site for the installation of a Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station within the national park boundaries. Once the site is chosen, plans will begin to prepare, test, ship from Miami, and install the buoy at the site within the next year or two. The near real-time data will be utilized for ecological forecasts of coral bleaching and other marine environmental events, and will serve to establish long-term data sets against which to measure marine and atmospheric status and trends. The station will measure all standard meteorological data, as well as sea temperature, salinity and light, with the capability of adding other sensors in the future, if desired. These data will help Blue Resources Marine Research and Consultancy, and the Sri Lanka Department of Wildlife Conservation predict coral bleaching (and other marine environmental events) and better understand yearly meteorological and oceanographic changes.

Field Work

● Graham Kolodziej, Dr. Derek Manzello, Lauren Valentino, and Ben Van Dine will be traveling to Islamorada, Florida from 9-12 May 2017. They will be swapping pH and light instruments, as well as collecting coral samples as part of the "Elucidating the Recipe of coral reef resilience in the Florida Keys" project. This work is measuring the resilience response of corals across environmental gradients to the 2014 and 2015 mass coral bleaching events.

Meetings

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will travel to St. Petersburg on May 1-3rd to present the findings from the final year of funding from the NOAA grant entitled "Understanding Coral Ecosystem Connectivity in the Gulf of Mexico-Pulley Ridge to the Florida Keys". This work is a collaborative project with multiple investigators from the University of Miami and other institutions in Florida. The main goal of this project was to understand connectivity patterns between Pulley Ridge (the deepest coral ecosystem in the continental USA) and the Florida Keys reef tract. The aim of the meeting is to provide a synthesis of all the scientific findings during the 5-year grant period.

April 24, 2017

International Activities

● Dr. Jim Hendee will be traveling to Pigeon Island National Park in Sri Lanka on April 29 to determine a suitable site for the installation of a Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) station within the national park boundaries. Once the site is chosen, plans will begin to prepare, test, ship from Miami, and install the buoy at the site within the next year or two. The near real-time data will be utilized for ecological forecasts of coral bleaching and other marine environmental events, and will serve to establish long-term data sets against which to measure marine and atmospheric status and trends. The station will measure all standard meteorological data, as well as sea temperature, salinity and light, with the capability of adding other sensors in the future, if desired. These data will help Blue Resources Marine Research and Consultancy, and the Sri Lanka Department of Wildlife Conservation predict coral bleaching (and other marine environmental events) and better understand yearly meteorological and oceanographic changes.

Field Work

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley, LT Marc Weekley, and LT(jg) Ben VanDine will be collecting samples for the Marine Biodiversity Observing Network (MBON) project in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) this week from April 25-27. They will be collecting water, sediments, and coral tissue samples that will be used for molecular analysis of microbial biodiversity by AOML microbiology researchers. This work is characterizing the microbial community structure and biodiversity of coral reef microbiomes in the Florida Keys as part of a larger MBON effort to document biodiversity across trophic levels in the marine sanctuary. This project uses a variety of traditional and state-of-the-art molecular tools such as Next-Generation-Sequencing (NGS) and molecular microbial source tracking to better characterize overall coral reef community structure and health trends. The FKNMS MBON project is conducted by AOML in collaboration with partners from the University of South Florida and the FKNMS.

Meetings

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be attending a meeting of Working group (WG) 41 of the Group of Experts on Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) on Marine geoengineering. GESAMP is an advisory body, established in 1969, that advises the United Nations (UN) system on the scientific aspects of marine environmental protection. It is jointly sponsored by eight UN organizations. WG41 will provide input to the London Protocol Parties to assist them in identifying, and justifying, marine geoengineering techniques to be listed in the new Annex 4 of the Protocol.

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano will travel to Key West on April 27-28th to present the findings from the first year of funding of the Protect Our Reefs grant entitled “Effects of sedimentation stress in adult and early life stages of corals, including two ESA-listed species”. This grant is funded by the sale of coral reef specialty license plates and administered by Mote Marine Laboratory. Overall, this work is a collaborative project with Drs. Jim Hendee, Margaret Miller (SEFSC) and Andrew Baker (UM/RSMAS) and is expected to provide empirical data to managers that might support the implementation of environmental policies aimed at increasing reef resilience by improving water quality.

