AOML
NOAA

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Physical Oceanography Division

Research Highlights

12/01/2014

A new approach provides a holistic view of ENSO variability during the onset, peak and decay phases

From its onset to the decay, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) plays an important role in forcing climate variability around the globe. A new study led by Sang-Ki Lee, a PhOD/CIMAS scientist, provides an efficient approach to explore the differences in the evolution of space-time patterns of sea surface temperature observed during El Niño events. Full story>>


06/15/2014

A global perspective on CMIP5 climate model biases

A recent paper published in Nature Climate Change by PhOD researchers, in collaboration with researchers at the Ocean University of China and at the University of California, found a common pattern of global SST biases in 22 climate models. The global SST biases for different regions are commonly linked with a weak AMOC simulated by these models. The paper suggests that an improvement of the simulated AMOC in climate models is needed for better climate predictions and projections. Full story>>


05/16/2014

Wind forced variability of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current south of Africa between 1993 and 2010

Researchers from PhOD and from the University of Cape Town used temperature data from the AX25 repeat XBT transect (from South Africa to Antarctica) in combination with other hydrographic and satellite observations to report a mechanism by which local winds alter the structure of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current flow south of Africa. Full story>>


04/16/2014

Impact of canonical and Modoki El Niño on tropical Atlantic SST

Results from research performed by Dillon Amaya, an undergraduate Hollings Scholar from Texas A&M University, were published recently in Journal of Geophysical Research. Dillon's work was carried out in the Physical Oceanography Division of AOML during the summer of 2013 and focused on understanding the impacts of different types of El Niño events ("canonical" and "Modoki") on sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic. The main result from the research is that Modoki El Niños fail to produce significant warming in the tropical North Atlantic, in contrast to the well known warming following canonical events. Full story>>


02/01/2014

Oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of Mexico in July 2010, during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Results from collaborative research conducted by AOML and NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center (SEFSC) in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, were recently published in Continental Shelf Research (December, 2013). PhOD oceanographers R. Smith, E. Johns, G. Goni, J. Trinanes, and R. Lumpkin, in collaboration with other researchers at AOML (M. Wood, C. Kelble, and S. Cummings) and SEFSC (J. Lamkin and S. Privoznik) report on the surface and subsurface connectivity across the eastern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) during July 2010. Full story>>


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