1. Wanninkhof, R., G.-H. Park, and G. Berberian. Oxygen Winkler titrations by NOAA/AOML in support of Deepwater Horizon spill monitoring. NOAA Technical Memorandum, OAR-AOML-99, 15 pp., 2011

    Abstract:

    This report details the measurement of oxygen (O2) by the Winkler method on the ships Nancy Foster, Ocean Veritas, Brooks McCall, Henry B. Bigelow, and Pisces in response to the oil spill of the Deepwater Horizon 252 well. Most of the data are from near the well and were obtained from July 1, 2010 to August 30, 2010. The purpose of these measurements was to assess the accuracy of the oxygen sensors on a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor, henceforth referred to as CTD/O2, and to determine if the CTD/O2 sensor provided (low) biased readings in the presence of oil. Based on the analyses, we believe that the O2 analyses from the CTD/O2 and Winkler systems on the ships were accurate to within 2% (approximately equal to 4 µmol/l, approximately equal to 0.1 ml/l, or approximately equal to 0.15 ml/l), with exceptions listed in the following paragraph. The depression in O2 values observed by the CTD/O2 at depths of 1000-1300 m in the layer with diffuse oil were verified by the Winkler measurements and are attributed to oxidation of the oil and associated gas. Based on the Winkler measurements, we cannot conclusively recommend adjustments to the CTD/O2 data. A qualitative assessment suggests that the output of CTD/O2 sensors on the Brooks McCall and Ocean Veritas agreed with each other and with the Winkler measurements to within 2%. The CTD/O2 sensor on the Pisces appeared to read low by about 3% when compared with the Henry B. Bigelow CTD/O2 and Winkler O2 values that agreed well with each other. The Nancy Foster had the largest dataset of Winkler O2 values for comparison. These values were about 2.6 ± 2% higher than the CTD/O2 values in water depths of 100-1000 m but showed larger positive deviations of up to 10% at the surface and in deep water which we cannot explain.

  2. Zhang, J.-Z., G.A. Berberian, and R. Wanninkhof. Long-term storage of natural water samples for dissolved oxygen determination. Water Research, 36(16):4165-4168, doi:10.1016/S0043-1354(02)00093-3 2002

    Abstract:

    A method for preserving natural water samples for dissolved oxygen analysis is recommended. The conventional method of using greased glass stoppers has been found to cause a 12% increase in oxygen concentration over a one-month period as a result of evaporation of water sample through micro-gaps and concurrent intrusion of air into the water sample bottles. Sealing the sample bottles with water has been found to be the optimal storage method. It permits a 100.2 ? 0.3% recovery of dissolved oxygen concentration from storage seawater samples over four months.

  3. Berberian, G.A., and A.Y. Cantillo. Oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of Mexico and Straits of Florida: Fall 1976. NOAA Data Report, OAR-AOML-36 (PB2000-106209), 64 pp., 1999

    Abstract:

    NOAA conducted an investigation in the Gulf of Mexico and the Straits of Florida of oceanographic conditions and nutrients and trace metal levels in seawater during September and October 1976 aboard the NOAA Ship Researcher. This report lists the chemical data obtained from 118 stations. Collection and analyses methodologies, as well as results, are described.

  4. Castle, R.D., R.H. Wanninkhof, J.L. Bullister, S.C. Doney, R.A. Feely, B.E. Huss, E. Johns, F.J. Millero, K. Lee, D. Frazel, D. Wisegarver, D.Greeley, F. Menzia, M. Lamb, G. Berberian, and L.D. Moore. Chemical and hydrographic profiles and underway measurements from the eastern North Atlantic during July and August of 1993. NOAA Data Report, ERL-AOML-32 (PB98-131865), 82 pp., 1998

    Abstract:

    From July 4-August 30, 1993, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study (OACES) and Radiatively Important Trace Species (RITS) programs participated in an oceanographic research cruise aboard the NOAA ship Malcolm Baldrige. The objectives of the OACES component were to determine the source and sink regions of CO2 in the equatorial and North Atlantic during the summer and to establish a baseline of total carbon inventory in the region. Data were collected from 5°S to Iceland along a nominal longitude of 20°W. This report presents only the OACES-related data from legs 1, 2A, and 2B, including hydrography, nutrients, carbon species, dissolved oxygen, total inorganic carbon, chlorofluorocarbons, total alkalinity, pH, and salinity. Included are contour plots of the various parameters and descriptions of the sampling techniques and analytical methods used in data collection.

  5. Cantillo, A.Y., and G.A. Berberian. MESA New York Bight Project water column chemistry data cruises No. 6-12 of the NOAA Ship Ferrel, April-November 1974. NOAA Technical Memorandum, ERL-AOML-92 (PB98-140759), 74 pp., 1997

    Abstract:

    During the period April-November 1974, seven oceanographic cruises, denoted WCC 6-12, were conducted by the NOAA Ship Ferrel to obtain samples of seawater and suspended particulates from the New York Bight Apex for chemical analyses. This report presents the chemical data obtained from these samples.

  6. Zhang, J.-Z., and G.A. Berberian. Method 366.0: Determination of dissolved silicate in estuarine and coastal waters by gas segmented continuous flow colorimetric analysis. In Methods for the Determination of Chemical Substances in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Matrices, Second Edition. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA-600-R-97-072, 13 pp., 1997

    Abstract:

    No abstract.