April 17, 2017

Fieldwork

● In April and May 2017, AOML and partners will participate in two field tests of a long-range AUV equipped with genomic sampling capability. This instrument, MBARI's 3G ESP/LRAUV ("eAUV" for short), will rendezvous with stations on two NOAA-led cruises. Personnel from this project will be aboard the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) cruise April 14-April 21, 2017 and aboard the Pelagic Juvenile Rockfish Recruitment and Ecosystem Assessment Survey (Rockfish) April 26-May 6, 2107. Crew from NOAA, JCVI, and Stanford ill collect samples from CTD casts and process samples ship board for comparison to the eAUVs ability to intelligently sample water column features, including the chlorophyll maximum.

Meetings

● Drs. Pamela Fletcher and Christopher Kelble will be participating in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration conference in Coral Springs, Florida from April 17-20. Pamela, in collaboration with her University of Florida colleagues, is convening a pre-conference workshop Enhancing Engagement: Skills and Strategies to Involve Stakeholders in Everglades Restoration Efforts on Monday, April 17th. Pamela organized the session Delivering Climate Change Research to Support Decision Making and will present Techniques for Including Extension in Research and Reporting on Thursday, April 20. Chris is presenting Seeing the forest through the dead seagrass: upper trophic level responses to the Florida Bay seagrass die-off. Chris’ talk will focus on why we did not see a reduction in sportfish following the seagrass dieoff, but rather an increase.

● Jack Stamates will participate in the Southeast Florida coral reef Initiate/Technical advisory committee (SEFCRI-TAC) meeting at NOVA southeastern University/Halmos Collage of Natural Science and Oceanography, on April 19th and 20th. Jack will present results from a study of the coastal circulation near the St. Lucie inlet. Initial findings have shown that the near shore sites are dominated by tidal forces with a net northern transport. Measurements further offshore are significantly less tidal and indicate that oceanic influences become more dominant in this area. The Evan's Quarry reef site (the most offshore site, chosen because of fisheries interests) has episodic, strong, southern flow. Temperature data from the instruments gives insight into the frequency and severity of upwelling events that are known to occur in this area.

April 10, 2017

Manuscripts

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin had a manuscript accepted for publication in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Manuscript Abstract

● Many ocean policies mandate integrated, ecosystem-based approaches to marine monitoring, driving a global need for efficient, low-cost bioindicators of marine ecological quality. Traditional methods to assess biological quality have a variety of drawbacks that are addressed by molecular-based assessments of biodiversity and ecosystem function. This paper reviews how DNA sequencing of bioindicators, both traditional (e.g., benthic macroinvertebrates, ichthyoplankton) and emerging (e.g., microbial assemblages, fish via eDNA), promises to improve assessment of marine biological quality by increasing the breadth, depth, and throughput of information and by reducing costs and reliance on specialized taxonomic expertise. In addition to improving routine assessment methods that rely on sorting & visual inspection, sequencing can provide a detailed inventory of the microbial portion of the food web. Inclusion of this fundamental component should add value to marine monitoring programs, allowing holistic ecological assessment from both a taxonomic and functional perspective. Simultaneously, eDNA approaches offer the ability to inventory higher organisms from seawater samples. Moreover, molecular approaches are amenable to integration into automated in-situ or remotely operated platforms, further opening the possibility to increase temporal or spatial sample coverage while realizing economies compared to ship or satellite sensing. Environmental managers seek to take advantage of DNA sequencing for environmental assessment and management given potential savings in labor costs, faster sample throughput, and the relative ease of integration across trophic levels.

Manuscript Citation

Kelly D Goodwin, Luke R Thompson, Bernardo Duarte, Tim Kahlke, Andrew R. Thompson, João Carlos Marques, Isabel Caçador. DNA sequencing as tool to monitor marine ecological status. Frontiers in Marine Science. Accepted.

April 3, 2017

Meetings

● Dr. Pamela Fletcher, AOML's Sea Grant Laboratory Liaison will be in Haiti this week to implement a needs assessment for the Caribbean Council for Higher Education in Agriculture to identify regional partners from the Caribbean interested in NOAA/AOML's Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS). The needs assessment is part of AOML's involvement in the Caribbean Climate Adaptation Program and this effort seeks to identify partners who will participate in research, education, and extension of the CREWS data and information.

