1. Hu, X., M.F. Nuttall, H. Wang, H. Yao, C.J. Staryk, M.M. McCutcheon, R.J. Eckert, J.A. Embresi, M.A. Johnston, E.L. Hickerson, G.P. Schmahl, D.P. Manzello, I.C. Enochs, S. DiMarco, and L. Barbero. Seasonal variability of carbonate chemistry and decadal changes in waters of a marine sanctuary in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Marine Chemistry, 205:16-28, doi:10.1016/j.marchem.2018.07.006 2018

    Abstract:

    We report seasonal water column carbonate chemistry data collected over a three-year period (late 2013 to 2016) at Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) located on the subtropical shelf edge of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The FGBNMS hosts the northernmost tropical coral species in the contiguous United States, with over 50% living coral cover. Presented here are results from samples of the upper 25 m of the water column collected from September 2013 to November 2016. Additionally, following a localized mortality event likely associated with major continental flooding in summer 2016, water samples from up to ~250 m depth were collected in the broader FGBNMS area on a rapid response cruise to examine the seawater carbonate system. Both surface (alkalinity (TA) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) vary over small ranges (2391 ± 19 μmol kg−1 and 2060 ± 19 μmol kg−1, respectively) for all times-series samples. Temperature and salinity both played an important role in controlling the surface water carbonate system dynamics, although temperature was the sole significant factor when there was no flooding. The FGBNMS area acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 in winter and a CO2 source in summer, while the time-integrated CO2 flux is close to zero (−0.14 ± 1.96 mmol-C m−2 yr−1). Results from three cruises, i.e., the Gulf of Mexico and East Coast Carbon Project (GOMECC-1) in 2007, the rapid response study, and the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cruise (GOMECC-3), revealed decreases in both pH and saturation state with respect to aragonitearag) in subsurface waters (~100–250 m) over time. These decreases are larger than those observed in other tropical and subtropical waters. Based on reaction stoichiometry, calculated anthropogenic CO2 contributed 30–41% of the overall DIC increase, while elevated respiration accounted for the rest.

  2. Le Quéré, C., R.M. Andrew, P. Friedlingstein, S. Sitch, J. Pongratz, A.C. Manning, J.I. Korsbakken, G.P. Peters, J.G. Canadell, R.B. Jackson, T.A. Boden, P.P. Tans, O.D. Andrews, V.K. Arora, D.C.E. Bakker, L. Barbero, M. Becker, R.A. Betts, L. Bopp, F. Chevallier, L.P. Chini, P. Ciais, C.E. Cosca, J. Cross, K. Currie, T. Gasser, I. Harris, J. Hauck, V. Haverd, R.A. Houghton, C.W. Hunt, G. Hurtt, T. Ilyina, A.K. Jain, E. Kato, M. Kautz, R.F. Keeling, K. Klein Goldewijk, A. Körtzinger, P. Landschützer, N. Lefèvre, A. Lenton, S. Lienert, I. Lima, D. Lombardozzi, N. Metzl, F. Millero, P.M.S. Monteiro, D.R. Munro, J.E.M.S. Nabel, S. Nakaoka, Y. Nojiri, X.A. Padin, A. Peregon, B. Pfeil, D. Pierrot, B. Poulter, G. Rehder, J. Reimer, C. Rödenbeck, J. Schwinger, R. Séférian, I. Skjelvan, B.D. Stocker, H. Tian, B. Tilbrook, F.N. Tubiello, I.T. van der Laan-Luijkx, G.R. van der Werf, S. van Heuven, N. Viovy, N. Vuichard, A.P. Walker, A.J. Watson, A.J. Wiltshire, S. Zaehle, and D. Zhu. Global carbon budget 2017. Earth System Science Data, 10(1):405-448, doi:10.5194/essd-10-405-2018 2018

    Abstract:

