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NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

Coastal and Estuarine Data Archaeology and Rescue "CEDAR"

List of Rescued Documents:
  • Allin, R. W. (196?). The case for Biscayne. Unpublished report. University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This report is a justification for the creation of Biscayne National Monument. The major purpose of the monument would be to protect and make available for public use a rare combination of marine life in a tropical setting.
    Full Text: >>

  • Aman, M. R. (1995). A Recent Review of Retroviral Diseases of Fish and Suggestions for Future Research.
    Summary:
    The diseases discussed in this paper will be presented based on the data for retroviral etiology. Diseases that have an established retroviral etiology and those in which C- type viral particles have been found and transmission experiments have been successful, will be presented as: Confirmed or Strong Evidence for Retroviral Etiology. The remaining diseases will be presented as: Suspected Retroviral Etiology.
    Full Text: >>

  • Bartsch, P. (1936 - 1937). An ecological cross-section of the lower part of Florida based largely upon its molluscan fauna. Excerpt from the Report of the COMMITTEE ON PALEOECOLCOY 1936 - 1937, pp. 11 - 25. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    The ecosystems and associated mollusks found from dry areas of the Everglades south and east to Biscayne Bay, Florida Bay, the Florida Keys and the Shelf are described.
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  • Bein, S. J. (1956). Red Tide investigations. 56-26. Progress Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary:
    This document is a progress report of the 1956 investigations of Red Tide outbreaks.
    Full Text: >>

  • Bein, S. J. (1955). Red Tide bacterial studies. ML 9441. Red Tide Project, Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: Cell free extracts of bacterial cultures are capable of killing fish under laboratory conditions. One of those organisms was isolated and is undoubtedly the cause of a "Red Tide" condition found at Whitewater Bay on the southwest tip of Florida. Many dead and dying fish were reported at this occurrence with the characteristic discoloration of water. The second bacterium was isolated from Tampa Bay in April of 1954 and appears to be a strain or closely related species of the original isolate. At least nineteen other pigmented bacteria have been isolated from time to time in areas at which, "Red Tide" has been known to occur. All of these organisms appear to be closely related strains of the original isolate. All of these organisms will give the characteristic "Red Tide" color to the medium in which it is grown. Of the pigmented bacteria tested from these areas all are capable of killing fish rapidly.

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  • Bello, M. J. (1997). Species composition and seasonality of recruitment of penaeoid shrimps at Bear Cut, Biscayne Bay, Florida.
    Summary:Penaeoid shrimps were collected at Bear Cut, a tidal pass between the Atlantic and Biscayne Bay, Florida from January to December 1994. One surface net (0-1 m depth) and one moored subsurface net (1.0-3 m depth) each with 2 mm mesh were set to capture shrimp during the night-time flood tides of the new moon period monthly. These nets sampled from postlarvae (1.2 mm Carapace Length, CL) to subadult (34 mm CL). Species composition was 34.7% were Metapenaeopsis spp., 32.4% Penaeus spp. postlarvae, 8.9% Penaeus spp. juveniles, 19% Penaeus spp. subadult, 4.3% Sicyonia spp., and 1.2%Trachypenaeus constrictus. Five species of Metapenaeopsis were found at Bear Cut (M. martinella, M. goodei, M. hobssi, M. gerardoi, M. smithi ) of which M. martinella and M. hobbsi constitued new records for Florida coast. The genus Penaeus was represented by P. duorarum and P. brasiliensis , ocurred in a proportion of 2:1. Three species of Sicyonia represented by S. typica, S. laevigata, and S. Parri,, were captured. Total catches of juveniles and subadult for the different species were higher during winter months than any other season. Influx of Penaeus spp. postlarvae to Biscayne Bay showed recruitment pulses during the fall in November (135 postlarvae/100 m3). Postlarvae recruited from stages two to five, with an average size of 1.9 mm CL. The highest concentrations of Penaeus spp. postlarvae were found at flood tides and were most abundant in the subsurface net. Postlarvae of Metapenaeopsis spp., Sicyonia spp. and Trachypenaeus constrictus were not captured at this tidal pass. Juveniles of Penaeus spp. and subadult P. duorarum and P. brasiliensis were most abundant at ebb/flow on the surface net. The average carapace length for P. duorarum males was 16.7 mm and 13.2 mm for females. For P. brasiliensis a greater average carapace length was found, 18. 5 mm for males and 17 mm for females . Predominant size class frequency of CL for Penaeus spp. juveniles was 10 mm. For P. duorarum subadult were 10 and 15 mm, and for P. brasiliensis were 15.2 and 25 mm. M. goodei range from 2 mm CL to 12 mm CL and M. martinella from 2.7 mm CL to 13.7 mm CL. Environmental conditionsincluding rainfall, salinity, water temperature and winds were analyzed. No strong relation was found between these factors and migration movements in or out of Biscayne Bay, except for a postlarvae recruitment pulse and a consistent wind pattern in November.
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  • Berberian, G. A., and A. Y. Cantillo (1999). Oceanographic Conditions in the Gulf of Mexico and Straits of Florida: Fall 1976. NOAA Data Report OAR AOML-36. NOAA/AOML, Miami, FL. 64 pp.
    Summary: Physical and chemical data of the water column were collected as part of the OTEC Project in the Gulf of Mexico and the Straits of Florida. The oceanographic conditions, and nutrients and trace metal levels in seawater during September and October 1976. The primary objectives of the study were: (1) to define the circulation pattern and to determine the pathways of water transfer from the eastern to western Gulf and visa versa; (2) to determine the distribution and concentration of nutrients, trace metals, dissolved oxygen and salinity in these areas; and (3) to obtain data suitable for input into a numerical model of the Gulf of Mexico.
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  • Berkeley, S. A. (1983). Fisheries Assessment in Biscayne Bay .
    Summary: Creel and trawl surveys of Biscayne Bay were carried out in 1982 - 1983 to assess commercial fish and macro-invertebrate habitats and fisheries. Dredged and/or barren bottom was dramatically less productive than seagrass, algae or hard bottom areas. Low fish abundance and diversity in north Biscayne Bay appeared to be correlated with high turbidity and low seagrass abundance. Substantive increases in fish and crustacean productivity in north Biscayne Bay will occur only if seagrass communities can be re-established. Deeper dredged areas in North Bay will not likely become recolonized with seagrass even if turbidity levels are reduced. Hard bottom areas in South Bay are associated with high diversity of fish fauna and serve as nursery areas for several highly desirable species (e.g. hogfish, yellowtail snapper, lane snapper). The area between Julia Tuttle and 79th Street Causeways, which had very dense seagrass abundance, was the richest area on either North or South Biscayne Bay for juvenile fish and shrimp. This basin can serve as a model for the potential of the remainder of North Bay.
    Full Text: >>
    BerkelyI, BerkelyII, Berkely III

  • Bohnsack, J. A., A. Y. Cantillo, and M. J. Bello (Eds.) (2002). Resource Survey of Looe Key National Marine Sanctuary 1983
    Summary: Looe Key National Marine Sanctuary ( LKNMS) was designated in 1981 to protect and promote the study, teaching, and wise use of the resources of Looe Key Sanctuary. A quantitative resource inventory was funded in 1983 by NOAA in cooperation with the University of Miami, the United States Geological Survey, and the Florida Department of Natural Resources. The objective of the study was to quantitatively inventory selected resources of LKNMS in order to allow future monitoring of changes in the Sanctuary as a result of human or natural processes. This study, referred to as Phase I, gives a brief summary of past and present uses of the Sanctuary; and describes general habitat types, geology and sediment distribution, coral abundance and distribution, the growth history of the coral Montastraea annularis, reef fish abundance and distribution, and status of selected resources. An interpretation of the results of the survey are provided for management consideration. The results are expected to provide fundamental information for applied management, natural history interpretation, and scientific research.
    Full Text: >>
    Introduction and uses, Habitat, Sediment, Montastraea annularis growth and Sanctuary survey, Fish survey part I, Fish survey part II, Status of corals resources and Management, Taxonomy, Complete document (41.2 MB)