● Dr. Chris Kelble and his team’s Fish Population model was presented to the Secretary to highlight research on Florida Bay and Everglades restoration. As a result of the model’s success, the US Army Corps of Engineers, South Florida Water Management District, and their partners have now approved a performance measure for operational use. The performance measure developed by AOML scientists will apply the same model to assess how far Everglades Restoration has gone in restoring estuarine sportfish habitat and evaluate how potential Everglades Restoration projects are likely to affect estuarine sportfish habitat.

● Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk met with staffers from Marco Rubio's office together with the non profits Catalyst Miami and Environment Florida to discuss the importance of climate change to Florida residents and our economy. We discussed the value of FEMA, EPA, NOAA, Sea Grant and other agencies and programs that would see budget cuts under the president's proposed plan. We were met with open ears and the staffers indicated that Rubio is interested in learning more about climate change and sea level rise. .

Fieldwork

● On Wednesday March 29, OCED's Mike Jankulak, Graham Kolodziej, and Lauren Valentino travelled with Ben Van Dine to Cheeca Rocks offshore of Islamorada. They, 1) worked on troubleshooting a conductivity sensor on the newly refurbished/redeployed MAPCO2 buoy, 2) collected calcification accretion units (CAUS) and bierosion monitoring units (BMUS) as part of NCRMP monitoring, 3) recovered an ADCP and swapped out an EcoPAR sensor, and 4) did a rapid qualitative survey to document any coral disease.

● On Thursday March 30, OCEDs Catalina Aguilar, Ian Enochs, and Paul Jones with RSMAS’s Dalton Helsey collected 250 fragments from four different genotypes of the staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis from nursery sites off of Elliot Key. These corals are currently being acclimated in the Future Reef Lab and will be used in an experiment investigating the genomic and physiological response to ocean acidification stress.

March 27, 2017

Reports

● The 2017 Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Status Report is now available and being rolled out this week at the State of the Gulf of Mexico Summit. The Ecosystem Status Report was written by the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Team and includes authors from SEFSC, AOML, and NCCOS. AOML co-authors are Dr. Chris Kelble, Charline Quenée, Cristina Carollo, Leticia Barbero, and Neda Trifonova. This is the first update to original ecosystem status report that was released in 2013. The update was revised based on feedback from managers and stakeholder. It reports on the status fewer overall indicators, but includes more indicators for human dimensions and socioeconomics.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be at the State of the Gulf of Mexico Summit followed by the International Research Collaboration workshop both in Houston from March 26-30. Chris will be there to help with the roll-out with the 2017 Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Status Report by the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Team. He is also an invited participant in the International Research Collaboration workshop that aims to increase cooperative research between the US and Mexico in the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

● Rik Wanninkhof is in London this week to attend the 9th Joint WMO/IOC Commission on Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM) ship's observation team (SOT-9) meeting as co-chair and representing the International Ocean Carbon Coordination (IOCCP) and Ships of Opportunity (SOOP) CO2 projects.

● Ian Enochs answered questions at a public screening of "Maug's Caldera: A Natural Laboratory" held at the Deering Estate.

Fieldwork

● Lindsey Visser and Ian Smith will be leading the regular research survey for the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Research Project aboard the R/V Walton Smith this week from March 27-31. The cruise is conducted to sample water quality, carbon dynamics, plankton dynamics, and biodiversity of south coastal waters.

March 20, 2017

Manuscripts

● The paper entitled "Genotype and Local Environment Dynamically Influence Growth, Disturbance Response and Survivorship in the Threatened Coral, Acropora cervicornis" was accepted for publication in the journal PLoS One. This study used a reciprocal outplanting experiment with 930 corals representing ten genotypes on each of eight reefs to investigate the influence of genotype and the environment on growth and survivorship in the threatened Caribbean staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Site and genotype were the main drivers of growth and survivorship, providing important information on the best genotype and environment combinations that may lead to restoration success.

Manuscript Citation

● SDrury C, Manzello DP, Lirman D (2017). Genotype and Local Environment Dynamically Influence Growth, Disturbance Response and Survivorship in the Threatened Coral, Acropora cervicornis. PLoS One. In Press.

● Dr. Xaymara Serrano is a co-author in a manuscript accepted for publication in the journal Coral Reefs. This paper investigated phylogenetic relationships and patterns of population genetic structure and diversity in three endemic fire coral species occurring in the Brazilian Province (Millepora braziliensis, Millepora nitida, and Millepora laboreli) and one amphi-Atlantic species (Millepora alcicornis), to understand patterns of speciation and biogeography in the genus. The findings reflect the importance of the Amazon–Orinoco Plume and the Mid-Atlantic Barrier as biogeographic barriers, and suggest that, while M. alcicornis is capable of long-distance dispersal, the three endemics have restricted ranges and more limited dispersal capabilities.