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the global carbon budget – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify the five major components of the global carbon budget and their uncertainties. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, respectively, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on land-cover change data and bookkeeping models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) and terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) are estimated with global process models constrained by observations. The resulting carbon budget imbalance (BIM), the difference between the estimated total emissions and the estimated changes in the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere, is a measure of imperfect data and understanding of the contemporary carbon cycle. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ. For the last decade available (2007–2016), EFF was 9.4 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, ELUC 1.3 ± 0.7 GtC yr−1, GATM 4.7 ± 0.1 GtC yr−1, SOCEAN 2.4 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, and SLAND 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr−1, with a budget imbalance BIM of 0.6 GtC yr−1 indicating overestimated emissions and/or underestimated sinks. For year 2016 alone, the growth in EFF was approximately zero and emissions remained at 9.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1. Also for 2016, ELUC was 1.3 ± 0.7 GtC yr−1, GATM was 6.1 ± 0.2 GtC yr−1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, and SLAND was 2.7 ± 1.0 GtC yr−1, with a small BIM of −0.3 GtC. GATM continued to be higher in 2016 compared to the past decade (2007–2016), reflecting in part the high fossil emissions and the small SLAND consistent with El Niño conditions. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 402.8 ± 0.1 ppm averaged over 2016. For 2017, preliminary data for the first 6–9 months indicate a renewed growth in EFF of +2.0 % (range of 0.8 to 3.0 %) based on national emissions projections for China, USA, and India, and projections of gross domestic product (GDP) corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the economy for the rest of the world. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new global carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2016, 2015b, a, 2014, 2013). All results presented here can be downloaded from https://doi.org/10.18160/GCP-2017 (GCP, 2017).

  3. Robbins, L.L., K.L. Daly, L. Barbero, R. Wanninkhof, R. He, H. Zong, J.T. Lisle, W.-J. Cai, and C.G. Smith. Spatial and temporal variability of pCO2, carbon fluxes, and saturation state on the West Florida Shelf. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 123(9):6174-6188, doi:10.1029/2018JC014195 2018

    Abstract:

    The West Florida Shelf (WFS) is a source of uncertainty for the Gulf of Mexico carbon budget. Data from the synthesis of approximately 135,000 pCO2 values from 97 cruises from the WFS show that the shelf waters fluctuate between being a weak source to a weak sink of carbon. Overall, the shelf acts as a weak source of CO2 at 0.32 ± 1.5 mol m−2 yr−1. Subregions, however, reveal slightly different trends, where surface waters associated with 40–200‐m isobath in the northern and southern WFS are generally weak sinks all year, except for summer when they act as sources of CO2. Conversely, nearshore waters (2, particularly the southern shallow waters, which are a source all year round. The pCO2 of seawater has been increasing at a rate of approximately 4.37 μatm/year as compared to atmospheric pCO2 which has increased at a rate of about 1.7 μatm per year from 1996 to 2016. The annual CO2 flux has increased from −0.78 to 0.92 mol m−2 yr−1 on the shelf from 1996–2016. The WFS is emitting 9.23 Tg C/year, with the southern nearshore region emitting the most at 9.01 Tg C/year and the northern region acting as a sink of −1.96 Tg C/year. Aragonite saturation state on the WFS shows seasonal and geographic trends with values ranging from 2 to 5. Lowest values are found in winter associated with subregion <40‐m isobath.

  4. Ho, D.T., S. Ferron, V.C. Engel, W.T. Anderson, P.K. Swart, R.M. Price, and L. Barbero. Dissolved carbon biogeochemistry and export in mangrove-dominated rivers of the Florida Everglades. Biogeosciences, 14(9):2543-2559, doi:10.5194/bg-14-2543-2017 2017

    Abstract:

    The Shark and Harney rivers, located on the southwest coast of Florida, USA, originate in the freshwater, karstic marshes of the Everglades and flow through the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. In November 2010 and 2011, dissolved carbon source–sink dynamics were examined in these rivers during SF6 tracer release experiments. Approximately 80% of the total dissolved carbon flux out of the Shark and Harney rivers during these experiments was in the form of inorganic carbon, either via air–water CO2 exchange or longitudinal flux of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the coastal ocean. Between 42 and 48% of the total mangrove-derived DIC flux into the rivers was emitted to the atmosphere, with the remaining being discharged to the coastal ocean. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) represented ca. 10% of the total mangrove-derived dissolved carbon flux from the forests to the rivers. The sum of mangrove-derived DIC and DOC export from the forest to these rivers was estimated to be at least 18.9 to 24.5 mmol m−2 d−1, a rate lower than other independent estimates from Shark River and from other mangrove forests. Results from these experiments also suggest that in the Shark and Harney rivers, mangrove contribution to the estuarine flux of dissolved carbon to the ocean is less than 10%.