  • Bowen, O. E. (1998). Analysis of Scientific Programs and Management Plans Affecting Nutrient
    Loading and Algal Blooms in Florida Bay.
    Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary:
    Florida Bay is a 2200 km2 shallow coastal lagoon lying between the southern tip of mainland Florida and the Florida Keys. It is under the management of the National Park Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Changes in Florida Bay, particularly nutrient loading and nuisance algal blooms, have led to the creation of the Florida Bay Scientific Review Panel. This Panel is charged with submitting reports to the Interagency Working Group on Florida Bay. Research among several agencies is coordinated by the Interagency Program Management Committee (PMC). This Committee created the Florida Bay Strategic Plan, which charts progress made.Although there is no standardization in reporting, findings are presented at different workshops and conferences (e.g., the Florida Bay Science Conference) and are written into the NOAA Implementation Plan. This Plan is used to guide future research and funding levels. In order to better advise the PMC, the Florida Bay Science Oversight Panel evaluates ongoing projects and makes further recommendations for future research. Due to the level of interaction among so many agencies, coordination has been difficult, and therefore comprehensive recommendations for future research have been limited.
    Full Text: >>

  • Brand, L. Date?. Assessment of Plankton Resources and Their Environmental Interactions in Biscayne Bay, Florida.
    Summary: Plankton resources of the bay were assessed at 24 stations distributed throughou, covering the entire range of environmental conditions found in Biscayne Bay
    .
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  • Caballero, R. (1999). Preliminary Report on the Recruitment of Penaeid Shrimp Postlarvae in Florida Bay.
    Summary: Penaeid shrimp postlarvae were collected in two tidal channels in the FloridaKeys,Whale Harbor Channel and Long Key Channel,from July 1997 to October 1998 as part of the ongoing NOAA-Florida Bay Recruitment Project. Two channel nets (1 mm and 2 mm) per sample site were used for the collection of pink shrimp postlarvae for three consecutive days in each new moon period .The nets were suspended about 0.5 m below the water surface .Nets were deployed late in the afternoon and retrieved early the next morning .Twenty postlarvae were selected at random from each sample for measurement. The number of spines in the rostrum for all postlarvae was counted. Farfantepenaeus spp.postlarvae were found all year round in Whale Harbor, with higher abundance between May and September,and a peak in July (39.47 postlarvae /1,000 m3).In Long Key postlarvae were caught from May to October with a peak in August (36.5 postlarvae/1,000 m3).
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  • Campos W. L and S. A. Berkeley. (1986). Impact of the Commercial Fishery on the Population of Bait Shrimp (Penaeus spp.) in Biscayne Bay. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS CCMA 164. University of Miami RSMAS TR 2003-02
    Summary: Monthly population size of bait shrimp in the Bay was estimated from December 1984 to July 1985. Growth rates for male and female P. duorarum showed that pink shrimp exhibit a mean residence time in the nursery area (Biscayne Bay) of approximately 21 weeks. Monthly mortality rates were determined for each sex of pink shrimp. It was estimated that 23% and 26% of the male and female monthly population size, respectively, was absorbed by both the fishery and ecosystem monthly. Monthly proportion of the standing stock expected to die exclusively through fishing was 6.5% and 6.0% for males and females respectively. Estimates of emigration rates showed that approximately 4.0% of the population was lost from the Bay system each month. This surplus production was about 50% of the average monthly catch by the fleet. Fishing mortality represents only 8 - 9% of the losses to the shrimp population. The biggest source of loss is emigration, suggesting that most shrimp beyond the size at recruitment (to the fishery) are not utilized for food while in the Bay. Thus, it appears that the direct impact of the fishery on the bait shrimp population is relatively small.
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  • Cantillo A. Y., and G. A. Berberian (1997). MESA New York Bight Project water column chemistry data, cruises #6-12 of the NOAA Ship FERREL. NOAA tech. memo. ERL AOML-92. NOAA/AOML, Miami, FL. 62 pp.
    Summary: During the period April - November 1974, seven oceanographic cruises, denoted WCC 6-12, were conducted by NOAA Ship FERREL to obtain samples of sea water and suspended particulates from the New York Bight Apex for chemical analyses This report presents the chemical data obtained from these samples.
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  • Cantillo A. Y., Hale, K., Collins, E., Pikula, L., & Caballero, R. (2000). Biscayne Bay: environmental
    history and annotated bibliography. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS CCMA 145.
    Summary: An annotated collection of publications that correspond with environmental studies of Biscayne Bay, Florida.
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  • Cantillo A. Y.; E. Collins , and E. Clark (Eds.) (2001). Charles M. Breder Jr.: Dry Tortugas 1929.
    Summary:
    During the summer of 1929, Dr. Charles M. Breder, Jr., employed at that time by the New York Aquarium and American Museum of Natural History, visited the Carnegie Laboratory in the Dry Tortugas to study the development and habits of flying fishes and their allies. The diary of the trip was donated to the Mote Marine Laboratory Library by his family. Dr. Breder's meticulous handwritten account gives us the opportunity to see the simple yet great details of his observations and field experiments. His notes reveal the findings and thoughts of one of the world's greatest ichthyologists. The diary was transcribed as part of the Coastal Estuarine Data/Document Rescue and Archeology effort for South Florida
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  • Cantillo A. Y.; E. Collins , and E. D. Estevez (Eds.) (2002). Charles M. Breder, Jr.:Palmetto Key, 1942.
    Summary: Charles M. Breder and his wife Ethel spent part of the summer of 1942 at the Palmetto Key field station, known today as Cabbage Key, on the west coast of Florida south of Charlotte Harbor. The Palmetto Key field station began in 1938 and ended in 1942 because of World War II. His Palmetto Key diary ran for 95 pages of notes, tables, diagrams, drawings, lists, and business records and this report presents a variety of fascinating entries. Diaries from other years all bear Breder's style of discipline, curiosity, humor, and speculations on nature. The diary was transcribed as part of the Coastal Estuarine Data/Document Rescue and Archeology effort for South Florida.
    Full Text: >> Breder Palmetto | Diary

  • Cantillo A. Y.; E. Collins , and S. Stover (Eds.) (2002). Charles M. Breder: Hypothetical Considerations, 1931 - 1937
    Summary:
    Charles M. Breder Jr. "hypothesis" diary is a deviation from the field diaries that form part of the Breder collection housed at the Arthur Vining Davis Library, Mote Marine Laboratory. There are no notes or observations from specific scientific expeditions in the document. Instead, the contents provide an insight into the early meticulous scientific thoughts of this biologist, and how he examines and develops these ideas. It is apparent that among Dr. Breder's passions was his continual search for knowledge about questions that still besieged many scientists . Topics discussed include symmetry, origin of the atmosphere, origin of life, mechanical analogies of organisms, aquaria as an organism, astrobiology, entropy, evolution of species, and other topics. The diary was transcribed as part of the Coastal Estuarine Data/Document Rescue and Archeology effort for South Florida.
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  • Cantillo A. Y.; E. Collins , S. Stover, and K. Hale (Eds.) (2003). Charles M. Breder, Jr.: Bahamas and Florida
    Summary:Dr. Charles M. Breder, a well known ichthyologist, kept meticulous field diaries throughout his career. This publication is a transcription of field notes recorded during the Bacon-Miner Andros Expeditions, and trips to Florida, Ohio and Illinois during the 1930s. Breder's work in Andros included exploration of a "blue hole", inland ecosystems, and collection of marine and terrestrial specimens. Annecdotes include descriptions camping on the beach, the "filly-mingoes" (flamingos) of Andros Island, the Marine Studios of Jacksonville, FL, a trip to Havana, and the birth of seahorses. This publication is part of a series of transcriptions of Dr. Breder's diaries.
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  • Cantillo A. Y. and S. M. Stover (Eds) (2004). Charles M. Breder Jr.: Drawings
    Summary:
    Among the papers of Dr. Charles M. Breder bequeathed to the Mote Marine Laboratory
    by the Breder family are a series of drawings of larval fish and eggs done from 1917through 1929. The drawings were made with pencil on half and full sheets of buffcolored paper. The half sheet drawings are of larval fish, most of which are not identified. The full sheet drawings often contain comments and notes related to laboratory work on fish egg development, and made during the summer of 1929 when Breder was working in the Dry Tortugas
    .
    Full Text >> Bredeer, Drawings I, Drawings II, Drawings III, Small Drawings I, Small Drawings II, Small Drawings III, Small Drawings IV, Small Drawings V