Manuscript Citation

● Júlia N. de Souza, Flavia L. D. Nunes, Carla Zilberberg, Juan A. Sanchez, Alvaro E. Migotto, Bert W. Hoeksema, Xaymara M. Serrano, Andrew C. Baker and Alberto Lindner. Endemism and connectivity of fire corals (Millepora spp.) in the tropical Southwestern Atlantic. Coral Reefs. In press.

Reports

● Dr. Jim Hendee and a team of researchers from NOAA, BOEM, EPA, USDA, and NSF have finished the first draft of their chapter, "Marine Resources," as part of the Ocean Research for the Coming Decade, developed for the Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, National Ocean Council.

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Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble will be attending the State of the Gulf of Mexico One Gulf Summit and the Gulf of Mexico International Research Workshop next week in Houston, Texas. The Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ecosystem Assessment will be rolling out the first update to their Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Status Report at the Summit. The Ecosystem Status Report was revised based on user feedback to focus on fewer indicators and integrate ecology and human dimensions indicators.

March 13, 2017

Manuscripts

● OCED co-authors Maribeth Gidley, Ian Enochs, Paul Jones, Kelly Goodwin, and Chris Sinigalliano had a manuscript accepted for publication in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. This paper highlights a Next-Generation-Sequencing study of microbial populations from SE Florida coastal waters, inlets, oceanic treated wastewater outfalls, and coral reefs along the Miami-Dade and Broward coastline. This project was funded by the Coral Reef Conservation Project and conducted in concert with the OCED Numeric Nutrient Criteria Study. This publication reports that microbial contaminants from terrestrial sources such as the coastal inlets and wastewater outfalls can and do reach the actual reef corals and may influence the community structure of reef microbiota, and thus presumably influence the health and resiliency of reef ecosystems.

Manuscript Citation

● Staley, C., Kaiser, T., Gidley, M., Enochs, I, Jones, P., Goodwin, K., Sinigalliano, C., Sadowsky M., Chun, CL. (2017). A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Characterize the Impacts of Land-based Sources of Pollution on the Microbiota of Southeast Florida Coral Reefs. Applied Environmental Microbiology. (In Press).

Outreach

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin taught a lecture at the University of California, San Diego entitled "Monitoring Harmful Microbes in the Marine Environment" for course SIO126, Marine Microbiology.

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley is an invited speaker at The Earth Ethics Institute’s annual Sustainability and Urban Resiliency Symposium that will take place at Miami Dade College this Thursday, March 16th. Her presentation is entitled - "Human Health and Disease Concerns Associated with Sea-Level Rise and a Changing Climate."

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Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble is attending the Marine Biodiversity Observing Network meeting in St. Petersburg this Wednesday through Thursday. The meeting will focus on developing a biodiversity product to support the implementation of UN Sustainable Development Goal 14: Life Below the Seas.

Seminar

● Dr. Neda Trifonova gave a seminar on "Machine-learning approaches for modelling fish population dynamics" on Monday, March 13 at 10AM in the AOML first floor conference room.

Abstract: Ecosystems consist of complex dynamic interactions among species and the environment, the understanding of which has implications for predicting the environmental response to changes in climate and biodiversity. With the recent adoption of more explorative tools, like Bayesian networks, in predictive ecology, fewer assumptions can be made about the data and complex, spatially varying interactions can be recovered from collected field data and combined with existing knowledge. In this talk, Bayesian network modelling approaches will be introduced, accounting for latent effects to reveal species dynamics within geographically different marine ecosystems. The importance of a hidden variable in fish community change studies of this nature is acknowledged because it allows causes of change which are not purely found within the constrained model structure. A functional network modelling approach was developed for the region of North Sea that takes into consideration unmeasured latent effects and spatial autocorrelation to model species interactions and associations with external factors such as climate and fisheries exploitation. Finally, a modified version of this dynamic Bayesian network model was used to predict the response of different ecosystem components to change in anthropogenic and environmental factors. Through the development of fisheries catch, temperature and productivity scenarios, we explore the future of different fish and zooplankton species and examine what trends of fisheries exploitation and environmental change are potentially beneficial in terms of ecological stability and resilience.