  5. Laurent, A., K. Fennel, W.-J. Cai, W.-J. Huang, L. Barbero, and R. Wanninkhof. Eutrophication-induced acidification of coastal waters in the northern Gulf of Mexico: Insights into origin and processes from a coupled physical-biogeochemical model. Geophysical Research Letters, 44(2):946-956, doi:10.1002/2016GL071881 2017

    Abstract:

    Nutrient inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River system into the northern Gulf of Mexico promote high phytoplankton production and lead to high respiration rates. Respiration coupled with water column stratification results in seasonal summer hypoxia in bottom waters on the shelf. In addition to consuming oxygen, respiration produces carbon dioxide (CO2), thus lowering the pH and acidifying bottom waters. Here we present a high-resolution biogeochemical model simulating this eutrophication-driven acidification and investigate the dominant underlying processes. The model shows the recurring development of an extended area of acidified bottom waters in summer on the northern Gulf of Mexico shelf that coincides with hypoxic waters. Not reported before, acidified waters are confined to a thin bottom boundary layer where the production of CO2 by benthic metabolic processes is dominant. Despite a reduced saturation state, acidified waters remain supersaturated with respect to aragonite.

  6. Bakker, D.C.E., B. Pfeil, C.S. Landa, N. Metzl, K.M. O'Brien, A. Olsen, K. Smith, C. Cosca, S. Harasawa, S.D. Jones, S.-I. Nakaoka, Y. Nojiri, U. Schuster, T. Steinhoff, C. Sweeney, T. Takahashi, B. Tilbrook, C. Wada, R. Wanninkhof, S.R. Alin, C.F. Balestrini, L. Barbero, N.R. Bates, A.A. Bianchi, F. Bonou, J. Boutin, Y. Bozec, E.F. Burger, W.-J. Cai, R.D. Castle, L. Chen, M. Chierici, K. Currie, W. Evans, C. Featherstone, R.A. Feely, A. Fransson, C. Goyet, N. Greenwood, L. Gregor, S. Hankin, N.J. Hardman-Mountford, J. Harlay, J. Hauck, M. Hoppema, M.P. Humphreys, C.W. Hunt, B. Huss, J.S.P. Ibánhez, T. Johannessen, R. Keeling, V. Kitidis, A. Körtzinger, A. Kozyr, E. Krasakopoulou, A. Kuwata, P. Landschützer, S.K. Lauvset, N. Lefèvre, C. Lo Monaco, A. Manke, J.T. Mathis, L. Merlivat, F.J. Millero, P.M.S. Monteiro, D.R. Munro, A. Murata, T. Newberger, A.M. Omar, T. Ono, K. Paterson, D. Pearce, D. Pierrot, L.L. Robbins, S. Saito, J. Salisbury, R. Schlitzer, B. Schneider, R. Schweitzer, R. Sieger, I. Skjelvan, K.F. Sullivan, S.C. Sutherland, A.J. Sutton, K. Tadokoro, M. Telszewski, M. Tuma, S.M.A.C. Van Heuven, D. Vandemark, B. Ward, A.J. Watson, and S. Xu. A multi-decade record of high-quality fCO2 data in version 3 of the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT). Earth System Science Data, 8:383-413, doi:10.5194/essd-8-383-2016 2016

    Abstract:

    The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) is a synthesis of quality-controlled fCO2 (fugacity of carbon dioxide) values for the global surface oceans and coastal seas with regular updates. Version 3 of SOCAT has 14.7 million fCO2 values from 3646 data sets covering the years 1957 to 2014. This latest version has an additional 4.6 million fCO2 values relative to version 2 and extends the record from 2011 to 2014. Version 3 also significantly increases the data availability for 2005 to 2013. SOCAT has an average of approximately 1.2 million surface water fCO2 values per year for the years 2006 to 2012. Quality and documentation of the data has improved. A new feature is the data set quality control (QC) flag of E for data from alternative sensors and platforms. The accuracy of surface water fCO2 has been defined for all data set QC flags. Automated range checking has been carried out for all data sets during their upload into SOCAT. The upgrade of the interactive Data Set Viewer (previously known as the Cruise Data Viewer) allows better interrogation of the SOCAT data collection and rapid creation of high-quality figures for scientific presentations. Automated data upload has been launched for version 4 and will enable more frequent SOCAT releases in the future. High-profile scientific applications of SOCAT include quantification of the ocean sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide and its long-term variation, detection of ocean acidification, as well as evaluation of coupled-climate and ocean-only biogeochemical models. Users of SOCAT data products are urged to acknowledge the contribution of data providers, as stated in the SOCAT Fair Data Use Statement. This ESSD (Earth System Science Data) “living data” publication documents the methods and data sets used for the assembly of this new version of the SOCAT data collection and compares these with those used for earlier versions of the data collection (Pfeil et al., 2013; Sabine et al., 2013; Bakker et al., 2014). Individual data set files, included in the synthesis product, can be downloaded here: doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.849770. The gridded products are available here: doi:10.3334/CDIAC/OTG.SOCAT_V3_GRID.

