AOML Photo Gallery

This photo gallery highlights AOML scientists conducting field activities and related events or accomplishments. Mouse over each image for a description of the image content.

 

Frost Science IMPACT Summer Camp

This June, AOML hosted students from the Frost Science Upward Bound Math and Science program. This program provides high school students with access to mentors and technology, interaction with scientists, as well the IMPACT (Integrated Marine Program and College Training) Summer Program, in which they delve specifically into marine science. Students were given a tour of AOML, where they were educated on research topics such as microbial and molecular ecology, ecosystem water quality, coral reef ecology, fisheries ecology and population genetics. Students also met with current AOML interns, who provided perspective on NOAA internships and educational opportunities. 

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images).

 

A student examines microbial contaminants of a water sample. Image credit: NOAA Maribeth Gidley teaches students about marine microbial ecology. Image credit: NOAA IMPACT students tour the Future Reef Laboratory. Image credit: NOAA
AOML Intern Kami Cohen explains the importance of coral reefs. Image credit: NOAA Group photo of the IMPACT students and mentors. Image credit: NOAA Tom Jackson discusses fisheries ecology with the IMPACT students. Image credit: NOAA

 

2017 May Western Boundary Time Series Cruise

This May, AOML scientists and colleagues from the University of Miami took part in a 17-day research cruise aboard R/V Endeavor in support of the NOAA-funded Western Boundary Time Series project. The science team gathered a total of 44 CTD profiles, which measure full water column values of salinity, temperature, and oxygen. Data from four recovered NOAA pressure-equipped inverted echo sounder (PIES) moorings were acoustically downloaded, and three new PIES moorings were deployed. Excitingly, the scientists also successful recovered a prototype PIES-data pod system, equipped with the Adaptable Bottom Instrument Information Shuttle System (ABIISS), which was deployed in October 2015.

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images).

AOML members recover CTD package on the R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA The science team for the May 2017 MOCHA-WBTS cruise. Image credit: NOAA The ABIISS prototype successfully recovered after 18 months nearly three miles down on the bottom of the ocean. Image credit: NOAA

 

Congratulations Gladys, We Will Miss You!

AOML employees commemorated Gladys Medina's retirement after 45 years of federal service as executive assistant to the AOML director. Thank you Gladys, for all of your hard work and dedication at AOML. 

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images). 

 

Gladys Medina retires after 45 years of federal service. Image credit: NOAA  Dr. Atlas presents Gladys with a gift. Image credit: NOAA Molly Baringer wishes Gladys a happy retirement. Image credit: NOAA 

 

52nd Annual Federal Employee of the Year Award Program

Congratulations to AOML's research oceanographer Sang-Ki Lee for winning the scientific category at the 52nd Annual Federal Employee of the Year Award Program on May 12th. Sang-Ki is the author of numerous publications related to climate and weather phenomena, and leads projects including a study of the impact of regional sea surface temperature variability on ocean acidification and fisheries. His recent work on US tornado outbreak risk was the #1 NOAA Research story in 2016 based on public interest on NOAA's social media accounts. Dr. Lee's extensive publication history can be found here: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/people/lee/index.php

  

Sang-Ki Lee accepts his award. Image credit: NOAA

 

2017 Hurricane Awareness Tour

This past Friday, May 12th, AOML oceanographic and meteorological scientists participated in the final leg of NOAA's Hurricane Awareness Tour in Miami at the Opa-Locka Executive Airport. The tour provided an opportunity for NOAA’s National Weather Service and partner agencies to visit locations along the east coast that could be impacted by hurricanes, and to teach visitors about weather safety and preparedness. Visitors were also given the opportunity to climb aboard “Kermit” - one of the P-3 aircrafts used by NOAA Hurricane Hunters - to tour the "flying laboratory" and meet the scientists and pilots who fly into storms to gather data.

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images).

 AOML Scientists teaching visitors about hurricane data collection. Image credit: NOAA AOML Scientists teaching visitors about hurricane data collection. Image credit: NOAA  AOML Scientists teaching visitors about hurricane data collection. Image credit: NOAA
A record of 'Kermit's' flights. Image credit: NOAA  Rick Knabb makes his final speech as director of the NHC. Image credit: NOAA AOML Scientists in front of NOAA's P-3 aircraft, Kermit. Image credit: NOAA 


CalCOFI Cruise Aboard NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada 

The California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) cruise sampling was completed on April 21st aboard NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada. NOAA and partners participated in the first of two field tests of a prototype long-range autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with genomic sampling capability developed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). Scientists collected samples by traditional methods for comparison to the eAUVs ability to intelligently sample water column features, such as the chlorophyll maximum. Learn more about genomics and the unique CalCOFI partnership here: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/keynotes/keynotes_1114_omics_calcofi.html.

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images).

 

 Scientists aboard NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada oversee eAUV deployment. Image credit: NOAA  eAUV is deployed during April 2017 CalCOFI cruise. Image credit: NOAA

 

NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown Cruise

NOAA AOML scientists participated in the 2017 annual PIRATA Northeasten Extension (PNE) and Saharan Dust AERosols and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE) cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown from February 19 to March 25. The purpose of the PNE cruise was to measure upper ocean and near surface atmosphere in the Tropical Atlantic. This region is known for strong climate variations with impacts on rainfall rates and storm strikes for the surrounding regions of Africa and the Americas. AEROSE is an internationally recognized series of field campaigns led by scientists at Howard University and NOAA designed to explore African air mass outflows and their impacts on climate, weather and environmental health. 

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images).

 

Surface floats waiting to be deployed. Image credit: NOAA  Many scientists are needed to launch an ozonesonde. Image credit: NOAA  A PNE mooring being recovered after 15 months at sea. Image credit: NOAA
Scientists prepare the conductivity temperature depth frame. Image credit: NOAA  Scientist deploying a surface drifting buoy. Image credit: NOAA  Scientists and crew members recovering an underwater glider. Image credit: NOAA 

 

Hurricane-Hunting Technology Explores Atmospheric and Oceanic Interactions in the Caribbean

Throughout the Atlantic hurricane season, this autonomous underwater vehicle dives to depths of up to 1,000 meters and travels thousands of kilometers across the Caribbean Sea. The gliders are deployed in the Caribbean and tropical North Atlantic. Researchers use the ocean profile data from the underwater gliders to assess the impact of tropical cyclone conditions on upper ocean thermal structure, and to improve tropical cyclone intensity forecasts. By improving models and forecasts, NOAA researchers help the public prepare for dangerous weather, and keep communities both informed and safe. 

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images). 

 

Glider ready for deployment. Image credit: NOAA NOAA scientist working on the underwater glider. Image credit: NOAA The Caribbean at night. Image credit: NOAA
NOAA scientist working on the underwater glider. Image credit: NOAA NOAA scientist ready to deploy the underwater glider. Image credit: NOAA Up close shot of part of the glider. Image credit: NOAA
Houses located in the Caribbean. Image credit: NOAA NOAA crew along with an underwater glider. Image credit: NOAA Underwater gliders ready to be sent out into the ocean. Image credit: NOAA

 

NOAA AOML Hosts Take Your Child to Work Day

NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory hosted take your child to work day at the lab. The children were first shown two presentations by NOAA scientists on sea level rise and hurricanes. Afterwards, the children were taken to the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, where the children were shown around the new coral reef lab and had the unique opportunity to see the University's wave tank. 

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images). 

 

Child looks on at the wave tank located at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Image credit: NOAA Commander Justin Kibbey and his son look on at a presentation. Image credit: NOAA Child plays with a model dropsonde. Image credit: NOAA
All of the children gathered together to take a picture. Image credit: NOAA Ian Enochs explains how his coral lab works to the children. Image credit: NOAA Children look on at a demonstration on how sea level rise works. Image credit: NOAA
Children enjoy a nice lunch. Image credit: NOAA Children and parents look on at the wave tank located at the University of Miami. Image credit: NOAA Parent with their child participate in a presentation on hurricanes. Image credit: NOAA

NOAA Hurricane Hunters Fly into Hurricane Matthew

NOAA's Hurricane Hunters fly into hurricanes to help study important features and improve forecasts. The photos below highlight two different flights, on October 5 & 6, 2016, that were taken from flights into Hurricane Matthew as it moved through the Atlantic and up the East Coast of the United States. Hurricane Matthew eventually moved off the East Coast and would dissipate out in the Atlantic Ocean. 

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images)

 

Looking outside the window of the P-3 aircraft while flying through the eyewall of Hurricane Matthew. Image credit: NOAA The eye of Hurricane Matthew seen from the aircraft. Image credit: NOAA The cockpit of the P-3 aircraft. Image credit: NOAA
The side of the P-3 aircraft, showing all the hurricanes it flew through. Image credit: NOAA NOAA Hurricane Hunters going over the mission. Image credit: NOAA NOAA Hurricane Hunters talking about the hurricane. Image credit: NOAA
Cloud layers seen above Hurricane Matthew. Image credit: NOAA NOAA Hurricane Hunter releasing dropsondes to determine temperature, pressure, and humidity of the hurricane. Image credit: NOAA Sunset as seen from NOAA Hurricane Hunter flight into Hurricane Matthew. Image credit: NOAA
NOAA Hurricane Hunters and Researchers go over mission plans before taking off. Image credit: NOAA The inside of the NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft. Image credit: NOAA Engines seen from inside the aircraft. Image credit: NOAA

 

Images Referenced During Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA)

NOAA AOML will play host to a Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA) on September 22, 2016 from 1:00-3:00pm EST. Frank Marks, Sc.D., Director of the Hurricane Research Division at AOML, and P-3 hurricane hunter pilot Commander Justin Kibbey of the NOAA Corps will answer questions. 

Posted: September 21, 2016

Photo credit: NOAA (Click on photos to view larger images)

 

NOAA aircraft will fly into hurricanes and collect data to improve forecasting. Image Credit: NOAA NOAA aircraft will fly into hurricanes and collect data to improve forecasting. Image Credit: NOAA Inside of the NOAA aircraft during flight. Image credit: NOAA
NOAA aircraft in flight. Image credit: NOAA Radar image. Image credit: NOAA NOAA aircraft in flight. Image credit: NOAA
NOAA aircraft will fly into hurricanes and collect data to improve forecasting. Image Credit: NOAA Wind radar. Image credit: NOAA  

 

NOAA Hurricane Hunters Fly into Tropical Storm Hermine 

NOAA's Hurricane Hunters regularly fly into developing systems that may threaten landfall or to study important features to improve forecasts. Photos below highlight flights into Tropical Storm Hermine that moved from the Atlantic over to the Gulf of Mexico in late August and early September 2016. What began as an experiment to study the genesis of a storm, Tropical Storm Hermine eventually moved into the Gulf of Mexico with landfall expected in North Florida.