March 6, 2017

Manuscripts

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof is a co-author on the paper "Calculating surface ocean pCO2 from biogeochemical Argo floats equipped with pH: an uncertainty analysis" that has been accepted by Global Biogeochemical Cycles. The lead author Nancy Williams, was a Holllings Scholar who did her internship at AOML. She is currently finishing her PhD degree at the University of Oregon.

Manuscript Citation

● N. L. Williams, L. W. Juranek, R. A. Feely, K. S. Johnson, J. L. Sarmiento, L. D. Talley, A. G. Dickson, A. R. Gray, R. Wanninkhof, J. L. Russell, S. C. Riser, and Y. Takeshita. In Press. "Calculating surface ocean pCO2 from biogeochemical Argo floats equipped with pH: an uncertainty analysis". Global Biogeochemical Cycles.

Field Work

● OCED’s Dr. Ian Enochs and Dr. Derek Manzello are participating on a research cruise to the Galapagos Islands from March 6 to March 14. This research is co-funded by the National Science Foundation, National Geographic, and NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program. Dr. Enochs and Dr. Manzello, along with colleagues from UCLA, Columbia University, RSMAS, and the University of the Virgin Islands, will document the health of coral reefs following the recent El Nino warming event, which led to anomalously warm waters in the region. These results will be compared to the response of these same reefs to the strong El Nino’s in 1982-83 and 1997-98, which led to significant coral mortality.

Awards

● National Marine Sanctuaries as Sentinel Sites for a Demonstration Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON) led by USF with AOML collaborating is receiving a National Oceanographic Partnership Project (NOPP) Excellence in Partnering award. The Sanctuaries MBON project seeks to provide near real-time information on the status and trends of life in the sea. The project is designed to monitor changes in marine biodiversity in two US National Marine Sanctuaries, including the Florida Keys.

Outreach

● On Thursday, March 9th, Leticia Barbero will participate in "Spaniards at UM: A Research Showcase", an event where the Consul General of Spain will be apprised of some of the research highlights of Spaniards working at the University of Miami. Leticia will talk about her ocean acidification research and the potential impacts of OA on coastal ecosystems.

February 27, 2017

Manuscripts

● Dr. Jia-Zhong Zhang is a co-author of paper entitled "Rapid and intense phosphate desorption kinetics when saltwater intrudes into carbonate rock" which has been accepted for publication in Estuaries and Coasts." This study investigates whether a pristine low-Phosphorus aquifer can desorb significant soluble reactive phosphorus in response to an influx of saltwater. This study used column leaching experiment to investigate phosphate desorption response among different layers within a single aquifer. Because coastal groundwater discharges to overlying estuaries, a better understanding of the intensity and duration of phosphate release is important. This information is valuable to coastal water managers and those engaged in restoration efforts, such as in the Everglades.

● Dr. Chris Kelble is a co-author on a manuscript that was accepted for publication in the inaugural issue of the AGU journal Geohealth. The manuscript merges the EBM-DPSER conceptual model framework Chris and colleagues developed previously with public health frameworks to form a Disaster-Pressure State-Ecosystem Services-Response-Health (DPSERH). This framework is designed to specifically address needs and gaps in disaster planning, recovery, and restoration. This includes being able to provide a more accurate representation of the costs of technological and natural disasters by incorporating not just the effects to ecosystem services, but also how changes in the delivery of ecosystem services affects human health.

Manuscript Citation

● Sandifer, PA, LC Knapp, TK Collier, AL Jones, RP Juster, CR Kelble, RK Kwok, JV Milgarese, LA Palinkas, DE Porter, GI Scott, LM smith, WC Sullivan, AE Sutton-Grier. In Press. A conceptual model to assess stress-associated health effects of multiple ecosystem services degraded by disaster events in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere. Geohealth.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble is attending the National Ecosystem Modeling Workshop (NEMoW) in St. Petersburg, FL on Feb. 28 through March 2. Dr. Kelble is presenting a talk on the use of conceptual models to conduct semi-quantitative trade-off analyses using Fuzzy-logic Cognitive Mapping.