  7. Le Quéré, C., R.M. Andrew, J.G. Canadell, S. Sitch, J.I. Korsbakken, G.P. Peters, A.C. Manning, T.A. Boden, P.P. Tans, R.A. Houghton, R.F. Keeling, S. Alin, O.D. Andrews, P. Anthoni, L. Barbero, L. Bopp, F. Chevallier, L.P. Chini, P. Ciais, K. Currie, C. Delire, S.C. Doney, P. Friedlingstein, T. Gkritzalis, I. Harris, J. Hauck, V. Haverd, M. Hoppema, K. Klein Goldewijk, A.K. Jain, E. Kato, A. Körtzinger, P. Landschützer, N. Lefèvre, A. Lenton, S. Lienert, D. Lombardozzi, J.R. Melton, N. Metzl, F. Millero, P.M.S. Monteiro, D.R. Munro, J.E.M.S. Nabel, S.I. Nakaoka, K. O'Brien, A. Olsen, A.M. Omar, T. Ono, D. Pierrot, B. Poulter, C. Rödenbeck, J. Salisbury, U. Schuster, J. Schwinger, R. Séférian, I. Skjelvan, B.D. Stocker, A.J. Sutton, T. Takahashi, H. Tian, B. Tilbrook, I.T. van der Laan-Luijkx, G.R. van der Werf, N. Viovy, A.P. Walker, A.J. Wiltshire, and S. Zaehle. Global carbon budget 2016. Earth System Science Data, 8(2):605-649, doi:10.5194/essd-8-605-2016 2016

    Abstract:

    The global carbon budget 2016 is the 11th annual update of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and their partitioning among the atmosphere, land, and ocean. This data synthesis brings together measurements, statistical information, and analyses of model results to provide an assessment of the global carbon budget and their uncertainties for years 1959 to 2015, with a projection for year 2016.

  8. DiNezio, P.N., L. Barbero, M.C. Long, N. Lovenduski, and C. Deser. Are anthropogenic changes in the tropical ocean carbon cycle masked by Pacific decadal variability? U.S. CLIVAR Variations, 13(2):12-16, 2015

    Abstract: No abstract.

  9. Le Quéré, C., R. Moriarty, R.M. Andrew, J.G. Canadell, S. Sitch, J.I. Korsbakken, P. Friedlingstein, G.P. Peters, R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, R.A. Houghton, J.I. House, R.F. Keeling, P. Tans, A. Arneth, D.C.E. Bakker, L. Barbero, L. Bopp, J. Chang, F. Chevallier, L.P. Chini, P. Ciais, M. Fader, R.A. Feely, T. Gkritzalis, I. Harris, J. Hauck, T. Ilyina, A.K. Jain, E. Kato, V. Kitidis, K. Klein Goldewijk, C. Koven, P. Landschützer, S.K. Lauvset, N. Lefèvre, A. Lenton, I.D. Lima, N. Metzl, F. Millero, D.R. Munro, A. Murata, J.E.M.S. Nabel, S. Nakaoka, Y. Nojiri, K. O’Brien, A. Olsen, T. Ono, F.F. Pérez, B. Pfeil, D. Pierrot, B. Poulter, G. Rehder, C. Rödenbeck, S. Saito, U. Schuster, J. Schwinger, R. Séférian, T. Steinhoff, B.D. Stocker, A.J. Sutton, T. Takahashi, B. Tilbrook, I.T. van der Laan-Luijkx, G.R. van der Werf, S. van Heuven, D. Vandemark, N. Viovy, A. Wiltshire, S. Zaehle, and N. Zeng. Global carbon budget 2015. Earth System Science Data, 7(2):349-396, doi:10.5194/essd-7-349-2015 2015

    Abstract:

    Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and a methodology to quantify all major components of the global carbon budget, including their uncertainties, based on the combination of a range of data, algorithms, statistics, and model estimates and their interpretation by a broad scientific community. We discuss changes compared to previous estimates, as well as consistency within and among components, alongside methodology and data limitations. CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry (EFF) are based on energy statistics and cement production data, while emissions from land-use change (ELUC), mainly deforestation, are based on combined evidence from land-cover-change data, fire activity associated with deforestation, and models. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is measured directly and its rate of growth (GATM) is computed from the annual changes in concentration. The mean ocean CO2 sink (SOCEAN) is based on observations from the 1990s, while the annual anomalies and trends are estimated with ocean models. The variability in SOCEAN is evaluated with data products based on surveys of ocean CO2 measurements. The global residual terrestrial CO2 sink (SLAND) is estimated by the difference of the other terms of the global carbon budget and compared to results of independent dynamic global vegetation models forced by observed climate, CO2, and land-cover change (some including nitrogen-carbon interactions). We compare the mean land and ocean fluxes and their variability to estimates from three atmospheric inverse methods for three broad latitude bands. All uncertainties are reported as ±1σ, reflecting the current capacity to characterize the annual estimates of each component of the global carbon budget. For the last decade available (2005-2014), EFF was 9.0 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, ELUC was 0.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, GATM was 4.4 ± 0.1 GtC yr−1, SOCEAN was 2.6 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, and SLAND was 3.0 ± 0.8 GtC yr−1. For the year 2014 alone, EFF grew to 9.8 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, 0.6 % above 2013, continuing the growth trend in these emissions, albeit at a slower rate compared to the average growth of 2.2% yr−1 that took place during 2005-2014. Also, for 2014, ELUC was 1.1 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, GATM was 3.9 ± 0.2 GtC yr−1, SOCEAN was 2.9 ± 0.5 GtC yr−1, and SLAND was 4.1 ± 0.9 GtC yr−1. GATM was lower in 2014 compared to the past decade (2005-2014), reflecting a larger SLAND for that year. The global atmospheric CO2 concentration reached 397.15 ± 0.10 ppm averaged over 2014. For 2015, preliminary data indicate that the growth in EFF will be near or slightly below zero, with a projection of −0.6% [range of −1.6 to +0.5], based on national emissions projections for China and the USA, and projections of gross domestic product corrected for recent changes in the carbon intensity of the global economy for the rest of the world. From this projection of EFF and assumed constant ELUC for 2015, cumulative emissions of CO2 will reach about 555 ± 55 GtC (2035 ± 205 GtCO2) for 1870-2015, about 75% from EFF and 25% from ELUC. This living data update documents changes in the methods and data sets used in this new carbon budget compared with previous publications of this data set (Le Quéré et al., 2015, 2014, 2013). All observations presented here can be downloaded from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2015).

  10. Wanninkhof, R., L. Barbero, R. Byrne, W.-J. Cai, W.-J. Huang, J.-Z. Zhang, M. Baringer, and C. Langdon. Ocean acidification along the gulf coast and east coast of the USA. Continental Shelf Research, 98:54-71, doi:10.1016/j.csr.2015.02.008 2015

    Abstract:

    As part of an effort to monitor changes in inorganic carbon chemistry of the coastal ocean, near-synoptic cruises are being conducted in the northern Gulf of Mexico and along the east coast of the United States. Here we describe observations obtained on a cruise in the summer of 2012 and compare them with results from a cruise following a similar track in 2007. The focus is on describing spatial patterns of aragonite saturation state (ΩAr). This parameter is an indicator of ecosystem health, in particular, for calcifying organisms. The results show large-scale regional trends from different source waters at the northeastern and southwestern edges of the domain, along with the modulating effects of remineralization/respiration and riverine inputs. The broader patterns and changes over five years along the coast can be well described by the impacts of large-scale circulation, notably changes in source waters contributions. Changes in the well-buffered Loop Current and Gulf Stream with high ΩAr impact the waters in the southern part of the study area. The less buffered southward coastal currents with low ΩAr originating from the Labrador Sea and Gulf of St. Lawrence impact the ΩAr patterns in the northern regions. The expected 2% average decrease in ΩAr in the surface mixed layer due to increasing atmospheric CO2 levels over the 5-year period is largely overshadowed by local and regional variability from changes in hydrography and mixed layer dynamics.