Posted: August 31, 2016 

Updated: September 1, 2016

 

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images)

 

NOAA aircraft flying into TD9 to collect data. Image credit: NOAA NOAA aircraft flying into the sunset of TD9. Image credit: NOAA  NOAA AOC tech preparing to launch a dropsonde into TD9. Image credit: NOAA 
 NOAA Hurricane Hunters brief the crew before flying into TD9. Image credit: NOAA Pilots view while flying into TD9. Image credit: NOAA  NOAA Hurricane Hunter flight pattern after flying into TD9 (red). Image credit: NOAA 
View of TD9 from the plane as the sun peaks out behind it. Image credit: NOAA  NOAA's Hurricane Hunters take a selfie before heading out on their flight. Image credit: NOAA  NOAA Hurricane Hunter crew before takeoff. Image credit: NOAA 

 

Juvenile Sportfish Monitoring in the Florida Bay 

 

With an average depth of only 3 feet, the Florida Bay is home to a number of marine populations, as well as a vital nursery ground for commercial and recreational reef fish species. The Florida Bay also plays host to a group of NOAA researchers who are investigating how habitat changes in Florida Bay are impacting juvenile sportfish populations, with a focus on the spotted seatrout. The study aims to examine the relationship between juvenile spotted seatrout abundance, salinity, temperature, and seagrass, and use the data to quantify and predict the impacts of Everglades Restoration.

 

View the entire photo essay here: Spotting the Seatrout, by: Hanna Payne 

 

Photo credit: NOAA  (click on photos to view larger images)

 

Upside-down Jellyfish in the waters of the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA The waters of the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA Research ship moves to gather data. Image credit: NOAA 
Diverse marine species roam the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA   Diverse marine species roam the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA Scientists look to gather data from the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA 
 Research ship moves to gather data. Image credit: NOAA Scientists look to gather data from the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA   Diverse marine species roam the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA
 Scientists look to gather data from the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA Diverse marine species roam the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA   Scientists gather data in the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA
 Maps to determine where scientists will gather data. Image credit: NOAA Scientists gather data in the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA  Scientists gather data in the Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA 

 

Puerto Rico Underwater Glider Mission 

On Thursday July 21st, PHOD began its fifth underwater glider mission in the Caribbean Sea. Two underwater gliders, SG609 and SG630, were successfully deployed off of Puerto Rico. The deployment was carried out by AOML researchers on board the R/V La Sultana with the help of personnel from the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez (UPRM). The refurbished gliders have sensors that measure temperature, salinity, oxygen, Chlorophyll-a, and turbidity. This deployment is the beginning of the 2016 Atlantic Hurricane Season deployment, with two more gliders scheduled for deployment in the tropical North Atlantic in August.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

 

Underwater glider mission takes off in the waters of Puerto Rico. Image credit: NOAA Underwater glider gets ready for deployment. Image credit: NOAA Lights in Puerto Rico. Image credit: NOAA
Two underwater gliders get ready for deployment. Image credit: NOAA Lizard in Puerto Rico. Image credit: NOAA Water off the coast. Image credit: NOAA
Colorful houses light up the scene in Puerto Rico. Image credit: NOAA Scientist looks on as he traverses the waters. Image credit: NOAA Scientist looks on as they get ready to deploy the underwater gliders. Image credit: NOAA
Scientists look over plans for deployment of the underwater gliders. Image credit: NOAA
Scientists and crew get ready to send the underwater glider into the ocean. Image credit: NOAA Scientists look on as the underwater glider is sent into the ocean. Image credit: NOAA

 

F.G. Walton Smith Florida Straits Cruise


From July 13th to 14th, AOML researchers conducted a hydrographic survey along 27N in the Florida Straits as part of the Western Boundary Time Series project aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith. The cruise conducts surveys to quantify Florida Current volume transport and water mass changes.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 Scientists conduct experiments in the Florida Straits. Image credit: NOAA Scientists conduct experiments in the Florida Straits. Image credit: NOAA   Summer interns gain valuable field work experience. Image credit: NOAA
 Scientists work to analyze data taken on the cruise. Image credit: NOAA  Sunset in Florida taken on the cruise. Image credit: NOAA  View of downtown Miami taken on the ship. Image credit: NOAA
 View from the Walton Smith on the water. Image credit: NOAA  Scientists and crew enjoying their time on the ship. Image credit: NOAA  Scientist getting ready to perform their experiment. Image credit: NOAA
 Night time surveys were conducted on this cruise. Image credit: NOAA Scientists sharing a laugh aboard the ship. Image credit: NOAA   Scientists get ready to conduct night time surveys in the Florida Strait. Image credit: NOAA

NOAA Nancy Foster Research Cruise 

Photos from the scientsts and data from the NOAA Nancy Foster Cruise that sailed off in May. The Nancy Foster sailed out on a research survey to search for bluefin tuna larvae among other fishy creatures. Read more about the cruise in this web feature.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)


Scientists working aboard the Nancy Foster research ship. Image Credit: NOAA Scientists working aboard the Nancy Foster research ship. Image credit: NOAA Bathymetric map of Banco de San Antonio from Nancy Foster. Image credit: NOAA
 Mixed assortment of reef fish. Image credit: NOAA Students and teachers pose in front of the Nancy Foster. Image credit: NOAA   Scientists working aboard the Nancy Foster research ship. Image credit: NOAA
 Scientists working aboard the Nancy Foster research ship. Image credit: NOAA  Scientists working aboard the Nancy Foster research ship. Image credit: NOAA  Three dimensional closeup of the southeastern portion of Banco de San Antonio. Image credit: NOAA

 

AOML Scientists Conclude Fourth Underwater Glider Mission 

On Thursday June 2nd, PHOD concluded its fourth underwater glider mission in the Caribbean Sea.  Along with their partners at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez, the glider was recovered from the R/V La Sultana. Since the beginning of AOML glider operations in July 2014, approximately 9000 temperature and salinity profiles have been collected in the Caribbean Sea and the Tropical North Atlantic. AOML's underwater glider operations are carried out in support of tropical cyclone studies. The next deployments will be carried out in June and July, with two gliders in the Caribbean Sea and two gliders in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

 

Scientists work to recover the underwater glider in the Caribbean Sea. This mission was concluded on June 2. Image Credit: NOAA  Underwater glider working on being recovered in the Caribbean Sea. Image Credit: NOAA  Scientists work to recover the underwater glider in the Caribbean Sea. This mission was concluded on June 2. Image Credit: NOAA

 

AOML Participates in CBS4 Miami's S.T.E.A.M. Day 

On Tuesday, May 24th, AOML Associate Director and hurricane hunter pilot LCDR Justin Kibbey and AOML Communications staff participated in the S.T.E.A.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics) Day event at Marlins Park, hosted by local news station CBS4. Thousands of elementary and middle school students from across Miami-Dade and Broward were on hand as part of the fun-filled, science-focused educational field trip at the ballpark. The pre-game programming was designed to teach students the basic concepts of weather and climate and how these topics relate to living in South Florida. LCDR Kibbey discussed what it is like to fly into hurricanes and introduced the Coyote Unmanned Aerial System, a small aircraft used by NOAA to conduct research inside of a hurricane.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

The Coyote UAS on the field at Marlins Park for CBS4's S.T.E.A.M. Day. Image credit: NOAA Miami Marlins mascot Billy poses with the Coyote UAS. Image credit: NOAA Students answer hurricane research-related trivia questions on the video board. Image credit: NOAA
LCDR Justin Kibbey with CBS4 media correspondent and the Coyote UAS. Image credit: NOAA The Coyote UAS on the field at Marlins Park for CBS4's S.T.E.A.M. Day. Image credit: NOAA LCDR Justin Kibbey shares his experience of flying into hurricanes with the crowd. Image credit: NOAA
  The Coyote UAS on the field at Marlins Park for CBS4's S.T.E.A.M. Day. Image credit: NOAA  

 

GO-SHIP Indian Ocean Cruise

Photos from the ongoing GO-SHIP cruise transecting the Indian Ocean. Read more about the cruise in this web feature.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

  

 

The cruise track for the 2016 GO-SHIP Indian Ocean cruise. Credit: NOAA Instruments such as the ARGO float are used by scientists aboard the GO-SHIP cruise to collect ocean measurements. Image credit: NOAA A view from the deck of the R/V Roger Revelle. Image credit: NOAA
           Instruments such as the CTD are used by scientists aboard the GO-SHIP cruise to collect ocean measurements. Image credit: NOAA     The cruise track for the 2016 GO-SHIP Indian Ocean cruise. Credit: NOAA           A researcher takes a sample from a Niskin bottle found on the CTD. Image credit: NOAA
       Sunrise aboard the R/V Roger Revelle. Image credit: NOAA  
  The CTD is deployed as the sun sets in the horizon. Image Credit: NOAA  

 

Underwater Gliders Begin Fourth Mission

The fourth underwater glider mission began in March with the deployment of two refurbished gliders in the Caribbean Sea off Puerto Rico. The deployment was carried out by AOML researchers on board the R/V La Sultana with the help of personnel from the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez (UPRM). The refurbished gliders have sensors that measure temperature, salinity, oxygen, Chlorophyll-a, and turbidity. The gliders will obtain approximately 2500 ocean profiles during this mission, which will last until June. In addition, several experiments will be carried out to assess glider-derived currents and sensor accuracy. The fifth mission is scheduled to start in August and will be geared towards obtaining critical temperature/salinity profile data that can be used in ocean-atmospheric models to help forecast tropical cyclone intensification.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

The refurbished gliders are loaded and ready to go. Image credit: NOAA The glider deployment team including AOML's Grant Rawson (second from right). Image credit: NOAA

 

Deputy NOAA Administrator Vice Admiral Manson Brown Visits AOML

VADM Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA
NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA
NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA      NOAA Deputy Administrator VADM Manson Brown took a tour of AOML and the Southeast Fisheries Science Center on March 15th to learn about current research and addressed staff during a town hall session. Image Credit: NOAA

 

Coral Scientists Replace Instrumentation for Ongoing Coral Bleaching Study

From March 1st through March 3rd, AOML coral scientists traveled to reefs in the Upper and Lower Florida Keys to swap out instruments being used for an ongoing coral bleaching study. Both pH and light loggers were collected and deployed at inshore and offshore study sites. The pH loggers, known as SeaFETs, are used to provide accurate measurements of seawater pH over long periods of time. For light measurements, ECO-PAR sensors are installed to record highly accurate measurements of PAR, or photosynthetically active radiation, the spectral range of solar radiation from 400 to 700 nanometers that photosynthetic organisms are able to use in the process of photosynthesis.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