  • Cantillo A. Y.; E. Collins , S. Stover, and K. Hale (Eds.) (2004). Charles M. Breder, Jr.: Key West, 1928
    Summary: Ch arles Breder, Jr. kept a detailed account of his excursion to Key West to collect tropical fish specimens for the New York Aquarium in 1928. Breder's observations includes data on flying fish, fish species around Key West (relative abundance, sizes and colors of individuals, sizes of schools, stomach contents, and an occasional opinion of how they tasted), weather, development and testing of equipment, contamination of the Key West Harbor, and daily life in the town. Also included in this diary, but not transcribed, are accounts of work in North Carolina, Interstate Park, and Lakehurst.

    Full Text >> Introduction, Diary

  • Cantillo A. Y.; E. Collins , K. M. Leber and, S. Stover (Eds.) (2004). Charles M. Breder, Jr.: Atlantis, 1934
    Summary: Dr. Charles M. Breder participated on the 1934 expedition of the Atlantis from Woods Hole, Massachusetts to Panama and back and kept a field diary of daily activities. The Atlantis expedition of 1934, led by Prof. A. E. Parr, was a milestone in the history of scientific discovery in the Sargasso Sea and the West Indies. Although naturalists had visited the Sargasso Sea for many years, the Atlantis voyage was the first attempt to investigate in detailed quantitative manner biological problems about this varying, intermittent ‘false’ bottom of living, floating plants and associated fauna. In addition to Dr. Breder, the party also consisted of Dr. Alexander Forbes, Harvard University and Trustee of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI); T. S. Greenwood, WHOI hydrographer; M. D. Burkenroad, Yale University’s Bingham Laboratory, carcinology and Sargasso epizoa; M. Bishop, Peabody Museum of Natural History, Zoology Dept., collections and preparations and H. Sears, WHOI ichthyologist. The itinerary included the following waypoints: Woods Hole, the Bermudas, Turks Islands, Kingston, Colon, along the Mosquito Bank off of Nicaragua, off the north coast of Jamaica, along the south coast of Cuba, Bartlett Deep, to off the Isle of Pines, through the Yucatan Channel, off Havana, off Key West, to Miami, to New York City, and then the return to Woods Hole. During the expedition, Breder collected rare and little-known flying fish species and developed a method for hatching and growing flying fish larvae.
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  • Cantillo, A.Y., & Lauenstein, G.G. (2004). Extent and toxicity of contaminated marine sediments in Southeastern Florida. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS-NCCOS 4.
    Summary:
    Thirty sites were sampled in southern Biscayne Bay and Manatee Bay in December 1999 to determine the extent of toxicity in sediments. Analyses and assays included: pesticides and phenols in seawater; chemical contaminants in sediment; amphipod mortality, HRGS P450, sea urchin sperm fertilization and embryology, MicrotoxTM, MutatoxTM, grass shrimp AChE and juvenile clam mortality assays; sea urchin sperm, amphipod and oyster DNA damage; and benthic community assessment. Sediment sites near the mouth of canals showed evidence of contamination. Contaminant plumes and associated toxicity do not appear to extend seaward of the mouth of the canals in an appreciable manner. Concentrations of contaminants in the sediments in open areas of Biscayne and Manatee Bays are generally low.
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  • Cohen, I. J. (1953). Summary of Florida commercial marine fish landings for 1952. 53-12. ML 5757. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami FL.
    Summary: This is the third summary of commercial marine fish landings in Florida.
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  • Cohen , K. A. (1999). Efforts to Create a Sustainable Environment within the Florida Keys; Requirements for the Future. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary:
    The natural environment of South Florida has been affected by many anthropogenic disturbances, such as nutrient enrichment, soil erosion, pesticide contamination, and algal blooms. Efforts to divert freshwater resources to sustain the more populated areas have had devastating effects on the state's wetland areas. Coastal and benthic ecosystems have also been subject to many stressors as a result of runoff and groundwater contamination. Legislators have begun to consider the impact of ecosystem destruction not only ecologically but economically and have responded with increased funding and protective legislation designed to preserve the area. In the last decade, several baseline studies and long-term monitoring projects have been conducted to ensure that conservation and restoration projects are patterned specifically to the needs of the South Florida ecosystem. The Florida Keys have been designated as an area in need of protection and, as such, has been the subject of many of these research/conservation projects. My internship consisted required that I participate in one such project designed to characterize the sedimentation and nutrient patterns within the Florida Keys reef tract. Modelers will then use this data as one parameter which will can combined with concurrent biological, physical, and chemical data for an accurate estimation of system health.
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  • Corcoran E. F. (1983?) Report on the analyses of five (5) Biscayne Bay sediments. Unpublished manuscript. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: Five sediment samples collected in Biscayne Bay were analyzed for hydrocarbons, pesticides and trace metals.

    Full Text: >>

  • Corcoran E. F., M. S. Brown, and A. D. Freay (1984). The study of trace metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls and phthalic acid esters in sediments of Biscayne Bay. In-house report. Prepared for Metropolitan Dade County Environmental Resources Management. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    The purpose of this study was to establish baseline data regarding levels of synthetic organic materials and trace metals in Biscayne Bay sediments. The sediments analyzed were collected as part of the study described in Corcoran et al. (1983). In general, highest levels of the organic compounds and metals analyzed were found in the northern Bay.
    Full Text: >>

  • Corcoran, E.F., Brown, M.S., Baddour, F.R., Chasens, S.A., & Freay, A.D. (1983). 1983 Biscayne Bay
    hydrocarbon study. history and annotated bibliography. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 9.
    Summary: A two year, comprehensive, quantitative investigation was conducted to analyze and identify the spatial distribution of petrogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons in sediments, surface waters, fish and shellfish of Biscayne Bay, Florida.
    Full Text: >>