  11. Bakker, D.C.E., B. Pfeil, K. Smith, S. Hankin, A. Olsen, S.R. Alin, C. Cosca, S. Harasawa, A. Kozyr, Y. Nojiri, K.M. O’Brien, U. Schuster, M. Telszewski, B. Tilbrook, C. Wada, J. Akl, L. Barbero, N.R. Bates, J. Boutin, Y. Bozec, W.-J. Cai, R.D. Castle, F.P. Chavez, L. Chen, M. Chierici, K. Currie, H.J.W. de Baar, W. Evans, R.A. Feely, A. Fransson, Z. Gao, B. Hales, N.J. Hardman-Mountford, M. Hoppema, W.-J. Huang, C.W. Hunt, B. Huss, T. Ichikawa, T. Johannessen, E.M. Jones, S.D. Jones, S. Jutterstrom, V. Kitidis, A. Kortzinger, P. Llandschutzer, S.K. Lauvset, N. Lefevre, A.B. Manke, J.T. Mathis, L. Merlivat, N. Metzl, A. Murata, T. Newberger, A.M. Omar, T. Ono, G.-H. Park, K. Paterson, D. Pierrot, A.F. Rios, C.L. Sabine, S. Saito, J. Salisbury, V.V.S.S. Sarma, R. Schlitzer, R. Sieger, I. Skjelvan, T. Steinhoff, K.F. Sullivan, H. Sun, A.J. Sutton, T. Suzuki, C. Sweeney, T. Takahashi, J. Tjiputra, N. Tsurushima, S.M.A.C. van Heuven, D. Vandemark, P. Vlahos, D.W.R. Wallace, R. Wanninkhof, and A.J. Watson. An update to the surface CO2 atlas (SOCAT version 2). Earth System Science Data, 6(1):69-90, doi:10.5194/essd-6-69-2014 2014

    Abstract:

    The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT), an activity of the international marine carbon research community, provides access to synthesis and gridded fCO2 (fugacity of carbon dioxide) products for the surface oceans. Version 2 of SOCAT is an update of the previous release (version 1) with more data (increased from 6.3 million to 10.1 million surface water fCO2 values) and extended data coverage (from 1968–2007 to 1968–2011). The quality control criteria, while identical in both versions, have been applied more strictly in version 2 than in version 1. The SOCAT website (http://www.socat.info/) has links to quality control comments, metadata, individual data set files, and synthesis and gridded data products. Interactive online tools allow visitors to explore the richness of the data. Applications of SOCAT include process studies, quantification of the ocean carbon sink, and its spatial, seasonal, year-to-year and longer term variation, as well as initialization or validation of ocean carbon models and coupled climate-carbon models.

  12. Robbins, L.L., R. Wanninkhof, L. Barbero, X. Hu, S. Mitra, S. Yvon-Lewis, W.-J. Cai, W.-J. Huang, and T. Ryerson. Air-sea exchange. In Report of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Carbon Cycle Synthesis Workshop, March 27-28, 2013. Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program and North American Carbon Program, H.M. Benway and P.G. Coble (eds.). American Carbon Program, 17-23, 2014

    Abstract:

    No abstract.

  13. Barbero, L., J. Boutin, L. Merlivat, N. Martin, T. Takahashi, S.C. Sutherland, and R. Wanninkhof. Importance of water mass formation regions for the air-sea CO2 flux estimate in the Southern Ocean. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 25:GB1005, 16 pp., doi:10.1029/2010GB003818 2011

    Abstract:

    CARIOCA drifters and ship data from several cruises in the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) of the Pacific Ocean, approximately 40°S-55°S, have been used in order to investigate surface CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) patterns. The highest DIC values were determined in regions of deep water formation, characterized by deep mixed layer depths (MLD) as estimated from Argo float profiles. As a result, these areas act as sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Using an empirical linear relationship between DIC, sea surface temperature (SST), and MLD, we then combine DIC with AT based on salinity and compute pCO2. Finally, we derive monthly fields of air-sea CO2 flux in the SAZ. Our fit predicts the existence of a realistic seasonal cycle, close to equilibrium with the atmosphere in winter and a sink when biological activity takes place. It also reproduces the impact that deep water formation regions close to the Subantarctic Front (SAF) and in the eastern part of the SAZ have on the uptake capacity of the area. These areas, undersampled in previous studies, have high pCO2, and as a result, our estimates (0.05 - 0.03 PgC yr-1) indicate that the Pacific SAZ acts as a weaker sink of CO2 than suggested by previous studies which neglect these source regions.