AOML coral scientists prepare for their dive at a reef in the Upper Keys. Image credit: NOAA Healthy coral and reef fish along the dive site. Image credit: NOAA AOML coral scientist Renee Carlton prepares to swap out the ECO-PAR instrument at a dive site in the Upper Keys. Image credit: NOAA
AOML coral scientist Renee Carlton prepares to swap out the ECO-PAR instrument at a dive site in the Upper Keys. Image credit: NOAA       A newly installed ECO-PAR sensor to measure light on the reef. Image credit: NOAA A newly installed ECO-PAR sensor to measure light on the reef. Image credit: NOAA
     

 

AOML Engages Local Students in STEM Activities for National Labs Week

On Friday, March 4th, AOML hosted 35 students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School for the Obama Administration’s My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. This national event is designed to introduce students from communities that are not well represented in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) careers to federal employees and lab facilities in the hopes of inspiring interest in these fields. Students from this Title 1 Miami-Dade County public high school soared into a hurricane though the eyes of our hurricane hunter scientists, experienced the challenge of engineering ocean observing technologies, discovered the microorganisms in our coastal beaches and met the programmers who create our next generation hurricane models to predict storms. AOML researchers brought their science within reach as hands-on experiments introduced concepts of ocean circulation, water properties, and microbial sampling. AOML partnered with The University of Miami's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies to provide the bus services needed to bring the students to the federal laboratory.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

     Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA      Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA
Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA
Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA
Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA
Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA
        Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA Students from Miami's Booker T. Washington High School participate in STEM activities directed by researchers at NOAA's AOML for My Brother's Keeper National Labs Week. Image credit: NOAA  

 

AOML Participates in El Niño Rapid Response Campaign

AOML hurricane researcher Jason Dunion participated in NOAA's El Niño Rapid Response Field Campaign, a comprehensive land, sea, and air sampling effort in the tropical Pacific, to study the current El Niño and improve weather forecasts thousands of miles away. Dunion was part of the team of NOAA scientists and partners that deployed NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned aircraft, a key asset for the Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT) project led by researchers with NOAA's Unmanned Aircraft System Program. The Global Hawk carried a suite of meteorological sensors and dropped parachuted weather instruments during four research flights in February in the eastern Pacific, near the U.S. West Coast. Data from the flights will help improve the models that are used to support weather forecasts. The data will also provide insights that researchers hope will improve year-to-year El Niño forecasts, as well as the accuracy of the models predicting the longer-term effects of climate change.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

El Niño Rapid Response project members, including AOML's Jason Dunion (back, middle) at the Global Hawk Operations Center at Edwards Airforce Base. Image credit: NOAA El Niño Rapid Response project members, including AOML's Jason Dunion (second from right) in front of the Global Hawk at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base. Image credit: NOAA

 

February 2016 Western Boundary Time Series Cruise

AOML researchers completed a Western Boundary Times Series cruise in February aboard the UNOLS Ship R/V Endeavor. The AOML team was supported by additional crew from the University of Puerto Rico. During their 2 weeks at sea, the science team gathered full water column values of salinity, temperature, and oxygen with a CTD (conductivity-temperture-depth) instrument, as well as deployed three pressure inverted echo sounder (PIES) moorings. The PIES moorings will measure the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation at 26°N in support of the RAPID (Rapid Research and Response) program, a joint effort of NOAA and the National Science Foundation.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Image of the Puerto Rican coast shot from the R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA AOML oceanographer works on the CTD between deployments. Image credit: NOAA Image taken off the stern of the UNOLS R/V Endeavor as the vessel is underway. Image credit: NOAA
AOML and University of Puerto Rico scientists reviewing the latest ocean observations from the WBTS cruise. Image credit: NOAA A pressure inverted echo sounder is taken apart and inspected aboard the R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA AOML and University of Puerto Rico scientists reviewing the latest ocean observations from the WBTS cruise. Image credit: NOAA
  Crewmembers deploy a pressure inverted echo sounder instrument to measure average sound speed in the water column. Image credit: NOAA  

 

AOML Hosts Young Scientists on Take Your Child To Work Day

 

On February 5, 2016, AOML was a proud participant in the annual 'Take Your Child to Work Day' tradition. This year's theme focused on the global ocean observing system, a network of ocean buoys and drifters to which AOML contributes to, that collects vital data on the world's oceans. After an overview of the program by AOML oceanographer Dr. Rick Lumpkin, students had the opportunity to inspect and learn about AOML's array of ocean-going instruments. With these drifter designs in mind, students then got to build and test their own! Thanks to all the AOML staff and young scientists who joined us this year!

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

Students inspect AOML's array of ocean instruments. Image credit: NOAA AOML oceanographer Rick Lumpkin gives a lesson on the global ocean observing network. Image credit: NOAA Students work together to construct their own ocean drifters. Image credit: NOAA
Students work together to construct their own ocean drifters. Image credit: NOAA Students work together to construct their own ocean drifters. Image credit: NOAA Students watch as their ocean drifters are tested for buoyancy and ability to hold a payload. Image credit: NOAA
Students watch as their ocean drifters are tested for buoyancy and ability to hold a payload. Image credit: NOAA Students participate in a water density demonstration. Image credit: NOAA Participants in AOML's 2016 Bring Your Child to Work Day. Image credit: NOAA

 

100th Successful Dropsonde Cruise for the Western Boundary Time Series Project

In October, AOML scientists, technicians and engineers involved in the Western Boundary Time Series (WBTS) project completed the 100th successful dropsonde cruise in the Florida Current since the project's inception in 2000. The dropsonde cruises measure volume transport in the Florida Current using an out-of-service telephone cable between Florida and Grand Bahama Island. The oceanographic dropsonde is a key instrument in taking these measurements and has been used since the 1960s. The modern version was pioneered at AOML in the mid-1990s via the introduction of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver inside the instrument. Further improvements over the years have led to a very robust dropsonde that provides highly accurate estimates of depth-averaged ocean velocity. Collecting 100 dropsonde cruises over the past 15 years is an important milestone for the WBTS project and has been an effort of many, from the engineers who build the dropsondes, to the technicians who process the data, to the numerous engineers and technicians who go to sea to collect the data on small boats every year. 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

AOML oceanographer Andy Stefanick deploys the dropsonde at one of the stations during the 100th successful dropsonde cruise on October 15, 2015.

 

Underwater Gliders Retrieved After Successful Third Mission

 

On November 16th-18th, AOML physical oceanographers partnered with the University of Puerto Rico to successfully recover two underwater gliders from the Caribbean Sea aboard the M/V La Sultana of the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez. Over the course of the summer, the gliders successfully transected a region in the eastern Caribbean providing approximately 3000 profile observations of temperature, salinity, oxygen, and surface as well as depth-average current velocities. The gliders were also on location during the passage of Tropical Storm Erika in August, gathering temperature measurements that are critical to understanding the ocean’s role in how storms form, evolve, and change in intensity. These data should also provide researchers with a better understanding of the ocean’s response to the passage of storms which, in turn, will improve ocean models used in hurricane forecasts.

 

The recovery involved a field team at sea retrieving and a pilot team at AOML steering the gliders to an area where they could be safely recovered. After recovery, the gliders will be brought to the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez in La Parguera where they will undergo a thorough refurbishment in preparation for their next deployment. Included in the refurbishment will be repairs to the body of one of the gliders after researchers found evidence of a shark encounter, including puncture wounds and an embedded shark tooth.

 

For the latest observations and data from the underwater gliders, click here.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

 

The glider is secured after being brought aboard the R/V La Sultana. Image credit: NOAA An image of the successfully retrieved glider, including puncture marks from an encounter with a shark. Image credit: NOAA
An image of the puncture marks the glider received from an encounter with a shark. Image credit: NOAA      The glider retrieval team found a shark tooth embedded in the body of the glider. Image credit: NOAA



Coral Team Conducts Monitoring Activities at Cheeca Rocks

AOML coral researchers conducted a number of reef monitoring activities during the month of October at Cheeca Rocks off of Islamorada, Florida. Among the activities was the installation of new sensors to measure pH and photosynthetic light levels at the on-site MapCO2 buoy. The team also conducted benthic surveys and deployed a pH sensor at an inshore patch reef where they are conducting an experiment to examine the impacts of bleaching across Florida Keys reefs. They were also joined by a colleague from the University of Miami who conducted photo mosaic surveys of the reefs. A photo mosaic is a tool used by researchers to map reefscapes and involves the stitching together of hundreds of photos taken simultaneously across the reef to form one giant image. Photo mosaics provide coral researchers with an important tool to more accurately document community-wide changes in reef health. Read more about AOML's efforts to monitor coral bleaching across the Caribbean here.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

Dive flag on the surface at Cheeca Rocks. Image credit: NOAA A school of brightly colored fish swim just beneath the surface at the Cheeca Rocks site. Image credit: NOAA
A University of Miami coral scientist collects photos of a reef to be compiled into a photo mosaic. Image credit: NOAA An AOML coral researcher inspects a bleached coral at Cheeca Rocks in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA     

A juvenile green turtle on the reef at Cheeca Rocks. Image credit: NOAA

 

October 2015 Western Boundary Time Series Cruise

AOML oceanographers are participating in a joint research cruise to study the Meridional Overturning Circulation onboard the R/V Endeavor during October 3-20. The team will sail from Fort Lauderdale, FL to collect roughly 55 full-depth conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles in the Florida Current and the Deep Western Boundary Current east of the Bahamas.  The scientists will also work with their partners from the University of Miami to recover, redeploy, and maintain three tall moorings and nine smaller moored instruments during this cruise in support of the NOAA Western Boundary Time Series project and its partner National Science Foundation project.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

AOML scientists work with members of the ships' crew to recover the CTD package at the end of a 3 hour hydrographic cast. Image credit: NOAA AOML scientists collect water samples and acoustic Doppler current profiler data from the CTD package after recovery. Image credit: NOAA 
An AOML scientist (right) explains to one of the university students participating in the cruise how data is acoustically downloaded from one of the NOAA subsurface moored instruments. Image credit: NOAA An image of the R/V Endeavor, the vessel being used for the joint NOAA & NSF research cruise, the night before sailing. Photo credit: NOAA 

 

AOML Researchers Take Water Samples at Annual King Tide

On September 29th, researchers from AOML's Environmental Microbiology Lab along with scientists from Florida International University’s Southeast Environmental Research Center collected water samples along Miami Beach during a king tide event, the highest astronomical tide of the year. Sample sites were located adjacent to pumps installed by the City of Miami Beach to actively pump super-tidal floodwaters out of the streets and back into Biscayne Bay. AOML’s team continuously monitored and collected water samples over a 5-hour period at locations in Maurice Gibb Memorial Park,  along 14th Street, and at 27th Street and Indian Creek Drive. During sampling, physical water properties such as temperature, salinity, pH, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen content were also measured. For more on this sampling effort, click here.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