  • Dann R., and M. Kronengold (1964). Ambient noise measurements at Bimini. ML 64357. B8839. Technical report bubmitted to Bureau of Ships (Code 1622B). Dept. of the Navy. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami,
    Summary: Long term investigation of undersea ambient noise is in progress near Bimini, Bahamas. One of the major problems encountered in this investigation has been in the aspects of ocean engineering, i.e., the establishment of buoys and environmental sensors which are capable of continuous service. Design and construction of sensors and equipment have been necessitated by the lack of commercially available units. Preliminary analysis of the characteristics of sound pressure spectrum levels were obtained by autocorrelation and by analysis of variance calculations. The autocorrelation analysis indicated possible periodicities in the noise at 25 cps and 16 cps. Analysis of variance of limited data showed that above 200 cps the highest percenta of variability was associated with weeks (or months) and the variability of levels between 40s were equally divided between hours and minutes. Mathematical relationships were derived for the statistics between a forceit area measure of pressure and a dB measure of pressure.
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  • Davis, A. G. (1998). Recollections of Environmental Change in the Ten Thousand Islands, Florida Bay and the Everglades: The Oral History and Social Issues of User Groups in Southwest Florida and the Everglades. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary: Several trips to the Ten Thousand Islands were made to gather this collection of oral histories. Most interviewees reside in Everglades City, Marco Island and Goodland. The interviewing was a one to one discussion about life and work histories. I asked open-ended questions regarding environmental observations and social and political impacts on the locals. This material is compiled with historical information to form a broad perspective, both environmentally and politically, of southwest Florida. General conclusions indicate that since the turn of the century, radical ecological changes have occurred. Some of the ecological changes in the Everglades and Ten Thousand Island backwaters have taken place within the last ten years.
    Full Text: >>
  • Delgado-Arias, J. (1994). A single antibody enzime-linked inmunoassay for the detection of Florida Red Tide brevetoxins. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary:
    Marine biotoxins cause significant health, managerial, and economic problems. The present situation demands the prompt implementation of the recently conceived management plan which recognizes the absolute need for scientific research to elucidate the intricacies of the toxic agents and the toxins they produce. Most importantly, the need for a quick, reliable, field-worthy, easy to operate means of toxin detection has been emphasized. After reviewing available literature, and practically comparing detection assays, it was concluded that an immunoassay, based on the use of toxin-specific antibodies, provided the greatest benefit. This research modified an existing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in order to expedite reaction times, and to optimize by diminishing the number of steps involved. The modified assay utilizes only one enzyme labeled antibody. The conjugation of this antibody to the indicator enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was achieved at concentrations ranging from 50 to 163 gg/ml. Affinity chromatography purification of the antibody necessary for conjugation, from multi-species anti-serum to brevetoxin specific IgG, were also successfully performed, and can be routinely employed as means of antibody preparation for conjugates and labels much in demand for current biotoxin research. Presently, the single antibody ELISA approach to biotoxin detection suffers from a high cost of implementation. Research continues seeking cost effective means and variations to enhance signal and improve recognition, in order to make this convenient assay a routine monitoring and field tool.
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  • Dugger, A. (1987) . The Relative Sport Value of Various Types of Fishing in the Charter Boat Fishery of the Florida Key. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary: Fishing types and methods are defined in terms actually used in the charter boat fishery. The fishing records of three volunteer Florida Keys charter boat captains were analyzed for trends in Fratio and CPUE by season, month, boat type, target type, and catch type. Sources of uncertainty which might be introduced by not distinguishing target type or tackle type subdivisions in fishing methods, and bay, estuarine or other specialty fishing targets within effort categories are discussed. A number of behavior variables which could affect management Policies are brought out. The decision making process, as performed by Florida Keys captains, is summarized in 2 parts: the decisions regarding daily targeting of effort, and the decisions regarding the disposition of caught fish.
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  • Feinstein A., A. R. Ceurvels, R. F. Hutton, and E. Snoek (1955). Red Tide outbreaks off the Florida West coast. ML 9491. 55-15. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: A compilation of reports of Red Tide on the west coast of Florida from 1844 to January 1955 is given. Also included are two working diagrams of incidence of Red Tide, suggesting that 1) Red Tide occurs more frequently in the months of August through January, 2) the individual Red Tide outbreaks are part of larger outbreaks which seem to move from south to north, and 3) summer outbreaks appear to originate mostly north of Venice, winter and spring outbreaks further south. Further data are required to give complete support to 2). If this is substantiated, it is pointed out that control may be exerted by action in a limited focal area or areas of origin. Otherwise the problem of control may be of the greatest difficulty since it will require action over a much wider area or areas.
    Full Text: >>

  • Finley, J. P. (1884). Report on the character of six hundred tornadoes. Prof. Papers of the Signal Service no. VII. Second edition. Corrected copy. Published by the authority of the Secretary of War. Signal Office, Washington City.
    Summary:
    The tabulated records of tornadoes from 1794 to 1881, as given in the opening pages of this paper, were derived from various sources of information, some of which were more successfully employed than others. The list of tornadoes is arranged chronologically with respect to years only. Other points of comparison are set forth in the text under the head of deductions and also in the accompanying charts. The principal aim of the tabulated record is to show the prominence. of certain characteristics and their striking invariability.
    Full Text: >>

  • Fink, E. P. (1999). High Time for the "Soft" Sciences to Play Hard Ball: Incorporating the Social Sciences into South Florida Ecosystem Restoration. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary: Two and a half years of preparation yielded what was perceived as a highly successful Social Science Symposium with numerous social system recommendation/ project strategies having been produced.
    Full Text: >>

  • Flik, J. M. (1993). Documenting work from May 1992 to August 1992 with the Division of Resource Management at Biscayne National Park. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary: This report is an introduction to Biscayne National Park and its marine affairs. It closely examines BNP's obligations and policies for the protection and stewardship of submerged cultural resources and documents.
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  • Forrester, A L. (1994). An Investigation of Nutrification in the Florida Reef Tract and the Management of Water Quality in the Florida Keys. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary: The first part of my research internship was fulfilled with Dr. Alina Szmant of the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS). We conducted nutrient studies as part of the SEAKEYS (Sustained Ecological Research Related to Management of the Florida Keys Seascape) program. The SEAKEYS program began in 1989 through a grant from the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to the Florida Institute of Oceanography. In the Summer and Fall of 1992, our study was expanded to conduct intensive weekly nutrient sampling throughout the Keys with additional support from The Nature Conservancy (TNC). Our investigation was carried out at Long Key, with the assistance of the Keys Marine Laboratory. Sampling was also conducted simultaneously at Key Largo by the National Undersea Research Center (NURC), and at Looe Key by the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute on Big Pine Key. The goal of this investigation was to provide a short, but intense database on the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus macronutrients and chlorophyll to compare nutrient conditions in different areas of the Florida reef tract. This data will help scientists and resource managers gain insight into the question of whether nutrification of the Florida Reef Tract occurs at present.
    My role in this project was that of research assistant to Dr. Szmant. My responsibilities included field sampling, sample processing, and data analysis, in addition to those duties involved with managing the laboratory. For the second portion of my internship, I was contracted by TNC to prepare the final report of the weekly nutrient sampling project. The following document is a modification of that final report as presented to TNC in April 1994, which includes the findings from this project, as well as a study of the management of water quality in the Florida Keys.
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  • Greer, B. F. (1954). Summary of Florida commercial marine fish landings for 1953. 55-15. ML 7885. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    This is the fourth summary of commercial marine fish landings in Florida. The total catch for 1953 amounted to 206,887,362 pounds and was valued at $31,523,056. This was a decrease from 1952 of nearly 50 million pounds, caused primarily by the drop in menhaden production. Catches of food fish dropped slightly from 1952. Members of the fishing industry attributed this decrease to poor market demands, not to the lack of fish.