  7. Lantry, T.P., M.F. Lamb, J.C. Hendee, R.H. Wanninkhof, R.A. Feely, F.J. Millero, R. Byrne, E.T. Peltzer, W.D. Wilson, and G.A. Berberian. Chemical and hydrographic measurements from the equatorial Pacific during boreal spring 1992. NOAA Data Report, ERL-AOML-27 (PB95-227773), 134 pp., 1995

    Abstract:

    From February 24 to May 19, 1992, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Climate and Global Change Program sponsored a major cooperative effort with the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS) to study the role of equatorial processes on CO2 cycling in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific during the 1991-1992 El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event. The NOAA Ship Malcolm Baldrige performed four transequatorial sections in the region, and this report presents hydrographic and chemical data from that cruise, including tables of the following data from each station: hydrography from each CTD cast at the bottle trip depths, dissolved oxygen, fCO2, DIC, pH, TAlk, nutrients, and TOC. Descriptions of the sampling techniques and analytical methods used in the collection and processing of these data are also presented.

  8. Wanninkhof, R.H., R.A. Feely, D.K. Atwood, G.A. Berberian, W.D. Wilson, P.P. Murphy, and M.F. Lamb. Seasonal and lateral variations in carbon chemistry of surface water in the eastern equatorial Pacific during 1992. Deep-Sea Research, Part II, 42(2-3):387-409, doi:10.1029/96JC01348 1995

    Abstract:

    During the (boreal) spring and fall of 1992, the NOAA Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study did an intensive survey of upper water column (2 values were significantly lower in the spring, while sea surface temperatures south of the equator were higher. The seasonal change in surface water chemistry at the equator is due to changes in upwelling of nutrient and carbon-enriched water. Oxygen and CO2 anomalies at the surface point to approximately a three-fold increase in upwelling of thermocline water in the fall compared to the spring. The large-scale spatial variations in the surface chemistry patterns remained unchanged between spring and fall. There was a westward decrease in surface-water carbon and nitrate concentrations and a strong north to south asymmetry with higher carbon and nitrate values south of the equator. This pattern is attributed to input of carbon and nutrients with the South Equatorial Current from the east. Using velocities obtained from surface drifter tracks, along with reasonable gas exchange estimates and a "Redfield analysis" to account for export biological production, this westward decrease in carbon and nutrients can be quantitatively accounted for in the region from 0°to 3°S and 110°W to 140°W in the spring. In the fall the calculated concentration decrease is greater than observed, which is attributed to input from local equatorial upwelling along the pathway of water transit.

  9. Frazel, D.W., G.A. Berberian, J. McElroy, and G.L. Hitchcock. Radiatively Important Trace Species (RITS) 1990: Tropical Pacific Ozone Minimum Expedition--nutrient, chlorophyll-a, and primary productivity data. NOAA Data Report, ERL-AOML-19 (PB91-178087), 33 pp., 1991

    Abstract:

    During the period of January 3-February 18, 1990, a multifaceted oceanographic research cruise called the RITS 1990 Tropical Pacific Ozone Minimum Expedition was made on the NOAA ship Malcolm Baldrige in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. The objective of the cruise was to study processes controlling radiatively important trace species in the region of the tropical Pacific ozone minimum in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean. Measurements from hydrocasts for nutrients, phytoplankton biomass, and primary productivity were made during this period. This report represents the hydrographic, nutrient, and biological data from this cruise.

  10. Frazel, D.W., and G.A. Berberian. Distributions of chlorophyll and primary productivity in relation to water column structure in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 4(3):241-251, doi:10.1029/GB004i003p00241 1990

    Abstract:

    Latitudinal variations in the megascale (103 km) distribution of biological properties are described in relation to water column structure between 60°N and 7°N in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean. Stations were occupied along a meridional transect of stations at 20°W in August-September 1988, during the third leg of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Change Expedition. An additional transect to the south (38°N to 7°N) was occupied to extend the total range of latitudinal observations. Chlorophyll-a concentrations were highest in the northern latitudes (-3), decreasing to >0.2 mg m-3 in the vicinity of the subtropical gyre, south of 40°N. The nitracline was associated with a shoaling of the pycnocline in the northern latitudes. At 7°N, high chlorophyll concentrations (approximately 0.5 mg m-3) and enhanced primary productivity (375.5 mg C m-2 d-1) were associated with a lens of fresh Amazon River Water.

  11. Frazel, D.W., G.A. Berberian, and G.L. Hitchcock. Global Change Expedition: Nutrient, chlorophyll-a, and primary productivity data, NOAA Ship Mt. Mitchell, July 14-September 6, 1988. NOAA Data Report, ERL-AOML-15 (PB90-220336), 66 pp., 1989

    Abstract:

    During the period of 14 July-6 September 1988, a multifaceted oceanographic research cruise called the Global Change Expedition was made on the NOAA Ship Mt. Mitchell in the North Atlantic Ocean. The objective of the cruise was to study the atmospheric and oceanic processes affecting the biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and trace metals. Emphasis was made on compounds of these elements that would influence the radiation balance of the earth and, hence, of global climate. Measurements from hydrocasts for nutrients, phytoplankton biomass, and productivity were made on a daily basis during the period. The report represents the biological and chemical (nutrient) data from the cruise.