February 21, 2017

Manuscripts

● OCED's Dr. Ian Enochs, Graham Kolodziej, and Dr. Derek Manzello are co-authors on the paper "Plasticity in skeletal characteristics of nursery-raised staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis" that was accepted for publication in Coral Reefs. This study compared the growth characteristics of the ESA listed staghorn coral, A. cervicornis, when nursery-reared either on blocks attached to substratum or hanging from PVC trees in the water column. The two rearing methods generate the same amount of calcium carbonate skeleton but produce colonies with different skeletal characteristics, and suggest that there is genetically based variability in coral calcification performance. These findings will help guide which outplant sites re most suitable for the different skeletal characteristics; e.g., corals grown on blocks have denser, more robust skeletons and thus are better suited for environments with higher wave energy. This is a collaborative effort between AOML, USGS, and Mote Marine Lab.

Manuscript Citation

● Kuffner IB, Bartels E, Stathakopoulos A, Enochs IC, Kolodziej G, Toth LT, Manzello DP, Plasticity in skeletal characteristics of nursery-raised staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Coral Reefs. In press (2017).

Transitions to Applications

● A performance measure to assess and evaluate the progress and potential of Everglades Restoration to affect estuarine fish communities has been approved by the US Army Corps of Engineers, South Florida Water Management District, and their partners. This performance measure was developed by Dr. Chris Kelble using a Habitat Suitability Index model for juvenile Spotted Seatrout as an indicator for essential fish habitat. It will be used operationally to assess how far Everglades Restoration has gone in restoring estuarine fish habitat and to evaluate how potential Everglades Restoration projects are likely to affect estuarine fish habitat.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble virtually attended a meeting on integrating risk assessments into UN Sustainable Development Goals, specifically for Goal 14: Life below the sea. Chris presented on how NOAA’s IEA program is using risk assessments to inform ecosystem approaches to marine management.

February 13, 2017

Welcome Aboard

● Dr. Catalina Aguilar Hurtado began working in OCED as a CIMAS postdoctoral associate on Feb 2. Dr. Hurtado received her Ph.D. from James Cook University in Australia and will be working with OCED's Ian Enochs and Derek Manzello on the coral omics project. Specifically, she will utilize the Future Reef Lab developed by Ian Enochs to conduct laboratory experiments to understand the genomic basis of resilience to climate change and ocean acidification in endangered coral species. Dr. Hurtado will be sitting in Michael Shoemaker’s old office on the second floor.

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Sinigalliano and Dr. Maribeth Gidley presented overviews of AOML research in Environmental Microbiology and Oceans and Human Health research at the "Marine Habitat Restoration, Monitoring, and Coastal Resiliency Symposium" hosted by the Florida Seagrant Program from Feb 7-9 at the University of Florida campus in Davie. Dr. Sinigalliano presented "An Overview of NOAA-AOML Water Quality and Environmental Microbiology Research", and Dr. Gidley presented "Potential Impacts of Sea Level Rise and Climate Change on the Interactions of Oceans and Human Health".

● Dr. Maribeth Gidley gave a presentation on Saturday, Feb 11 as an invited speaker at the University of Miami's "Empowering Capable Climate Communicators Symposium". As part of the University of Miami’s Cooper Fellow Training Series, this symposium’s purpose is to educate non-scientist members in the community on the science of Climate Change and Sea Level Rise so they are better prepared to communicate these facts to their communites, thus helping improve community resilience. Dr. Gidley’s presentation was entitled "Health and Disease Concerns Associated with Sea-Level Rise and a Changing Climate".

February 6, 2017

Meetings

● Dr. Chris Kelble attended the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystems Conference this week in New Orleans.

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof attended meetings of the scientific steering committee of the International Ocean Coordination Project (IOCCP), and a meeting on Implementation of Multi-Disciplinary Sustained Ocean Observations (IMSOO) at the Kovens Center of FIU (Feb 6-Feb11)

● Dr. Pamela Fletcher participated in a Sea Grant meeting with members of fisheries interests from the Caribbean. The meeting was led by Dr. Charles Sidman, Associate Director of the Florida Sea Grant College Program and Dr. George Baker, Seafood Specialist with Florida Sea Grant and UF and was held on Jan 27 in Miami. The purpose of the meeting was to continue a dialogue about seafood safety and to share expert knowledge from the Sea Grant College Program with interested organizations.

● Dr. Pamela Fletcher hosted a marine habitat restoration and monitoring and coastal resiliency symposium from Feb 7-9 at the University of Florida campus in Davie. The goal of this symposium is to introduce interested parties to South Florida’s diverse ecosystems and some of the unique challenges associated with the region. Drs Maribeth Gidley and Christopher Sinigalliano from CIMAS and AOML will be presenting at the event along with organizations and agencies involved in ecosystem-based management.