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  • Griffin, G. M. (1974). Case history of a typicalL Dredge- fill project in the Northen Florida Keys effects on water clarity, sedimentation rates and biota.
    Summary:
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  • Hoover, H. W. (1969). Results of the Coliform sampling program for Biscayne Bay. Press Conference by H. W. Hoover at the DuPont Plaza Hotel, December 16, 1969. Report includes data provided by Dr. William Fogarty. Hoover Environmental Legal Defense Fund, Miami, FL.
    Summary: The results of the Hoover Environmental Legal Defense Fund's coliform sampling of Biscayne Bay, on December 1969 are discussed. The fecal coliform count at Matheson Hammock wading beach was four times that considered safe for swimming. The highest coliform counts were found at the entrance to the Miami River.
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  • Idyll, C. P. (1968) Economically important marine organisms in Biscayne Bay. Unpublished manuscript. Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    This report describes the economically important marine organisms of Biscayne Bay and include landing statistics.
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  • Idyll, C. P. (1968?). In defense of the Islandia National Monument. Unpublished manuscript. Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This report discusses the advantages of creating a national monument in what is now the Biscayne National Park.
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  • Idyll, C. P., D. C. Tabb, B. Yokel, R. A. Wade, and D. R. Moore (1965). Conservation in Biscayne Bay. Faculty file. Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    This report discusses conservation issues related to Biscayne Bay and contains a description of the Bay ecosystem.
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  • Idyll, C. P., J. B. Higman, and J. B. Siebenaler (1952). Experiments on the holding of fresh shrimp in refrigerated seawater. ML 2738. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    In the present experiment samples of Key West shrimp were held in seawater at approximately 0 C (32 F). The quality of these shrimp compared to samples held in crushed ice was evaluated by a taste panel, on the basis of flavor, odor and the amount of black spot. Iced samples and seawater-held samples scored approximately the same up to ten days of preservation. Samples in seawater scored higher than those in ice from twelve days on. One seawater sample was edible after 24 days. Headed shrimp kept better than those with heads on. Shrimp in the same seawater throughout the experiment kept somewhat better than those on which part of the seawater was changed daily.Black spotting can be completely avoided by holding the shrimp in refrigerated seawater There appears to be an advantage in holding the shrimp as cold as possible, the best sample being that held just above the freezing point of seawater, -1 C.
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  • Idyll, C. P. (1951). Black discoloration in shrimp. ML 1570. Special Services Bulletin No. 4. Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    In April, 1950, the first sample of discolored shrimp was sent to the Marine Laboratory from Key West. These were the pink grooved shrimp, Penaeus duorarum, the only species caught in the area. Other specimens have been received at various times since then. The dark color appears most often at the outer edge of the segments of the abdomen, or "tail," giving the shrimp a striped appearance when discoloration is severe. In unheaded shrimp the gill chambers, legs and other parts of the cephalothorax or "head" are also darkened. Unheaded shrimp tend to show more discoloration than those headed on the grounds. The black discoloration is not a normal pigment. It is usually restricted to the exoskeleton, or shell, and to the membranes connecting the shell segments. Erosion of the exoskeleton is common, and in extreme cases breakdown of the underlying muscle has been observed. The damage is apparently not due to mechanical action. It is possible that the color is due to a breakdown of the blood of the shrimp. Freshly caught shrimp rarely, if ever, exhibit the discoloration. It is only after holding, in ice or frozen, that the black color appears on the shrimp.
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  • Ingle, R. M. (1954). Irritant Gases Associated with Red Tide. Special Services Bull. No. 9 to the Red Tide Project, Florida State Board of Conservation. ML 6860. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: Irritant effects to the nose and throat associated with Red Tides are temporary. No after-effects have been reported. Irritant effects are present only when Red Tide occurs and even then do not appear unless wind-related waves with associated water vapor and droplets exist. Irritant gas does not usually go far inland beyond the beaches. There is not evidence that the irritating effects are caused by a military gas or any other man-made product.

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  • Iversen, E. S., and G. L. Beardsley (1974). Impact of sand dredging on the fauna of a submerged bar south of Key Biscayne, Florida. Unpublished manuscript. Report to the Des Rocher Sand Co., Inc. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    This study examined the site of a dredging operation south of Cape Florida and evaluated the impact on the biota.
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  • Iversen, E. S. (1969). Preliminary description of the biological zones of Card Sound, lower Biscayne Bay, Florida. Preliminary report to Florida Power and Light Company. Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    This citation is a preliminary study of the ecology of Card Sound based on diving observations and aerial photographs. Based on the estimates of number of species present and abundance of individuals, Card Sound appeared to be an area of relatively low productivity compared to other Florida ecosystems. Five major ecological zones were identified and described.

  • Iversen E. S., and M. A. Roessler (1969). Survey of the biota of Card Sound. Report to the Florida Power and Light Company. Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:
    This citation is a preliminary study of the ecology of Card Sound based on diving observations and aerial photographs. Based on the estimates of number of species present and abundance of individuals, Card Sound appeared to be an area of relatively low productivity compared to other Florida ecosystems. Five major ecological zones were identified and described.
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  • Jacobsen, T., & Browder, J.A. (1987). The ecological basis of fishery yield of the Puerto Rico- Virgin Islands insular shelf. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS-NCCOS 26.
    Summary:
    A literature review was conducted to locate information on the flow of energy from primary producers to the fishery stocks of the Puerto Rican-Virgin Islands insular shelf. This report uses site-specific information to describe the major ecological subsystems, or habitats, of the region, to identify the more common species and the subsystems in which they occur, to quantify productivity and biomass, and to outline trophic relationships. Discussions on each topic and subsystem vary in substance and detail, being limited by the availability and accessibility of information. Seven distinct subsystems are described: mangrove estuary, seagrass bed, coral reef, algal plain, sand/mud bottom, shelf break, and overlying pelagic. Over 50 tables provide lists of species found in each habitat on various surveys dating back to 1956. Estimates of density, relative abundance, and productivity are provided when possible.
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  • Jang, Dosoo (1995). Policy, Liability, and Management Assessment of the Three Most Active Counties' (Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach) Artificial Reef Programs Under National and State Guidance.
    Summary:
    Despite the national and states' eagerness to support artificial reef development, local governments lack scientific, systematic, and practical information regarding artificial reef construction. Especially, due to the shortage of funds for research and monitoring, political expediency for attracting tourist divers and fishermen, disposal of "materials of opportunity," many of the artificial reefs sunk in the United States have been haphazardly procured. In this review, four future priorities are recommended to help solve proper contemporary reef management issues. First, a master plan for each specific-site-reef project must be developed to be anticipated how it could be now and in the future. Second, a more centralized artificial reef development system is needed to achieve the state-wide reef objectives of control and regulation. Third, a reef complex generated by accumulation of reef groups are encoureged because it provides more independent ecological functions than an individual reef. Finally, establishment of local or regional artificial reef advisory committees are strongly recommended to provide input and expertise by their members.
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  • Judge, R. M., and F. W. Curtis (1977). Heavy metal accumulation in mid-Biscayne Bay, Dade County, Florida. Report. June 7, 1977. Grant number 1E-5642 from the FAU-FIU Joint Center for Environmental and Urban Problems. Florida International University, Miami, FL.
    Summary: Sediment samples were collected in Biscayne Bay and analyzed for Cd, Pb, Hg and Zn. These conclusions were drawn: 1) the heavy metal concentration for Cd, Pb, Hg and Zn in the north and south study areas are the same; 2) Fisher Island appears slightly lower in the concentrations of these heavy metals; 3) the area south of the mouth of the Miami River and north of the Rickenbacker Causeway may be a trap for heavy metals; and, 4) south bay areas may be as high in the studied metals as north bay areas.
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  • Lutz, S. (1998). An assessment of unreported boat grounding damage to shallow-water corals in the Florida Keys. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary:
    The serious physical damage to corals from the occasional large ship grounding is a highly visible and major impact to coral reefs in the Florida Keys. However, smaller vessels continuously damage corals. Unreported damage caused by small vessels that are able to leave a grounding incident under their own power is underestimated. In this study 315 shallow-water massive coral colonies from 49 reef sites within the northern Florida reef tract were examined for signs of boat grounding damage (propeller scars and boat hull scrapes). Boat grounding damage was found throughout the range but it appears that the extent of damage is not currently a threat to the overall health of corals in the northern Florida reef tract. However, shallow-water massive corals in two much-visited reef areas did show high signs of impact. If visits by small vessels continue to expand, the associated damage to localized reef areas could become serious.
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  • McFadden, K. J. (1998). An internship with the village of Key Biscayne: Working with Environmental Issues of Beach Nourishment and Invasive Exotic Plant Removal. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami. 370 pgs.
    Summary: This report includes beach surveys, involvement with the village's Beach Resources and Management Task Force, and development of a plan for the removal of invasive exotic species