Floodwaters cover portions of Indian Creek Dr. in Miami Beach. Image credit:NOAA Vehicles submerged in king tide floodwaters near Indian Creek Dr. Image credit: NOAA Scientists collect a water sample from a pump location along Indian Creek Dr. Image credit: NOAA
Scientists from FAU and AOML collect water samples at a pumping location along Indian Creek Dr. Image credit: NOAA King tide floodwaters inundate parts of Indian Creek Dr. in Miami Beach. Image credit: NOAA Scientists bottle a sample collected from floodwaters being pumped back into Biscayne Bay. Image credit: NOAA
Scientists bottle samples collected from floodwaters being pumped back into Biscayne Bay. Image credit: NOAA Vehicles submerged in king tide floodwaters near Indian Creek Dr. Image credit: NOAA King tide floodwaters inundate portions of Collins Ave in Miami Beach. Image credit: NOAA

 

SEFSC & AOML Partner to Tag Leatherback Turtles in the Gulf of Mexico

A team of NOAA scientists from the Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) and AOML conducted a survey aboard the NOAA research vessel Hildebrand to capture, tag and release leatherback sea turtles in the Gulf of Mexico. The survey, which took place off the coast of the Florida Panhandle, was the first directed research on leatherbacks in Gulf waters. The team of scientists sought to obtain accurate information on these endangered animals in order to answer questions relating to habitat use, migrations, and distribution within the Gulf region. After locating a turtle with help from spotters in NOAA aircraft, each turtle was secured with a net and brought to the vessel to be measured and equipped with a satellite tag, which will collect data on dive patterns and water temperatures in addition to long-term movement. The team successfully tagged a total of six turtles during the survey. The team also assisted in the scheduled release of a female leatherback that had stranded earlier in September off of Fort Walton Beach, FL. The turtle, which had been rehabilitated at the local Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park, was brought aboard the R/V Hildebrand in Destin, FL and successfully released 20 miles offshore.

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images)

 

NOAA scientists inspect the net that is used to capture and secure leatherback turtles for study. Image credit: NOAA A leatherback sea turtle is captured with a net off the bow of the R/V Hildebrand in the Gulf of Mexico. Image credit: NOAA NOAA scientists secure a leatherback turtle before applying a satellite tag on the back of the R/V Hildebrand. Image credit: NOAA
The NOAA team readies the R/V Hildebrand for the release of a rehabilitated leatherback. Image credit: Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park. The NOAA team along with personnel from the Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park work to secure a leatherback prior to release. Image credit: Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park The NOAA team successfully captured, tagged, and released six leatherback turtles during the five-day survey. Image credit: NOAA

 

AOML Conducts Water Quality Monitoring in Florida Bay

 

AOML scientists aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith conducted the bimonthly water quality research cruise in support of the South Florida Project during the week of September 21st. The AOML South Florida Project (SFP), and its associated field operations, have enabled scientists and resource managers to keep a watchful eye on the sensitive marine habitats found in the region and have served as a sentinel during periods when the ecosystem has been subjected to extreme events such as hurricanes, harmful algal blooms (HAB), and more recently, potential oil spill contaminants. Additionally, the AOML SFP has produced a comprehensive, long-term baseline regarding regional circulation, salinity, water quality, and biology for the ecosystem.

Photo credit: Sarah Rivard, NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

The R/V Walton Smith as it leaves Miami for a water quality monitoring cruise in Florida Bay to support AOML's South Florida Project. Image credit: Sarah Rivard, NOAA.  

 

AOML Begins Biscayne Bay Canal Sampling Surveys

 

AOML's ecosystem assessment and modeling group is collaborating with the protected species and biodiversity lab at NOAA's SEFSC to begin a water quality monitoring survey of South Florida's Biscayne Bay watershed. Biscayne Bay is a designated Habitat Focus Area under NOAA’s Habitat Blueprint, a program which offers opportunities for NOAA to partner with organizations to address coastal and marine habitat loss and degradation issues. Scientists will collect continuous temperature, salinity, turbidity, dissolved organic matter, and fluorescense measurements, as well as discrete samples for Chrlorophyll a, nutrients, and phytoplankton. The surveys will occur quarterly and will examine the sources of potential contaminants from canals and waterways, and the subsequent effects these contaminants will have on the Bay.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

AOML scientists conduct a survey to monitor water quality and other parameters in the Biscayne Bay watershed. Image credit: NOAA   An aerial view of Boca Chita Key surrounded by Biscayne Bay. Image credit: National Park Service

 

Video: Coral Spawning in the Florida Keys

AOML coral scientists participated in a NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service-led project to document coral spawning in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary during August & September 2015. The project aims to measure spawning success for two imperiled Caribbean species, elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata) and mountainous star coral (Orbicella faveolata) in the Florida Keys. The team collected gametes from both species to be used in experiments that aim to improve the understanding of factors that may enhance the likelihood of coral larvae to survive and settle on the ocean floor. Experiments will also assess impacts of current and future global environmental changes, such as ocean acidification, on these vulnerable early life stages of corals. Click on the image below to view a video of a spawning mountainous star colony.

Photo and Video credit: NOAA   (click on image to view video)

Mountainous Star Coral (Orbicella faveolata) spawning in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA

 

Tropical Storm Fred

On September 5th, NASA's Global Hawk took off from Wallops Island, Virginia to fly a 24 hour mission over Tropical Storm Fred. The Global Hawk launched dropwindsondes to measure the wind structure of the storm and gathered other meteorological data such as temperature and moisture with instruments on board. The Global Hawk is part of NOAA’s Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT) field campaign. 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

NASA's Global Hawk is inspected inside its hangar between flights into Tropical Storm Fred. Image credit: NOAA Image taken from NASA's Global Hawk during a NOAA mission to profile Tropical Storm Fred on September 5th, 2015. Image credit: NOAA

 

Tropical Storm Erika

AOML is partnering with Woods Whole Oceanographic Institution in their effort to deploy eight more Air-Launched Autonomous Micro Observer (ALAMO) floats in the path of Tropical Storm Erika. ALAMO profiling floats will be air-deployed through a chute in the belly of a US Air Force C-130 airplane. ALAMOs are a smaller Argo-style floats that will make 11 profile per day of the upper ocean down to 300m.  They communicate via satellite and AOML will receive and conduct data processing to upload ocean temperature data onto the Global Telecommunication System so that it can be incorporated into ocean models. The ALAMO floats are manufactured by MRV Systems.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

  AOML assists WHOI and the USAF in their deployment of ALAMO floats in front of TS Erika. Image credit: NOAA  

 

Hurricane Danny

Photos taken from NOAA's P-3 aircraft during Hurricane Hunter flights conducted on Saturday, August 22nd and Sunday, August 23rd inside Hurricane Danny. Peaking at Category 3 strength on Friday, August 21, Danny had maximum sustained winds of 115 mph as it churned in the Atlantic. Danny then weakened to a tropical depression due to interaction with high levels of wind shear and a mass of dry air in the Caribbean as it moved across the Lesser Antilles. The Hurricane Hunter missions profiled Danny's wind structure with Tail Doppler Radar, conducted various projects in support of the Hurricane Research Division's 2015 Field Program, and surveyed the ocean ahead of the storm in order to improve forecasts.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Cloud cover as seen out of the window of the P-3 aircraft as it flies through Hurricane Danny. Image credit: NOAA Hurricane researcher Lisa Bucci analyzing storm data aboard the P-3 aircraft. Image credit: NOAA A hurricane researcher monitors storm conditions at a work station aboard the P-3 aircraft. Image credit: NOAA
View of one of the P-3's turbo propellers as the aircraft approaches Hurricane Danny. Image credit: NOAA A radar image that depicts the P-3's flight pattern during one of the Hurricane Hunter missions to investigate Hurricane Danny on Friday, August 21, 2015. Image credit: NOAA A hurricane researcher monitors storm conditions at a work station aboard the P-3 aircraft. Image credit: NOAA
           A view inside the cabin of the P-3. Image credit: NOAA  

 

Scientists Conduct Juvenile Sport Fish Surveys in Florida Bay

A team of scientists from NOAA's AOML and Southeast Fisheries Science Center have conducted a series of surveys in Florida Bay this year as part of an ongoing project to investigate how juvenile sport fish in the bay respond to changes in water quality and habitat resulting from Everglades restoration. During the survey, scientists collected water quality and seagrass measurements and conducted otter trawls to sample the juvenile sport fish populations.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

AOML scientist assesses the seagrass cover during a survey in Florida Bay. Image credit: NOAA     A juvenile barracuda, one of the sport fish targeted in the study, is measured and recorded. Image credit: NOAA A pufferfish shows up in one of the trawls. Image credit: NOAA
Surveys are conducted in the waters of Florida Bay, just off Key Largo. Image credit: NOAA Another haul brings up a shrimp that has been cooked by warm benthic temperatures exceeding 38 degrees Celsius. Image credit: NOAA The contents of an otter trawl is assessed. Image credit: NOAA
          A toadfish, another non-target species found in the trawls. Image credit: NOAA            A seahorse is found in one of the trawls. Image credit: NOAA           Another non target species found in the trawl: A scrawled cowfish. Image credit: NOAA
          A researcher measures a Gray Snapper, one of the targeted sport fish species in the study. Image credit: NOAA A juvenile spotted sea trout, one of the targeted sport fish in the study, is measured and recorded. Image credit: NOAA  

 

Underwater Gliders Begin Third Mission

On July 14th, 2015, AOML physical oceanographers deployed one of two sea gliders in the Caribbean from the University of Puerto Rico's R/V La Sultana. The third deployment will continue the project's mission to gather important data in the Caribbean and Tropical North Atlantic Ocean to help with hurricane intensity forecasting and provide valuable information about the role the ocean plays in tropical cyclone development. What's new for this mission? For the first time, the gliders will collect ocean current velocity profiles in addition to the real-time temperature, salinity, and oxygen data. AOML scientists also equipped the glider with an improved battery which will allow the glider to record more profile measurements. The second of the two gliders will be deployed in the Tropical North Atlantic in the upcoming weeks.

