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1854/01:  No major changes from Partagas and Diaz's (1995a) analysis.  

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1854/02:  Utilized Ho's (1989) work - apparently not used in Partagas and 
Diaz's (1995a) analysis - to alter the track and intensity near the US.  
Inland winds over SE US reduced via Kaplan and DeMaria's (1995) inland decay 
model, though not as fast as suggested with this model due to extreme
duration of damaging winds along Georgia and South Carolina.  Ship with 
central pressures observation of 938 mb gives with subtropical latitude
wind-pressure relationship a 112 kt reading - utilizing 110 kt.  Peripheral
pressure reading of 973 mb (at 20 UTC on the 8th of September in Savannah,
Georgia) suggest winds of at least 83 kt utilizing the same subtropical 
wind-pressure relationship.  Ho used this value with other information to
estimate a 950 mb central pressure at landfall which gives 103 kt again from
the subtropical wind-pressure relationship - here we are choosing 100 kt for
the best track.  Both reports (of 938 mb and 950 mb) suggest that the storm 
reached major hurricane status over the Atlantic.  The storm is determined to 
have reintensified to hurricane status after moving back over the Atlantic 
Ocean after landfall.  Have also adjusted track to the north by about 60 nmi 
as the hurricane returned to the Atlantic to better match observed strong 
gales over Northeastern U.S. The storm is named in Ludlum's (1963) book as 
the "Great Carolina Hurricane of 1854" for its impacts in the Carolinas and 
the "Coastal Hurricane of September 1854" for its impacts in the Middle 
Atlantic and New England coasts. 

1854/02 - 2003 REVISION:

00600 09/07/1854 M= 6  2 SNBR=  20 NOT NAMED   XING=1 SSS=3
00600 09/07/1854 M= 6  2 SNBR=  21 NOT NAMED   XING=1 SSS=3
                                **

00605 09/07*264 766 110    0*272 776 110    0*280 786 110  938*288 796 110    0
00610 09/08*296 803 110    0*304 806 110    0*311 809 100    0*316 811 100  950
00615 09/09*320 813  80    0*325 815  70    0*332 815  60    0*343 805  50    0
00620 09/10*355 781  40    0*368 759  40    0*378 740  50    0*384 719  60    0
00625 09/11*388 695  70    0*390 673  80    0*394 650  90    0*395 618  90    0
00630 09/12*398 583  90    0*400 551  90    0*400 520  80    0*402 480  80    0
00635 HR GA3 SC2 
00635 HR GA3 SC2DFL1
                ****  

U.S. Hurricane Landfall Data
----------------------------
#/Date         Time   Lat    Lon   Max  Saffir- Central   States
                                  Winds Simpson Pressure  Affected
2-9/8/1854     2000Z 31.7N  81.1W  100kt  3      950mb     GA3,SC2
2-9/8/1854     2000Z 31.7N  81.1W  100kt  3      950mb     GA3,SC2,DFL1
                                                                   ****

Analysis of historical tropical storms and hurricanes impacting Georgia and
Northeast Florida by Sandrik (2001) suggests that the hurricane had also
impacted Northeast Florida with Category 1 hurricane conditions as well in
its landfall in Georgia.

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1854/03:  No major changes from Partagas and Diaz's (1995a) analysis for track. 
Inland winds over Texas reduced via Kaplan and DeMaria's (1995) inland decay 
model.  The storm is determined to reach hurricane status based upon
damage that occurred in Matagorda.  Storm is known in Ludlum's (1963)
work as the "Matagorda Hurricane of 1854".

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1854/04:  This storm was originally storm #5 in 1854 in Partagas and Diaz's 
(1995a).  No major changes from Partagas and Diaz's (1995a) analysis.  

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1854 - Additional Notes:
1.  The tropical storm listed as #4 in 1854 in Partagas and Diaz (1995a) was
not included into the HURDAT because of evidence suggesting that the storm 
did not actually exist.  Partagas and Diaz had found an unsupported 
reference to it in Tannehill (1938), but it is likely that this reference 
was really referring to storm 1854/03 which hit the coast at the same exact 
location.

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