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  • McKinley, E. (1995). Temporal and spatial variability in the abundance of Penaeid shrimp in Biscayne Bay: Environmental and anthropogenic influences. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary:The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal and spatial variability in the distribution of Penaeid shrimp in Biscayne Bay and to correlate abundance and distribution with environmental factors including water quality (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen), vegetation quantity and quality, canal discharge, and rainfall. The data set is unique because samples were collected over a 14 month period covering both wet and dry seasons. Also, the entire length of the bay was sampled, rather than only the southern basin, used by the commercial fishery and which has been studied previously.
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  • McNulty, J. K. (1957). Pollution studies in Biscayne Bay during 1956. 57-8 Progress Report, February, 1957. Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health grant RG3). ML 15711. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: A method for the Warburg BOD analysis of sediments is described. Preliminary analysis of the 3OD data shows: maxima in areas of highest pollution; minima in areas isolated by hydrography from pollution centers, with the important exceptions that low values occurred an shallow bars in highly polluted areas where current velocities are high; and intermediate values indicating that substantial organic deposition has occurred in central parts of the bay where currents are weakest. Data on specific gravity, moisture content, appearance and particle size distributions were obtained. Values below 1.30 occurred under two conditions: (a) at scattered points, usually in natural settings adjacent to the Miami shoreline; and (b) in a midbay area between and adjacent to the MacArthur and Venetian Causeways. The data show that these areas constitute zones of degradation due to the combined effects of dredging, island building and pollution. Abundance of bottom plants and macroinvertebrates indicate: (a) sharply limited abundance of algae within formerly heavily polluted areas adjacent to the Miami shoreline and in the midbay degradation area, plus comparatively great abundance of phanerogams in a north midbay area which received comparatively large amounts of organic materials; (b) minimal abundance of macroinvertebrates in degradation zones adjacent to the Miami shoreline and in a midbay degradation area, plus maximal abundance adjacent to the most polluted parts of the bay where water movement is rapid. Results of biofouling studies indicated an: association of tube-building amphipods with the most highly polluted parts of the bay; (b) association of green and bluealgae with cleaner waters of the bay; and (c) association of barnacles with neither polluted nor clean waters selectively.
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  • MacVicar, P. and T. VanLent (1984). Evaluation Report. A Thirty Day Field Experiment of Water Deliveries to Northeast Shark River Slough April-May, 1984.
    Summary: From April 19th through May 18,1984 the South Florida Water Management District (District) conducted a 30 day field test to introduce surface waterflow into Northeast Shark River Slough (NESRS) via the S-333 spillway.The test included an extensive data collection effort both in the slough and in the residential and agricultural areas adjacent to the L-31 N levee. Weather conditions were very dry prior to and during the test,allowing a very large discharge (on the order of 61,000 acre feet) to be put into the slough during the 30 days. The water passed into the slough where it was held in surface storage,as indicated by the rise in the water level at the slough recording stations. A large percentage was probably lost due to evapotranspiration and a small amount seeped into the Biscayne aquifer and began to slowly move east. There was no measurable increase in the water table outside of NESRS related to the opening of S-333.Water levels in the northern portion of Everglades National Park and in the south end of Water Conservation Area 3A fell during the test as a result of the S-333 operation. The L-31 N canal system was shown to have a very large area of influence west of the levee,exerting the dominant man-made influence on water conditions in the residential and agricultural areas of the East Everglades north of C-111.
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  • Meyers, D. (1970). A synoptic calibration of electrical potential difference for transport measurements in Bear Cut.
    Summary: A calibration of electrical potential difference was undertaken in order to examine the relationship of the electrical potential to the actual transport in Bear Cut. This was accomplished by taking current measurements over a full tidal cycle. The calculated transport and the measured potential were compared with the theoretical relation between transport and potential. The calibration of electrical potential in Bear Cut showed that variations in tidal height, a shift in the flow axis over an asymmetric bottom contour, and the presence of a rather large potential gradient resulted in an unclear picture of transport.
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  • Michel, J. F. (1968). A study of tidal transport and diffusion in Bear Cut, Dade County, Florida. Report to Department of the Army, Jacksonville District, Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, FL. Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This study was designed to determine the disposition of suspended solids resulting from the deposition of hydraulic fill along the shore of Virginia Key. This fill was to be used in the proposed beach nourishment program undertaken by the Corps of Engineers. Attention wa paid to the effect on salt water intakes at the NOAA and University of Miami facilities. It was indicated that heavy concentrations of suspended material at these intakes might result in the death of many scientific valuable specimens.
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  • Moore, H. B. (1970). Miami sea temperatures and salinities. Technical report 70038. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This report contains salinities and water temperatures in Biscayne Bay.
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  • Moore, H. B. (1967). Miami sea temperatures. Technical report ML 67269. Institute of Marine Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This report containes tables of sea temperatures in Biscayne Bay.
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  • Moore, H. B. (1962). Behaviour of plankton in relation to hydrographic factors. Final report. Contract Nonr. 840 (12) NIR 104iology Branch, Office of Naval Research, U. S. Department of the Navy. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: The propagation of sound in the sea is significantly affected by planktonic and nectonic organisms; this is particularly marked in the case of the deep scattering layer. This is a report of preliminary work on the vertical distribution of the copepods under natural conditions in the sea, the environmental conditions associated with the distribution, and analysis using statistical methods. Plankton collections made at different times were available from the National Geographic Society, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research providing full 24et sampling on about twelve occasions at a number of stations between Miami and Bimini. Not all species were present in sufficient numbers on all occasions to allow the full series of stations to be employed in the statistical analysis.
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  • Moore, H. B., I. Hela, E. S. Reynolds, J. K. McNulty, S. Miller, C. A. Carpenter (1955). Report on preliminary studies of pollution in Biscayne Bay. Report to the Federal Security Agency, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health under Grant E-510
    Summary: This report contains a description of the Biscayne Bay ecosystem and chapters on water exchange, chemical, bacteriological and macroorganism studies.
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  • Moore H. B., and D. M. Moore (1950). Key to the common gastropods of the Miami area. Technical report ML 06940. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL. 14 pp.
    Summary: This report is a key to common gastropods found in Biscayne Bay.
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  • Murdock, J. F. (1954). A preliminary survey of the effects of releasing water from Lake Okeechobee through the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee estuaries. ML 7745. 54-14, Final Report, Contract No. DA-08-123-ENG-1376, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, June, 1954. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: The results and conclusions here reported are based upon a preliminary survey of the periodic release of water from Lake Okeechobee through the Caloosahatchee River and the St. Lucie Canal and its effects upon the marine life of the estuaries. Stations are listed and observations presented, with notes on conditions encountered. Anecdotal evidence is included which notes some of the complaints lodged by people in these areas. The release of lake water westward through the Caloosahatchee River and eastward discharge through the St. Lucie Canal are discussed.
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  • Norton, Grady (1948). Some Notes of Forecasting Jacksonville District.
    Summary: General weather and temperature forecasting in the South Atlantic States presents many problems not readily solved by the voluminous writings of recent years by meteorologists who have applied the frontal analysis system, isentropic analysis, and various theories and formulas of thermodynamics, etc., in an effort to answer the forecaster prayers for better interpretation and prognostic methods. After some years, we find it just as difficult to forecast a cold wave, a snow storm, a hurricane, or even local thundershowers as before the newer methods came into use. In fact, I believe the evidence is unmistakable that we are not doing as good a job all along the line. The problem has been confused by too much theoretical considerations. For this reason, the following is written in an effort to get back to earth and set down a few practical rules for forecasting in this district based on observed behavior of pressure patterns, with only descriptive reference to air masses, fronts, isentrophy, thermodynamics. In dealing with the Jacksonville District, it soon becomes apparent that the weather situations differ widely from north to south. There is no sharp line of demarcation, but generally we will be compelled to think of Florida in a separate category from Georgia and the Carolinas. Although considerable difference exist in various portions of Georgia and the Carolinas, north to south and west to east, we will not attempt to separate treatment as between these states. Florida will therefore be treated as one unit, while Georgia and the Carolinas will constitute another, for these purposes.
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  • Norton, Grady (1947). Hurricane Forecasting (A Soliloquy)
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  • Patton, G. W., and L. K. Dixon (1981). Water quality sampling and analysis at St. Lucie estuary. Final Report to the South Florida Water Management District. Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, FL.
    Summary: A temporally-intensive sampling and analysis of selected water quality parameters was conducted at four locations in St. Lucie Estuary during the period July 12 through July 17, 1981. The work was performed according to the guidelines and under the direction of the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) to provide baseline data for calibration of a hydrodynamic, simulative model.
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  • Rhian, E., and R. Dann (1960) Surface layer transmission in the Tongue of the Ocean. Technical report. Contract Nonr 840-14. Acoustics Branch, Office of Naval Research. Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: Signals from a series of explosive shots are analyzed in order to determine the effect of the surface channel sound duct in the Tongue of the Ocean. A simple technique is described for determining sound arrivals via this channel. The frequency spectrum of the sound transmitted through the surface channel is in good agreement with that predicted by normal mode theory.
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  • Robins, C. R. (1957). The inshore fish fauna of the Florida Keys. Grant report to the National Science Foundation. Grant Grant No. Ghe Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This is a short report describing preliminary results of a study of fishes of the Florida Keys. This study with similar work in the Bahamas. The fauna of the two regions was found to be quite distinctive. This is a short report describing preliminary results of a study of fishes of the Florida Keys. This study with similar work in the Bahamas. The fauna of the two regions was found to be quite distinctive.
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  • Roessler, M., G. L. Beardsley, and R. Smith (1973). Benthic communities of Biscayne Bay, Florida. Report. University of Miami Sea Grant Program, Miami, FL.
    Summary: The objectives of this report were: (1) to develop and make available a chart identifying the major bottom communities from Card Bank (south Card Sound) to Venetian Causeway (north Biscayne Bay); (2) to briefly discuss their relative biological value; and (3) to recommend which communities could be altered by dredging and filling with least impact on the ecosystem.
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  • Roessler M. A., A. Y. Cantillo and J. García-Gómez (2002). Biodiversity Study of Southern Biscayne Bay and Card Sound 1968 - 1973.
    Summary: A multi-disciplinary investigation was conducted in southern Biscayne Bay and Card Sound from 1968 to 1973. The purpose of the investigation was to conduct an integrated study of the ecology of southern Biscayne Bay with special emphasis on the effects of the heated effluent from the Turkey Point fossil fuel power plant, and to predict the impact of additional effluent from the planned conversion of the plant to nuclear fuel. The results of this investigation have been discussed in numerous publications. This report contains the unpublished biology data that resulted from the investigation.
    Full Text: >> Main Document, APP I Part 1, APP I Part 2, APP II, APP III, APP IV Part 1, APP IV Part 2, Index