 

Track the progress of the gliders by visiting the project page

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 AOML staff make final preparations to the glider aboard the R/V La Sultana. Image credit: NOAA

The glider rests on the deck of the R/V La Sultana before deployment. Image credit: NOAA

 

The glider rests on the deck of the R/V La Sultana before deployment. Image credit: NOAA 
 AOML staff work alongside Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System and University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez personnel to launch the glider. Image credit: NOAA The glider in the water after launch. Image credit: NOAA  The glider in the water after launch. Image credit: NOAA 

 

July Hydrographic Survey Conducted in the Florida Straits

AOML physical oceanographers and interns conducted a hydrographic survey along the 27th north parallel in the Florida Straits aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith on July 14-15 as a component of the Western Boundary Time Series project. These 2-day cruises are designed to calibrate daily estimates and quantify Florida Current volume transport and water mass changes.

 

Cruise participants also set adrift a series of messages in bottles written by Miami schoolchildren who attended AOML's Open House in May. These messages were cast into the Florida Current, a component of the larger Gulf Stream which travels northward from Florida to Newfoundland before crossing the Atlantic Ocean.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 Messages written by local schoolchildren are bottled up and ready for deployment. Image credit: NOAA The R/V F.G. Walton Smith docked in Miami. Image credit: NOAA 

 

AOML staff load the CTD onto the deck of the F.G. Walton Smith prior to departure. Image credit: NOAA AOML physical oceanographers and summer interns with the CTD on the back of the F.G. Walton Smith. Image credit: NOAA

 

Messages in bottles on the deck of the F.G. Walton Smith awaiting deployment. Image credit: NOAA AOML Intern Ciro Liutti gets ready to release a message in a bottle off the back of the F.G. Walton Smith into the Florida Current. Image credit: NOAA

 

Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) 2015

Photos of AOML microbiologists, interns and citizen scientists collecting samples on Ocean Sampling Day at sites in the Florida Keys, Miami, and La Jolla.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

A troop of girl scouts collect a water sample at a NOAA Ocean Sampling Day site in La Jolla, CA. Image credit: NOAA A citizen scientist uses a MyOSD kit to collect a sample in the waters off Bill Baggs State Park on Key Biscayne. Image credit: NOAA An AOML intern bottles a sample at Tennessee Reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA
     
 AOML staff assist citizen scientists in collecting a water sample at Matheson Hammock Park in Miami. Image credit: NOAA An AOML citizen scientists logs her sampling effort into the MyOSD iOS application. Image credit: NOAA  AOML staff and interns collect a sample at Tennessee Reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA
     
An AOML citizen scientist scopes out a sampling site on Key Biscayne. Image credit: NOAA  AOML staff and interns take water quality readings on a handheld YSI meter at Tennessee Reef in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA AOML staff and citizen scientists wade out into Biscayne Bay to collect their sample at Matheson Hammock Park. Image credit: NOAA 

 

ACCRETE Scientists Establish Ocean Acidification Monitoring Site at Flower Garden Banks

AOML's ACCRETE (Acidification, Climate and Coral Reef Ecosystems TEam) lab successfully established the final of three sentinel climate and ocean acidification monitoring sites at the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary in the Gulf of Mexico this month. Below are a few photos taken by ACCRETE researchers of the biodiversity found on the reefs at the Flower Garden Banks.

 

Photo credit: Lauren Valentino, NOAA  
(click on photos to view larger images)

ACCRETE researcher Lauren Valentino collects data from a Benthic Ecosystem Acidification Monitoring System station in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA A Christmas Tree Worm on a reef in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA A juvenile Jack-knife fish on a reef in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA
Sunset from the R/V Manta in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA Schools of fish glide over a reef in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA A Spotted eel checks out the camera during a reef dive in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA
The NOAA research vessel Manta at port in Galveston, Texas before its sail to the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA      A close-up of the grooves on a brain coral head in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA Yellow Cluster anemones in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Image credit: NOAA
  A Christmas Tree worm makes its way across a bed of coral polyps. Image credit: NOAA  

  

Hurricane Researchers "Feel The Force" at the Frost Museum of Science 

On Saturday, May 30th, personnel from AOML's Hurricane Research Division along with Outreach & Communications staff participated in the Patricia and Philip Frost Museum of Science’s annual “Feel the Force” event. The one-day outreach event drew over 1000 people who learned about preparing their homes and families to deal with disasters, especially hurricanes. HRD scientists staffed the permanent museum exhibit dedicated to explaining how scientists fly into storms to gather scientific data.  In addition to speaking to people about the experience of flying into tropical cyclones, they also took the opportunity to explain the latest innovations in technology being tested this season and how their work will benefit hurricane intensity forecasts. HRD scientists also granted media interviews throughout the day and led a team of children in the Museum’s “Wild and Crazy Weather Challenge”.


Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

AOML hurricane researcher talks with a museum visitor. Image credit: NOAA AOML hurricane researcher talks with a museum visitor. Image credit: NOAA AOML hurricane researcher talks with a museum visitor. Image credit: NOAA

 

AOML Participates in CBS4 Miami's 10th Annual Weather Day 

On Thursday, May 21st, AOML hurricane researcher Dr. Eric Uhlhorn participated in the 10th annual Weather Day event at Marlins Park, hosted by local news station CBS4. Thousands of elementary and middle school students from across Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties were on hand as part of the fun-filled, science-focused educational field trip at the ballpark. The pre-game program was designed to teach students the basic concepts of weather and climate and how these topics relate to living in South Florida. Dr. Uhlhorn discussed the unmanned technology that NOAA uses to conduct research on hurricanes, including ocean gliders and the Coyote unmanned aircraft system.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

AOML researcher Dr. Eric Uhlhorn with the Coyote UAS and ocean glider technology. Image credit: NOAA Marlins players take a photo with the Coyote UAS and the ocean glider. Image credit: NOAA Dr. Eric Uhlhorn discusses the ocean glider technology with CBS4 chief meteorologist Craig Setzer. Image credit: NOAA

NOAA hurricane research technology on the field at Marlins Park. Image credit: NOAA

 

 

 NOAA and Partners Host Open House for 1300

NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) and the National Marine Fisheries Service/Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) partnered with the University of Miami Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science to host an open house May 14th-16th. The three day event brought over 1300 people to Virginia Key to learn about a variety of scientific topics including hurricane research, climate science, oceanography, local fisheries, coral communities, and endangered species. NOAA and UM scientists were on-hand to describe their research projects and answer questions and visitors got to participate in a number of hands-on demonstrations at AOML, SEFSC, the University of Miami, and the Maritime and Science Technology (MAST) Academy Land SHARC and Weather on Wheels mobile outreach programs.

 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

AOML hurricane researchers discuss the Coyote drone. Image credit: NOAA AOML scientist discusses the global carbon cycle with a group of students. Image credit: NOAA AOML researcher discusses ocean currents with a group of students. Image credit: NOAA
Students measure the weight of a sponge at the MAST Academy Landsharc mobile outreach bus. Image credit: NOAA Students watch physical oceanography demos at AOML. Image credit: NOAA A group of students participate in a environmental microbiology demonstration with AOML scientists. Image credit: NOAA
University of Miami researcher shows off a toadfish to a group of students at UM's new Marine Technology & Life Sciences Seawater Complex. Image credit: NOAA A pair of students examine a toadfish at the UM Marine Technology & Life Sciences Seawater Complex. Image credit: NOAA A group of students participate in an activity aboard the MAST LandSharc mobile outreach bus. Image credit: NOAA
A pair of students observe microorganisms under the microscope. Image credit: NOAA University of Miami researchers describe the SUSTAIN wave-wind tank to a group of Open House participants. Image credit: NOAA An Open House visitor participates in a fishing activity at NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center. Image credit: NOAA
AOML Coral Ecologist discusses ocean acidification impacts on corals with a group of students. Image credit: NOAA An AOML Researcher shows off the ocean glider technology. Image credit: NOAA An AOML researcher tours the SOMMA van with a group of students. Image credit: NOAA

  

 

ACCRETE Marks 13th Trip Aboard Global Reef Expedition Cruise

 

During the months of March & April, ACCRETE researchers participated in the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation's Global Reef Expedition cruise which took place in the waters of the British Indian Ocean Territory. Some of the areas explored included the Maldives and the Chagos archipelago, home to the world's largest Marine Protected Area. Aboard the R/V Golden Shadow and working under the theme "Science Without Borders," the Global Reef Expedition team researches remote coral reef locations around the globe documenting their health to better understand which factors are crucial to reef resilience. ACCRETE has participated in 12 Global Reef Expedition cruises since June 2012.

 

Photo credit: Lauren Valentino, NOAA  
(click on photos to view larger images)
 

The R/V Golden Shadow exploring the Chagos archipelago. A school of Two-Stripe Damselfish (Reticulate Dascyllus) hover near a coral head. A hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) glides over a reef in the Chagos Marine Protected Area.
One of many uninhabited islands in the Chagos archipelago. Chagos is home to the world's largest Marine Protected Area. ACCRETE researcher Lauren Valentino collects a coral core to be analyzed using computed tomography scanning (CT scan) to determine growth rates over time.   Juvenile Two-banded Tomato Anemonefish (Amphiprion frenatus) take refuge in a vibrant anemone.
Black-spotted Egg Cowrie (Calpurnus verrucosus). An octopus camouflages itself on the reef bottom. Gideon Butler of the University of San Diego lays a transect along a reef.

 

An Acropora colony in the Chagos archipelago. ACCRETE team member Lauren Valentino participates in a Google Hangout on Ocean Acidification. 
An ACCRETE researcher glides over a reef in the Chagos archipelago.
A close-up of an Acropora colony. Juvenile Emperor Angelfisn (Pomacanthus imperator). Chagos sunset aboard the R/V Golden Shadow.