● Dr. Pamela Fletcher is coordinating a meeting among the five National Sea Grant laboratory liaisons on February 17th. This is the first time that the NOAA research lab liaisons will meet to share information about themselves and their Sea Grant programming.

● Dr. Pamela Fletcher will lead a discussion among newly hired University of Florida faculty and existing faculty on February 17th at the University of Florida's Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead. The purpose of the session is to advance our understanding of vulnerabilities related to sea level rise impacts in South Florida and to identify areas for collaboration among researchers in the region. This will be conducted through formal presentations and facilitated discussion.

Field Work

● Chuck Featherstone, Charles Fischer, and Jay Hooper successfully completed GO-SHIP line P18 in Punta Arenas, Chili. The cruise started in San Diego in November and measurements were taken from surface to the deep ocean at nominally 50 km resolution providing a snapshot of changes in physical and biogeochemical properties in this remote section of the South East Pacific compared to the previous occupation in 2008. Congratulations to all for accomplishing such work during such a long and at times troublesome cruise.

Training

● Marc Weekley, Ben Vandine, Derek Manzello, and Jim Hendee (together with SEFSC divers) completed NOAA Diver Training this week.

Proposals

● OCED's scientists submitted proposals in response to the RFP Ocean Technology Development:

➤ Dr. Ian Enoch's proposal to design a low-cost, small autonomous water sampler.

➤ Dr. Jim Hendee's proposal to build and deploy 5000 low-cost Temperature Sensors on coral reefs worldwide.

➤ Dr. Kelly Goodwin's proposal for 'Omics (title undecided at present, with an officially sanctioned delay in submission).

Manscripts

● The following paper has been submitted to Coral Reefs:

Serrano, X; M Miller, J Hendee, B Jensen, C Gapayao, C Pasparakis, M Grosell and A Baker. (submitted). Effects of thermal stress and nitrate enrichment on the larval oxygen consumption, settlement and mortality of two Caribbean reef corals. Coral Reefs.

Visitors

● Dr. Kathy Tedesco of Climate Observations visited AOML on Monday and Tuesday for a review of the XBT program and will have a look at the Ocean Carbon equipment/lab setups.

● Dr. Richard Feely from PMEL visited AOML on Wednesday to meet with members of the Ocean Carbon group.

● Dr. David Legler from Ocean Observations and Modeling was at AOML on Monday to meet with various researchers.

Awards

● Dr. Rik Wanninkhof was selected as Outstanding Reviewer for 2016, "in recognition of the high quality and timeliness of your reviews for Environmental Research Letters.".

January 30, 2017

Meetings

● Rik Wanninkhof is a co-author on two abstracts accepted for presentation at EGU:

➤ Anthropogenic impacts on carbon uptake variability in the subtropical North Atlantic: 1992-2010 by Tobia Tudino et al. resulting from a collaboration with a student Tobia Tudino from Southampton Oceanography Center.

➤ Wind-driven ocean dynamic effects on the contrasting sea-ice trends around West Antarctica by Sang-Ki Lee et al. where San-Ki Lee (AOML) has applied a model to investigate trends of sea ice. The model will be used for investigations of Ocean Acidification.

● Chris Kelble will be presenting an investigation of how Gulf-wide indicators in the Ecosystem Status Report responded to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and Hurricane Katrina at the Oil Spill and Ecosystems Conference in New Orleans next week.

Field Work

● Charlie Fischer and Chuck Featherstone sampled their last station on January 29th and completed running nutrient and DIC analyses as part of the P-18 cruise. They are due into Punta Arenas on February 3.

January 23, 2017

Meetings

● Chris Kelble is attending the RECOVER science meeting at the South Florida Water Management District Headquarters in West Palm Beach on Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 23 and 24. This meeting aims to review the science done to date to support Everglades Restoration and chart the course for future Everglades Restoration scientific endeavors.

● Dr. Kelly Goodwin participated in a cross-agency meeting on genomics collaborations with a focus on eDNA. The meeting was held at the NOAA National Systematics Lab/Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington DC on 1/19/2017. The attendee list included representatives from NOAA, the Smithsonian, BOEM, Navy, USGS, and NSF.