  • Schmidt, T. W. (2002). 1979 Ecological study of fishes and the water quality characteristics of Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, Florida. NOAA/National Park Service Joint Publication. NOAA Tech. Mem. NOS NCCOS CCMA 154. NPS Special Report 01-02. NOAA/NOS/NCCOS. 107 pgs.
    Summary: An ecological study conducted in Florida Bay from May 1973 to October 1976 was developed from a need to understand the distribution of Florida Bay fishes in relation to changing environmental conditions.
  • Full Text: >> Main Document, Photos I, Photos II

  • Schmidt, T. W, Coleman R. A., Hernance R.E., Rose P.W., Patty P.C. and Robertson W.B. Jr. (1977). Some Hydrographic Aspects of the Estuarine Area from Northeastern Florida Bay to BarnesSound, especially in re Restoring Historical Water Connections.
    Summary:
    In as much as this report is somewhat after the fact, we have elected to treat all the information we could find on the hidrography of the area, past and present, rather than limiting comment to the question of connections across U.S. Route 1. In this way, we hope at least to provide a firm point of departure for the next Everglades NP biologist or hydrologist who may have this matter to consider.

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  • Schroeder, P. B. (2003) Benthic Sampling Program in Biscayne Bay 1981-1982 . A. Y. Cantillo (2003 ed.). NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS CCMA 164. NOAA/NOS/NCCOS, Silver Spring, MD.485 pp.
    Summary: The Biscayne Bay Benthic Sampling Program was divided into two phases. In Phase I, sixty sampling stations were established in Biscayne Bay (including Dumfoundling Bay and Card Sound). The stations were visited in the wet season (late fall of 1981) and in the dry season (midwinterof 1982). At each station abiotic conditions were measured or estimatedincluding depth, sources of freshwater inflow and pollution, bottom characteristics, current direction and speed, surface and bottom temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, and water clarity. Seagrass blades and macroalgae were counted. Underwater 35-mm photographs were made of the bottom using flash apparatus. Benthic samples were collected using a petite Ponar dredge, washed, fixed in formalin, and later sorted and identified to a pre-agreed taxonomic level. During the wet season sampling period, a nonquantitative one-meter wide trawl was made of the epibenthic community. These samples were washed, fixed, sorted and identified. During the dry season sampling period, sediment cores were collected at each station not located on bare rock and analyzed for sediment size and organic composition. In Phase II of the program, fifteen stations were selected from among the sixty of Phase I and sampled quarterly. In Phase II, polychaete specimens collected for analysis to the species level.
    Full Text: >> Main Document
    , Appendices

  • Seba, D. B. (1969). Some occurrences of pesticides in the marine environment. Report. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: The purpose of this work was to explore the occurrence of organochlorine pesticides. Samples of airborne dust collected in Barbados, hurricane and trade winds rainwater, and Biscayne Bay and Florida Current surface slicks were analyzed for dieldrin, 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDE and 2,4'-DDT.
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  • Shinn, E. A., and E. F. Corcoran (1987). Contamination by landfill leachate, South Biscayne Bay, Florida. Unpublished report. Miami, FL.
    Summary: This report describes the results of water sampling in wells drilled at a saniraty landfill near southern Biscayne Bay. Water samples were analyzed for pesticides.
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  • Smith, F. G. W. (1948). Sponge cultivation. Special Services Bulletin No. 3. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: Surveys carried on in the Gulf of Mexico indicate that there is very little possibility of extending the natural sponge fishery in United States waters and that full recovery of the beds is not likely to take place for a considerable time. It is, therefore, strongly urged that sponge cultivation be started, either by government or private enterprise, for the dual purpose of increasing the available supply of sponges and also to make possible an experimental re-seeding of the middle and deep ground of the Gulf sponge fishery. Attempts to start a sponge farming industry are reviewed. Cost estimates for private and government sponge cultivation were presented.
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  • Smith, F. G. W. (1945). Preliminary report on the Florida crawfish investigation. Report. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: During the winter of 1944 the South Florida crawfish or spiny lobster fishery was the subject of a considerable amount of discussion among commercial fishermen, anglers and others, with one faction contending that over-fishing had seriously reduced the natural supply and that stricter regulations should be enacted. A scientific investigation of the fishery in Florida was carried out.
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  • Smith, J. W. T. (1997). Full Cost Accounting:An Economic Evaluation Framework For Decision-Making
    In Everglades Restoration Efforts.
    Summary: Everglades ecosystem restoration will require more than twenty years of commitment and will likely cost several billion dollars. The United States Army Corps of Engineers, a federal agency, and the South Florida Water Management District, a state agency, are the two primary parties responsible for its success. As the two agencies design and construct restoration projects, both attempt to adequately reflect in their decision process the benefits and costs derived from the implementation of their respective policies. However, many environmental and social benefits and costs are overlooked or not adequately addressed in their decision-making processes. Full cost accounting is an economic evaluation approach which attempts to identify, quantify, and, where possible, monetize these overlooked benefits and costs. The implementation of full cost accounting by both these agencies would enhance the amount of information available to them for policy decisions and would likely result in more informed and better quality decisions and policy for Everglades restoration.
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  • Schroeder, P. B. (2003) Benthic Sampling Program in Biscayne Bay 1981-1982 . A. Y. Cantillo (2003 ed.). NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS CCMA 164. NOAA/NOS/NCCOS, Silver Spring, MD.485 pp.
    Summary: The Biscayne Bay Benthic Sampling Program was divided into two phases. In Phase I, sixty sampling stations were established in Biscayne Bay (including Dumfoundling Bay and Card Sound). The stations were visited in the wet season (late fall of 1981) and in the dry season (midwinterof 1982). At each station abiotic conditions were measured or estimatedincluding depth, sources of freshwater inflow and pollution, bottom characteristics, current direction and speed, surface and bottom temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen, and water clarity. Seagrass blades and macroalgae were counted. Underwater 35-mm photographs were made of the bottom using flash apparatus. Benthic samples were collected using a petite Ponar dredge, washed, fixed in formalin, and later sorted and identified to a pre-agreed taxonomic level. During the wet season sampling period, a nonquantitative one-meter wide trawl was made of the epibenthic community. These samples were washed, fixed, sorted and identified. During the dry season sampling period, sediment cores were collected at each station not located on bare rock and analyzed for sediment size and organic composition. In Phase II of the program, fifteen stations were selected from among the sixty of Phase I and sampled quarterly. In Phase II, polychaete specimens collected for analysis to the species level.
    Full Text: >> Main Document
    , Appendices