 

NOAA Conducts Interdisciplinary Research Cruise in the Caribbean Aboard the Nancy Foster  

 

AOML partnered with NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) to conduct an interdisciplinary research cruise aboard the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster from April 11, 2015 through June 3, 2015. The cruise began in the U.S. Virgin Islands and extended westward across the northern Caribbean to Mexico. Researchers from various institutions conducted a myriad of biological and physical oceanographic surveys during the three month cruise.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

NOAA Ship Nancy Foster in port, St. Thomas, USVI. Image credit: NOAA The track of the Nancy Foster through the U.S. Virgin Islands over the course of Leg 1. Image credit: NOAA Dan Otis of the University of South Florida measures remote-sensing reflectance with a spectro-radiometer, which measures individual wavelengths of light. Image credit: NOAA
CTD package being recovered by NOAA Corps officers Jim Europe, Aras Zygas and Alexis Sabine (DPNR). Image credit: NOAA Dan Otis of the University of South Florida measures remote-sensing reflectance with a spectro-radiometer, which measures individual wavelengths of light. Image credit: NOAA Dan Otis of the University of South Florida measures remote-sensing reflectance with a spectro-radiometer, which measures individual wavelengths of light. Image credit: NOAA
      Josué Millán from the University of Puerto Rico collects a water sample from a CTD bottle. Image credit: NOAA  Top: Ryan Smith (NOAA AOML, Chief Sci) on the back deck, Daniel Otis (USF) filtering some water samples. Bottom: Vanessa Wright (UVI), Trika Gerard (NOAA SEFSC), Sarah Privoznik (UM/CIMAS) sorts through the plankton sample and Josue Millan Lugo (UPR) gets the filtering apparatus ready for the next station. Image credit: NOAA  University of the Virgin Islands participant Vanessa Wright gets ready to recover the CTD. Image credit: NOAA
Plot of the upper ocean currents measured around Jamaica over a two-day period.  These vectors are an average of the flow in the upper 18-90 meters of the water column.  The strongest currents (almost 1 meter/second, ~2 knots) are observed around the west end of the island. Image credit: NOAA   Another warm day out here in the USVI. Image credit: NOAA The crew recovers one of the S10 nets that are used to collect the larval fish. Image credit: NOAA 
The crew recovering the S10 net off the back of the Nancy Foster. Image credit: NOAA Alexis Sabine sorts through the contents of the S10 net. Image credit: NOAA Kathryn Doering examines larvae under the microscope. Image credit: NOAA
      Kathryn Doering examines larvae under a microscope. Image credit: NOAA         John Lamkin holds up a flying fish that found its way aboard. Image credit: NOAA Leg 1 crew including: John Lamkin, Sarah Privoznik, Dan Otis, Vanessa Wright, Josue Millan, Trika Gerard, Ryan Smith, Kathryn Doering, Aras Zygas, Alexis Sabine, Grant Rawson, and Jim Europe. Image credit: NOAA 
Libby Johns directing the winch and bridge during the CTD cast. Image credit: NOAA  The Nancy Foster team deploys the MOCNESS net during Leg 2 in the northern Caribbean. Image credit: NOAA A lionfish larvae. Image credit: NOAA 
Aki and Raul working on the microscopes. Image credit: NOAA A pair of bottlenose dolphins cruising behind the Nancy Foster. Image credit: NOAA Rinsing down the net after a 100 meter journey. Image credit: NOAA
 Atlantic bluefin tuna larvae collected on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef. Image Credit: NOAA A lobster larvae. Image credit: NOAA  

Image of a parrotfish larvae under the microscope. Image credit: NOAA

 Panoramic image of the island of St. Thomas taken aboard the Nancy Foster. Image credit: NOAA 

 

 

Underwater Gliders Retrieved After Successful Second Mission

 

On April 27th, AOML physical oceanographers partnered with the University of Puerto Rico to successfully recover two underwater gliders from the Caribbean Sea aboard the R/V La Sultana of the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez. The gliders successfully transected a region in the eastern Caribbean providing approximately 3000 profile observations of temperature, salinity, oxygen, and surface as well as depth-average current velocities. 

 

The recovery involved a field team at sea retrieving the gliders and a pilot team at AOML steering them to an area where they could be safely recovered. After recovery, the gliders were brought to the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez in La Parguera where they underwent a thorough refurbishment in preparation for their next deployment in July.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

The R/V La Sultana on its way out to collect the gliders. Image credit: NOAA The recovery team pulls up alongside the glider. Image credit: NOAA A glider is brought aboard the R/V La Sultana. Image credit: NOAA
The glider is placed in its carousel for safe transport. Image credit: NOAA Both gliders on board the R/V La Sultana on their way back to shore. Image credit: NOAA The recovery team on board the R/V La Sultana after a successful retrieval mission. Image credit: NOAA
The R/V La Sultana. Image credit: NOAA      The gliders getting a rinse down from the team. Image credit: NOAA One of the gliders getting a tune up before its next mission. Image credit: NOAA

 

Happy Earth Day from AOML!

Photos of AOML personnel celebrating Earth Day 2015 on land and at sea!

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

Happy Earth Day from AOML's PhOD staff in Tahiti. Image credit: NOAA Happy Earth Day from the team aboard the NOAA ship Nancy Foster in the Caribbean. Image credit: NOAA Happy Earth Day from AOML's Ocean Carbon Cycle Group. Image credit: NOAA  
Happy Earth Day from AOML's Environmental Microbiology Group. Image credit: NOAA Happy Earth Day from the South Florida Project team in the Florida Straits. Image credit: NOAA    

 

April Hydrographic Survey Conducted in the Florida Straits 

 

AOML physical oceanographers conducted a hydrographic survey along the 27th north parallel in the Florida Straits aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith on April 9-10, 2015. The cruise was conducted as part of the ongoing Western Boundary Time Series project, which is designed to quantify Florida Current volume transport and water mass changes. Scientists measured full water column values of salinity, temperature, and oxygen using CTD equipment. This survey and others help to calibrate daily estimates of the Florida Current volume transport.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

The R/V F.G. Walton Smith passes the Miami skyline on its way to the Florida Straits. Image credit: NOAA

 

 

27N Cruise leaves the Port of Miami bound for the Florida Straits. Image credit: NOAA AOML scientists Erik Valdes, Pedro Pena, and Robert Roddy check on the CTD equipment prior to deployment. Image credit: NOAA Sunset aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith. Image credit: NOAA
   
 AOML scientists Pedro Pena and Robert Roddy monitor the retrieval of the CTD. Image credit: NOAA  AOML scientist Robert Roddy takes a sample from a CTD cast. Image credit: NOAA  AOML scientist Robert Roddy hoses down the CTD after its final deployment of the day. Image credit: NOAA

 

 

The deck on the R/V Walton Smith where the CTD equipment is launched and retrieved. Image credit: NOAA




AOML Hosts Young Scientists on Take Your Child To Work Day

 

On April 10, 2015, AOML personnel participated in the annual 'Take Your Child to Work Day' tradition. Parents and students shared a day full of science which included a tour of the UM Rosenstiel School's new Marine Technology & Life Sciences Seawater Complex (MTLSSC). At the MTLSSC, participants observed the SUSTAIN wave tank in action, interacted with the resident aplysia, and toured a coral nursery. Thanks to all the AOML staff and young scientists who joined us this year!

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Students observe marine organisms under a microscope in the lab at the MTLSSC building. Image credit: NOAA A student peers down at coral species in a nursery at the UM Rosenstiel School. Image credit: NOAA Group photo of the participants at the Rosenstiel School's MTLSSC Building. Image credit: NOAA

 

March Numeric Nutrient Criteria Study Cruise

AOML scientists conducted a Numeric Nutrient Criteria Study cruise Wednesday and Thursday, March 18-19th in Biscayne Bay off of Broward and Miami-Dade Counties aboard the NOAA R/V Hildebrand. The study provides concurrent water column and coral reef status data for four coral assemblies off of Miami-Dade and Broward County. These results will be employed by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to determine numeric nutrient criteria for the coastal waters of SE Florida.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Jack Stamates and Charles Featherstone preparing the CTD (conductivity-temperature-density) instrument for the next cast into the coastal ocean near Miami-Dade. Image credit: NOAA Charles Featherstone notating a sample bottle from a cast of the CTD instrument package off of Broward County. Image credit: NOAAMarch Numeric Nutrient Criteria Study Cruise collects data at Fowey Light. Image credit: NOAA
 

 

 Science Communication Workshop 

Jana Goldman, a science communicator and plain language trainer, traveled to Miami on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 to engage AOML employees in a workshop on how to communicate science effectively to non-science audiences. While participating in the science communications exercises, AOML staff learned a myriad of successful plain language techniques as well as effective methods to develop clear scientific messages.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Jana Goldman teaches AOML scientists about plain language communication. Image credit: NOAA Ruben Van hooidonk receives an AWESOME prize! Image credit: NOAA  Jim Hendee shares his plain language paragraph to the group. Image credit: NOAA 
 Claudia Schmid uses a human prop during NED talks. Image credit: NOAA    Uli Rivero and Erica Rule use a balloon as an explanatory prop during their NED talk. Image credit: NOAA  



February 2015 Western Boundary Time Series Cruise

AOML physical oceanographers Molly Baringer, Ulises Rivero, Pedro Pena, Andrew Stefanick, Grant Rawson, Jay Hooper and Francis Bringas conducted a Western Boundary Times Series cruise aboard the UNOLS R/V Endeavor on February 15, 2015. Molly Baringer, AOML Deputy Director, served as chief scientist and was supported by additional crew from the University of Puerto Rico. Scientists measured full water column values of salinity, temperature, and oxygen. Scientists also telemetered data from a series of moorings along the 26th north parallel for a joint NOAA and National Science Foundation program designed to monitor the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation current. Francis Bringas also conducted a fall rate experiment that consisted of deploying 200 XBTs from different launch heights.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

A frame on deck of the R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA  Preparing the CTD rosette and niskin bottles for a cast. Image credit: NOAA Jay Hooper conducting an XBT fall rate test. Image credit: NOAA 
 The team reviewing the CTD data on R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA  Preparing a new ADCP for the CTD rosette. Image credit: NOAA  Installing a new ADCP on the CTD rosette. Image credit: NOAA
 A CTD rosette cast off of the stern of the R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA  Sampling from the nisken bottles. Image credit: NOAA Preparing an inverted echo sounder for deployment. Image credit: NOAA
 Inverted echo sounder retrieved from the ocean floor. Image credit: NOAA CTD under sparkling clear blue water. Image credit: NOAA   
     

 

 

Working on the deck of the R/V Endeavor during high seas. Image credit: NOAA Waves crashing on deck of R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA Sunrise from the deck of the R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA
Miguel Figurrola Hernaez running the CTD console on the midnight to noon shift. Image credit: NOAA   RV Endeavor as viewed from a small boat. Image credit: NOAA Analysis goes on 24 hours. Andrew Stefanick on the night shift. Image credit: NOAA
Finishing the CTD casts with the help of Lynne Butler (Center). Image credit: NOAA  Ethan Irons is one of the three crew running the winch to owed the CTD, The crew runs 24 hour watches: 4 hours on and 8 hours off. Image credit: NOAA.  
     