● Dr. Denis Pierrot and Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be lead PIs in the review of the surface water CO2 network requested by the Ocean Observation and Monitoring Division (OOMD) of the CPO on Friday January 27.

Field Work

● Lindsey Visser, Charline Quenee, and Nicole Millette will be participating in the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Research cruise aboard the R/V Walton Smith on Jan. 30-Feb. 3. This cruise monitors the effects of Everglades Restoration on the coastal ecosystem. Sampling is also conducted to investigate carbon dynamics and cycling in the Florida Keys and southwest Florida shelf and to attempt to develop an operational framework for a marine biodiversity observation network in the Florida Keys.

Webinar

● Dr. Leticia Barbero and Dr. Rik Wanninkhof will be presenting the inaugural Gulf of Mexico Coastal Acidification science webinar on January 24, 2017 titled "Ocean Acidification of the Pelagic Gulf of Mexico".

Other News

● Data from the Little Cayman CREWS station was used by the former Science Director, Kristi Foster, of the Little Cayman Research Center in the following publication:

Banks, S. and K. Foster. 2017. Baseline levels of Sidersastrea siderea bleaching under normal environmental conditions in Little Cayman. Open Journal of Marine Science 7: 142-154.

January 17, 2017

Manuscripts

● Leticia Barbero and Rik Wanninkhof co-authored a manuscript accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters. The manuscript examined how acidification in coastal water in the Gulf of Mexico was affected by river-driven primary production and respiration. Nutrient inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River system into the northern Gulf of Mexico promote high phytoplankton production and lead to high respiration rates associated with algal decomposition. Respiration coupled with water column stratification results in seasonal summer hypoxia in bottom waters on the Louisiana Shelf. In addition to consuming oxygen, respiration produces dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), thus lowering the pH and acidifying bottom waters. Here we present a high-resolution biogeochemical model simulating this eutrophication-driven acidification and investigate the dominant underlying processes. The model shows the recurring development of an extended area of acidified bottom waters in summer on the Louisiana Shelf that coincides with hypoxic waters. Acidified waters are constrained to the bottom boundary layer; in this layer the production of DIC by benthic metabolic processes is dominant. Despite a reduced saturation state, acidified waters remain supersaturated with respect to aragonite.

Manuscript Citation

● Enhanced macroboring and depressed calcification drive net dissolution at high-CO2 coral reefs. Ian C. Enochs, Derek P. Manzello, Graham Kolodziej, Sam H. C. Noonan, Lauren Valentino, Katharina E. Fabricius. Proc. R. Soc. B 2016 283 20161742; DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2016.1742. Published 16 November 2016.

Field Work

● Charlie Fischer and Chuck Featherstone continue onboard R/V Ron Brown running nutrient and DIC analyses as part of the P-18 cruise.

Seminars

● Nicole Millette, a new post-doc in OCED, will be giving the following seminar next Thursday, January 26 at 10AM in the AOML first floor seminar room.

Title: Ecosystem Impact of Winter Dinoflagellate Blooms in the Chesapeake Bay

Abstract: Winter dinoflagellate blooms are a common occurrence in temperate estuaries but there is a lack of research on the ecology of these blooms. Through a combination of laboratory and field-based experiments and modeling I describe how and why winter blooms form and what their impact is on the winter and spring ecosystems. Below average winter temperature increases the chance of a dinoflagellate bloom forming; these blooms decrease the mortality rate of copepod nauplii hatched in winter. Simultaneously, below average winter temperatures decrease the developmental rate of copepod nauplii hatched in winter, which cause peak copepodite abundance to occur later in spring. Anadromous fish larvae that hatch in spring will feed on these copepodites that were originally hatched in winter, and a later spring peak of high copepodite abundance results in higher annual fish recruitment.

January 9, 2017

Welcome Aboard

● Dr. Neda Trifonova is starting with OCED today. She is a post-doc with CIMAS working primarily on the Gulf of Mexico Integrated Ecosystem Assessment. Dr. Trifonova got her Ph.D. from Brunel University in London. Her dissertation was on "Machine Learning Approaches for Modelling Fish Population Data." She will be located in the office withCharline Quenee in the second floor back hallway. Please stop by and introduce yourself and welcome her to OCED.

Field Work

● Charlie Fischer and Chuck Featherstone continue onboard R/V Ron Brown running nutrient and DIC analyses as part of the P-18 cruise.