Panoramic view from R/V Endeavor. Image credit: NOAA
 

 

AOML Hosts Satellite Workshop

Scientists from University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies visited AOML to provide training on how to use direct broadcast polar-orbiting satellite data for the enhancement of environmental forecasting and decision making. The course focused on the use of data from the new AOML antenna, including SuomiNPP and Aqua/Terra instrument observations and products. 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 

Miami-based researchers learn how to use direct broadcast polar-orbiting satellite data. Image credit: NOAA Miami-based researchers learn how to use direct broadcast polar-orbiting satellite data. Image credit: NOAA
   

 

Underwater Gliders Second Deployment

On February 6, 2015, AOML physical oceanographers deployed two underwater sea gliders from the University of Puerto Rico's R/V La Sultana in hopes of improving prediction of hurricane intensity. This is the second deployment trial after two gliders had a successful first mission at sea from July-November 2014. The main goal of this project is to deploy a pilot network of underwater gliders in the Caribbean Sea and Tropical North Atlantic Ocean to help with hurricane intensity forecasting and provide valuable information about the role the ocean plays in tropical cyclone development.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Grant Rawson tests the technological equipment before deploying the two underwater gliders. Image credit: NOAA  Underwater glider ready for deployment. Image credit: NOAA Professor Julio Morell and Luis Pomales of The University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez deploy the underwater glider. Image credit: NOAA 
   Professor Julio Morell of The University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez and AOML's Grant Rawson, watch the glider drift away after deploying it on February 6, 2015. Image credit: NOAA  

 

PIRATA Northeast Extension Cruise 

On December 28, 2014 scientists with the PIRATA Northeast Extension (PNE) cruise deployed drifters, collected CTD casts and deployed/recovered moorings. Aboard the UNOLS R/V Endeavor, the PNE project is a joint AOML and PMEL effort to expand the PIRATA array of tropical Atlantic ATLAS moorings into the northern and northeastern sectors of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

AOML scientists deploy drifters, collect CTD casts and recover moorings. Image credit: NOAA  AOML scientists deploy drifters, collect CTD casts and recover moorings. Image credit: NOAA

 

 

DOC Gold Medal Awarded to HWRF  

Congratulations to the Hurricane Research Division and the Hurricane Weather Research & Forecast System modeling team for receiving DOC Gold Medal and aiding in the advancement of hurricane intensity prediction.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Dr. Frank Marks, Dr. S. G. Gopalakrishnan, and Dr. Thiago Quirino pose with their Department of Commerce Gold Medal Awards. Image credit: NOAA

 

Swearing-In Ceremony of U.S Representatives 

Dr. Robert Atlas was a guest at the swearing-in ceremony for U.S. Representatives Wasserman Schultz, Frederica Wilson, and Lois Frankel at the Fort Lauderdale Federal Courthouse on January 23, 2015. Pictured at left (L to R) are Congresswoman Lois Frankel, Judge Beth Bloom Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz, Dr. Fred Lippman, and Congresswoman Wilson. Pictured at right are Dr. Robert Atlas and Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

 Congresswomen Frankel, Wasserman Schultz, and Wilson at their 2015 swearing-in ceremony. Image credit: NOAA AOML's Director Dr. Robert Atlas with Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Image Credit: NOAA

 

 

 

 Hydrographic Survey Conducted in the Florida Straits

PhOD personnel Ryan Smith, Grant Rawson, and Jay Hooper conducted a hydrographic survey along 27N in the Florida Straits aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith on January 12-13, 2015. The cruise was part of the Western Boundary Time Series project, which is designed to quantify Florida Current volume transport and water mass changes.  This survey and others help to calibrate daily estimates of the Florida Current volume transport derived from a submarine telephone cable deployed across the Straits. Divers also exchanged a project pressure gauge on the west side of the 27N section. 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

PhOD personnel load equipment onto the R/V F.G. Walton Smith in preparation for their hydrographic survey in the Florida Straits. Image Credit: NOAA PhOD's Grant Rawson stabilizes the equipment before it is loaded onto the R/V F.G. Walton Smith. Image Credit: NOAA PhOD's Jay Hooper reviews the real time oceanographic data collected on previous surveys. Image Credit: NOAA

 

Congratulations to Universty of Miami RSMAS Graduates Who Worked at NOAA

Shannon Jones, Austin Flinn, and Chloe Fleming celebrated their graduation from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. All three worked with NOAA in south Florida as part of their graduate research. Austin Flinn also received funding for his degree from NOAA's Environmental Partnership Program (EPP). Congratulations to all graduates! 

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

University of Miami Rosenstiel School graduates who worked with NOAA during their graduate research. From left to right: Shannon Jones, Austin Flinn, and Chloe Fleming. Image credit: NOAA

Hydrographic Survey Conducted in the Florida Straits

Ryan Smith, Robert Roddy, and Jay Hooper conducted a hydrographic survey along 27N in the Florida Straits aboard the R/V F.G. Walton Smith December 11-12, 2014. The cruise was performed as part of the Western Boundary Time Series project, which conducts regular surveys such as this to quantify Florida Current volume transport and water mass changes in the Straits of Florida. This survey and others also help to calibrate daily estimates of the Florida Current volume transport derived from a submarine telephone cable deployed across the Straits.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

AOML's CTD/O2/LADCP instrument package is recovered, secured, and ready for sampling following the first station at 27N in the Florida Straits. Image credit: NOAA CTD/O2/LADCP instrument being loaded onto the deck of the R/V F.G. Walton Smith. Image credit: NOAA Jay Hooper and Robert Roddy draw samples from large niskin bottles fixed to the CTD/O2/LADCP instrument package for dissolved oxygen and salinity sensor calibration following a station. Image credit: NOAA.

 

Living Oceans Foundation's Global Reef Expedition

AOML coral scientists Renee Carlton participated in the Living Oceans Foundation (LOF) Global Reef Expedition (GRE) to the Solomon Islands from October 27, 2014 through November 25, 2014. Carlton collected seawater carbon dioxide data and coral cores for calcification analysis as part of the ongoing collaboration between LOF and OCED to obtain baseline ocean acidification-related data from remote coral reef locations across the Pacific Ocean.

Photo credit: Living Oceans Foundation
(click on photos to view larger images)

Renee Carlton diving in the Solomon Islands as part of the ongoing collaboration between the Khaled bin Sultan's Living Oceans Foundation and AOML's ACCRETE team to obtain baseline ocean acidification related data from remote coral reef locations across the Pacific Ocean. Image credit: Living Oceans Foundation

 

Dr. Thomas Carsey Presents Observations of FL's Coastal Oceans with Key Biscayne's Citizen Science Project

On November 12, 2014, Dr. Thomas Carsey presented results from investigations his team has conducted in the waters off of Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties for the Key Biscayne's Citizen Science Project.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Dr. Thomas Carsey presents observations of Florida's coastal oceans with the Key Biscayne Citizen Science group. Image credit: NOAA

 

The Central Caribbean Marine Institute (CCMI) Redeploys Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Buoy

During the month of October, the Central Caribbean Marine Institute (CCMI) finished redeploying their buoy, which is part of the Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS).  The buoy was first deployed in October 2013 and needs to be returned to land each year for cleaning, repainting and instrumentation swapout.  The buoy was towed from its deployment site on October 14th and returned to position on October 29th.  AOML's Mike Jankulak worked remotely with CCMI personnel to update the buoy's programming and develop procedures for instrument configuration.  As of October 31st all data feeds from the buoy to AOML and NDBC has fully resumed.

Photo credit: Central Caribbean Marine Institute
(click on photos to view larger images)

Researchers with the Central Caribbean Marine Institute (CCMI) finished redeploying their CREWS buoy off Little Cayman Island during the month of October. Image credit: Central Caribbean Marine Institute

 

 

NOAA Researchers Take Water Samples at Annual 'King Tide'

On October 9th, researchers from AOML's Environmental Microbiology Lab monitored and collected water samples in Maurice Gibb Memorial Park during the King Tide, the highest astronomical tide of the year.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Dr. Chris Sinigalliano cleans out a sampling bottle before taking the final sample. Image credit: NOAA Scientists collect water samples at Maurice Gibb Memorial Park during the annual King Tide. Image credit: NOAA Miami Beach pumps flood water from the King Tide back into Biscayne Bay. Image credit: NOAA
     
Floodwater is pumped back into Biscayne Bay during the peak of high tide. Image credit: NOAA Dr. Chris Sinigalliano takes water quality measurements with a YSI sensor. Image credit: NOAA   The image on the left was taken at 8:30am and the image on the right was taken at 10:30am, when the tide was at it's peak. Image credit: NOAA

 

NOAA Leadership Visits AOML and SEFSC

NOAA's Vice Admiral Devany, Dr. Richard Spinrad, and Craig McLean, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Programs and Administration joined AOML and SEFSC to learn about current research and happenings in South Florida.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Craig McLean, NOAA's Deputy Assistant Administrator for Programs and Administration, examines the Coyote Unmanned Aerial System as AOML's Director Dr. Robert Atlas looks on. Image credit: NOAA NOAA Leadership examines the Coyote Unmanned Aerial System during a discussion about hurricane research. Image credit: NOAA Dr. Gustavo Goni stops NOAA Deputy Assistant Administrator Craig McLean from taking the underwater glider display home with him. Image credit: NOAA
   Vice Admiral Devany and Dr. Spinrad pose with the Coyote Unmanned Aerial System. Image credit: NOAA  

 


Coral Bleaching at Cheeca Rocks

Images of corals taken on September 17, 2014, at Cheeca Rocks, which is in the Florida Keys off of Islamorada.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Colony of Montastraea cavernosa infected with black-band disease at Cheeca Rocks in the Florida Keys. Colony is ~3 feet in diameter. Image credit: NOAA  Colony of Dichocoenia stokesii that is infected with Black-Band Disease at Cheeca Rocks in the Florida Keys.  Black-band disease is known to be stimulated by warm water, perhaps due to to a weakening of the immune response of the coral.  The black band is a microbial consortium that moves across the coral colony at a rate of 3mm to 1cm/day, leaving behind bare, dead coral skeleton. Image credit: NOAA Extensive areas of large colonies of bleached Orbicella faveolata, which was listed on the Endangered Species Act as a threatened species by NOAA within the past month. Image credit: NOAA
     
A large colony of Colpophyllia natans, which is a type of brain coral at Cheeca Rocks in the Florida Keys. The coral in the picture is about 6 feet across and 4-5 feet tall. Image credit: NOAA Coral bleaching occurring in coral colonies at Cheeca Rocks in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA Extensive areas of large colonies of bleached Orbicella faveolata, which was listed on the Endangered Species Act as a threatened species by NOAA within the past month. Image credit: NOAA

 

Coral Bleaching in the Northern Florida Keys

Images of corals taken from Horseshoe Reef and Little Grecian Rocks, in the vicinity of Key Largo, Florida.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Orbicella faveolata colony starting to bleach at Horseshoe Reef in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA Completely bleached Agaricia agaricites colony at Horseshoe Reef in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA Partially bleached Acropora palmata colony at Little Grecian Rocks in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA
     
Completely bleached Millepora alcicornis, Agaricia agaricites and Porites asteroides colonies at Horseshoe Reef in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA Partially bleached Orbicella faveolata colony at Horseshoe Reef in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA   

 


Coyote UAS Released in Hurricane Edouard

NOAA successfully deployed a Coyote Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) directly into a hurricane from a NOAA P-3 Hurricane Hunter for the first time. During flights conducted September 15-17, 2014 out of Bermuda, scientists aboard the P-3 aircraft received meteorological data from the Coyote UAS in both the eye and surrounding eyewall of Hurricane Edouard.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Pre-launch schedule and safety briefing on the P3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft. Image credit: NOAA Coyote UAS aboard NOAA WP-3D Orion. Image credit: NOAA Jason Dunion and Rich Henning discuss the flight plan into Hurricane Edouard. Image credit: NOAA
     
 Drew Osbrink and Eric Redweik of Sensintel and NOAA's Dr. Joe Cione monitor data from the  Coyote after it was launched into  Hurricane Edouard. Image credit: NOAA Rear Admiral Anita Lopez shakes hands with Bermuda Premier Michael Dunkley. Image credit: NOAA  



Hurricane Edouard

Photos taken from a NOAA P-3 aircraft during a Hurricane Hunter flight inside Hurricane Edouard.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Low cloud bands inside the eye of Hurricane Edouard. Image credit: NOAA  Upper rim of eyewall inside the eye of Hurricane Edouard. Image credit: NOAA   Wind streaks and whitecaps on the ocean surface from Hurricane Edouard's 65 kt winds. Image credit: NOAA
     

 

X-Band Satellite Receiver Installation

On Tuesday, September 16, 2014, a new X/L-band satellite receiving system was installed on the roof of AOML, augmenting the existing L-band antenna. This new system will expand AOML capabilities to receive telemetry and create products from the next generation of NOAA's polar-orbiting environmental satellites, including Suomi NPP and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) constellation. Infrared and microwave sounder data from the system will be delivered to NOAA NCEP for assimilation in NWP models.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

The Positioner portion of the X-Band Satellite Receiver is adjusted on AOML's roof. Image credit: NOAA       The reflector is lowered onto the positioner. Image credit: NOAA        The radome is lifted to the roof of the AOML building. Image credit: NOAA
     
The radome hangs above AOML. Image credit: NOAA Attaching the radome. Image credit: NOAA The X Band Satellite Receiver sits on AOML's rooftop. Image credit: NOAA

 

 

Coyote UAS Logs Successful Calibration Flight

AOML, NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center, and partners from Sensitel completed a successful calibration flight of the Coyote unmanned aircraft system (UAS) on September 3, 2014.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

Briefing at Avon Park before the coyote launch. Image credit: NOAA  Ground station at Avon Park. Image credit: NOAA P3 in flight above Avon Park. Image credit: NOAA 
     
 Chute for launching the Coyote UAS. Image credit: NOAA  Coyote pilot station on the P3. Image credit: NOAA  Monitoring the in-flight Coyote UAS from the piloting station on the P3. Image credit: NOAA
     
The Coyote UAS is ready to launch out of the P3. Image credit: NOAA P3 crew on the ground at Avon Park. Image credit: NOAA   

 

 

AOML Records Coral Bleaching off South Florida Coast

Images of bleached corals off of Key Biscayne, Florida and in Biscayne National Park.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Bleached colony of Orbicella franksi. This species was recently added to the Endangered Species Act's threatened list.  Mottled areas are where pigmentation remains.  Photo taken at Long Reef, Biscayne National Park on August 30, 2014. Image credit: NOAA Bleaching on Emerald Reef, Key Biscayne, FL. Image credit: NOAA Extensive bleaching of the soft coral Palythoa caribaeorum on Emerald Reef, Key Biscayne, FL. Image credit: NOAA 
     
Bleached fire coral (Millepora alcicornis) in Biscayne National Park. Image credit: NOAA Bleached colony of Oribicella annularis in Biscayne National Park. This species was recently added to the Endangered Species Act's threatened list. Image credit: NOAA  Bleached colony of Meandrina meandrites at Emerald Reef, Key Biscayne, FL. Image credit: NOAA 
     
      Extensive bleaching of the soft coral Palythoa caribaeorum on Emerald Reef, Key Biscayne, FL. Image credit: NOAA Bleached colony of Porites divaricata at Dome Reef in Biscayne National Park. Image credit: NOAA     

 

 

The image below on the left shows a coral colony at Cheeca Rocks from July 2013. The image at the right shows the same coral colony in August 2014, with the colony now bleached.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Photo from Cheeca Rocks in summer 2013. Image credit: NOAA Photo from Cheeca Rocks in summer 2014. Image credit: NOAA
   

 

Undergraduates From University of Miami Learn About Ocean Observations with AOML

Undergraduate students from the University of Miami started off the fall semester with a tour of AOML's ocean observing platforms and the engineering group that makes it all happen.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images)

Students examine a CTD rosette to learn how oceanographers collect deep ocean water samples. Image credit: NOAA
 

 

U.S. Representative Mario Diaz-Balart Visits AOML

The Congressman representing Florida's 25th district took a tour of AOML to learn about current research supporting south Florida and the Nation.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 
 

Dr. Gustavo Goni illustrates how gliders are used at AOML for ocean and hurricane research. Image credit: NOAA       Dr. Gustavo Goni shows Congressman Diaz-Balart an Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT) which is used to obtain information on ocean temperature. Image credit: NOAA     AOML Director Dr. Robert Atlas and Congressman Diaz-Balart examine a coral sample. Image credit: NOAA
     
Dr. Derek Manzello presents to Congressman Diaz-Balart on the use of digital imagery in ocean acidification research. Image credit: NOAA Congressman Diaz-Balart examining an ocean water sample under the microscope. Image credit: NOAA  Dr. Chris Sinigalliano describes research being conducted in the Environmental Microbiology Program at AOML. Image credit: NOAA
     
AOML's Director Dr. Robert Atlas briefs Congressman Diaz-Balart on the use of a GPS dropsonde in hurricane research. Image credit: NOAA Dr. Joseph Cione gives a briefing on the Coyote UAS to Congressman Diaz-Balart. Image credit: NOAA Congressman Diaz-Balart discusses The Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model with AOML hurricane researchers. Image credit: NOAA 
     

 

Wave Glider Deployments in the Gulf of Mexico

AOML joined Mississippi State University to deploy three wave gliders in the Gulf of Mexico to observe hurricanes and underlying oceans.

Photo credit: NOAA and Liquid Robotics 
(click on photos to view larger images)
  

A wave glider collecting data at sea. Image credit: Liquid Robotics Underwater view of a wave glider at sea. Image credit: Liquid Robotics A wave glider on deck. Image credit: Liquid Robotics
     
      Wave glider awaiting deployment on deck of the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory's R/V Tommy Munro. Image credit: NOAA Preparing the wave glider for deployment. Image credit: NOAA  Preparing the wave glider for deployment. Image credit: NOAA
     
Preparing to deploy the wave gliders. Image credit: NOAA       Wave glider ready for deployment off the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory's R/V Tommy Munro. Image credit: NOAA A wive glider dives under the waves after being deployed. Image credit: Liquid Robotics 
     
A wave glider at sea. Image credit: Liquid Robotics A wave glider at sea. Image credit: Liquid Robotics       A wave glider ready for deployment off the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory's R/V Tommy Munro. Image credit: NOAA
     
Crew prepares wave glider for deployment. Image credit: NOAA

 

Crew prepares wave glider for deployment. Image credit: NOAA 

 

 

Happy 9th Anniversary, Dr. Atlas! 

AOML employees commemorated Dr. Robert Atlas' nine years (and counting) as the AOML director!

Photo credit: NOAA (click on photos to view larger images)

Dr. Atlas (left) celebrates 9 years as the AOML director with AOML scientists. Image credit: NOAA  
   

 

Maug Research Cruise

Photos from two recent cruises to the Pacific Island of Maug to study the effect of ocean acidification on coral ecosystems.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

 

Research vessel deploying to the island of Maug. Image credit: NOAA  Research vessel ready to deploy to the island of Maug. Image credit: NOAA Approaching the Maug caldera. Image credit: NOAA 
     
 View from a small dive boat inside Maug caldera. Image credit: NOAA Diver examines a coral reef structure (Porites rus) off the coast of Maug. Image credit: NOAA  Data loggers collect observations of light and pH at Maug. Image credit: NOAA 
     
 Coral plates left on-site for three months to measure bioerosion rates. Image credit: NOAA A funnel is used to collect carbon dioxide gas bubbles from the seeps near the coral reefs at Maug. Image credit: NOAA   AOML/CIMAS researcher Dr. Ian Enochs uses a drill to take a coral core sample to measure changes in growth. Image credit: NOAA
     
 AOML/CIMAS researcher Dr. Ian Enochs diving in carbon dioxide bubbles at the Maug reefs. Image credit: NOAA  A rainbow forms inside the Maug caldera. Image credit: NOAA 
     

 

CREWS Station Deployment 2014

Photos from Little Cayman CREWS Station deployed by NOAA AOML.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

Little Cayman CREWS Station. Image credit: NOAA Underwater view of Little Cayman CREWS Station. Image credit: NOAA
   

 


Ocean Glider Deployment 2014

Photos from Caribbean deployment sites by NOAA AOML.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

Two underwater gliders are ready for deployment from the R/V La Sultana, off the coast of Puerto Rico. Image credit: NOAA  The first glider in position for deployment from the R/V La Sultana. Image credit: NOAA The first glider successfully deployed and transmitting data. Image credit: NOAA
     
  AOML's Principal Investigator, Dr. Gustavo Goni, takes a selfie with the glider before deployment. Image credit: NOAA    

 

Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) 2014

Photos of AOML researchers and interns at Ocean Sampling Day sites in Ft. Lauderdale, the Florida Keys, and La Jolla, California.

Photo credit: NOAA   (click on photos to view larger images) 

An AOML intern rinses out a bucket used to collect water samples for Ocean Sampling Day 2014. Image credit: NOAA AOML interns prepare a bucket to be used to collect water samples on Ocean Sampling Day 2014. Image credit: NOAA A student collects water samples for Ocean Sampling Day near Port Everglades, Florida. Image credit: NOAA
 An AOML intern scoops up a water sample on Ocean Sampling Day 2014 in the Florida Keys. Image credit: NOAA Two AOML interns work to collect a sample off the Florida Keys on Ocean Sampling Day 2014. Image credit: NOAA  Dr. Chris Sinigalliano tests the water quality with a portable YSI meter. Image credit: NOAA 
 Water samples are filtered at AOML's Environmental Microbiology Lab in Miami, Florida. Image credit: NOAA Filtered samples collected on Ocean Sampling Day are placed in a bag to be frozen and shipped for analysis. Image credit: NOAA Ocean Sampling Day data is uploaded to the myOSD app by AOML scientist Kelly Goodwin in La Jolla, California. Image credit: NOAA 

 

 

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