  • Steinberg J. C. (1961). Studies of Underwater Noise. ML 62163. 8886. Final report to Bell Telephone Laboratories, Purchase Order, D, based on Prime Contract Nobsr 57093, Sonar Branch, Bureau of Ships, U. S. Department of the Navy. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: Several underwater noise pulses believed to be of marine animal origin, have been observed at a number of the U. S. Navy Oceanographic Stations. Based on the observations, a pair of hydrophones were installed off the west coast of Bimini, Bahamas, with the objective of identifying the sound sources. One hydrophone is in water 100 feet deep, at the edge of the Gulf Stream about one NM off shore. The other one is a mile further out in 1200 feet of water. Three types of pulses that have been observed at Bimini, designated as Types 1, 2 and 3 are of interest in this connection. Type 1 sounds are short pulses of approximately single frequency tone in the range from 20 to 30 cps. The pulses occur randomly in time and in this respect, differ from trains of similar pulses observed at Oceanographic Stations. Type 2 sounds are pulse trains of about one minute duration that correspond to trains observed at Oceanographic Stations. Type 3 sounds are somewhat similar to Type 2, but occur irregularly in trains of varying duration. Types 1 and 3 sounds occur at the shallow hydrophone site. With the aid of two additional hydrophones that have been installed and an underwater video camera in process of installation, the probabilities appear to be good, of tracking and identifying the soniferous animals. Type 2 sounds occur at the deep hydrophone site and identifying the animals poses difficult problems. If the animals become active for periods of several days or more, identification may become possible with the aid of a Vare Industries, tethered, underwater video vehicle which is capable of working to depths of 1200 feet.
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  • Stewart, H.B. (1951). Northern Holiday Expedition, 1951. NOAA OAR AOML Special Publication 2004-001.
    Summary:
    Intensive exploration of the seas using modern technology began in the 1950s, when the US Navy funded research to increase knowledge about the oceans. Harris B. Stewart, who eventually became the first director of the NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in Miami, FL, joined the 1951 Northern Holiday Expedition of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography when he arrived at the Institute to attend graduate school. The main goal of the expedition was to survey unexplored sections of nautical charts and perform a complete survey of the Mid-Pacific Mountains. Dr. Stewart's papers were donated to NOAA by his family upon his passing in 2000 including the field diaries written during his career. The field diary written during the Northern Holiday Expedition contains descriptions of day-to-day ship activities including the retrieval of a 100-pound manganese nodule and the charting of the Scripps Seamount..
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  • Stone T. D. (1995). Water Quality and Biological Monitoring of Northeast Florida Bay.
    Summary:
    Due to the construction and operation of Canal C- 111, in association with other canals and canal structures, the natural hydrology of South Dade County, Florida has been considerably altered. This flood control project dramatically reduced the historical sheetwater and groundwater flow from the wetlands of Taylor Slough into northeast Florida Bay. Everglades National Park ( ENP) indicatedthat C- 111had decreased hydraulic gradients and shortened period of flow through Taylor Slough to downstream estuaries contributing to hypersaline conditions, abrupt salinity changes and a general decline in the natural resources of the wetland and coastal areas of northeast and central areas of the Park. Through the request of ENP, an experimental test program wouldbe initiatedbytheSouth FloridaWaterManagementDistrict( SFWMD) to provide a mechanism to field test increased freshwater delivery to the area. As part of the environmental monitoring to be conducted under conditions of the proposed test, the Metro Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management ( DERM), under contract to the SFWMD, began a water quality and biological monitoring project to document any dowstream effects from the changes in water delivery to northeast Florida Bay. This project is the first year in a longterm effort, and DERM's future monitoring techniques will expand on this baseline information. I also include a discussion regarding the approach to future restoration of Florida Bay.
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  • Tabb D. C. , Dubrow D. L. and Manning R. (1959). Hydrographic Data From the Inshore Bays and Estuaries of Everglades National Park Florida, 1957 – 1959.
    Summary:
    During the course of this study, a large amount of hydrographic data was accumulated from the area, which lies at the southern extremity of the Florida penninsula. In response to many requests for information on the hydrography of this relatively unknown area, the accompanying tables of data from selected stations have been prepared.
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  • Tabb D. C. and Dubrow D. L. (1962). Biological Data on pink shrimp "Penaeus dourarum" of North Florida Bay and adjacnt estuaries in Monroe County, Florida, September 1957 - March 1962.
    Summary: A study of the ecology of northern Florida Bay and adjacent estuaries in Everglades National Park, Monroe County, Florida, was conducted during July, 1957 through May, 1962. The results of the studies on shrimp biology have been presented. However, during the course of the study a large amount of field data pertaining to meteorology, tide stage, salinity and temperature of the water at sampling, and comments on shrimp behavior, were collected. We believe that these data plus the data on size and sex would be useful to other workers.
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  • Tabb, D., D. Dubrow, and R. Manning (1959). Hydrographic data from the inshore bays and estuaries of Everglades National Park, Florida, 1957 - 1959s. ML 59253 .8912. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This report contains hydrographic data collected at stations in Whitewater Bay, Cape Sable, Florida Bay and Buttonwood Canal during 1957 - 1959. Salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH were determined.
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  • Tabb, D. C. (1958). Investigation of possible effects on the marine environment of dredging and filling of the Ragged Keys. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: An investigation of the site of a proposed bulkhead and fill project that would consolidate the Ragged Keys in southern Biscayne Bay was carried out. New observations were made and results of past biological surveys of the area compiled.
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  • Thorhaug, A., and J. Garcia-Gomez (1972). Ecological investigations of the macroalgae in Biscayne Bay and Card Sound, Florida. I. Preliminary results of the red algal complex. Unpublished manuscript. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: This is a preliminary report on the Laurencia complex in Biscayne Bay and Card Sound.
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  • Udey, L., Cantillo A., Kandrashoff W. and J. Browder (2002). Results of a fish health survey of north Biscayne Bay: June 1976 - June 1977. NOAA/University of Miami Joint Publication. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS CCMA 157. RSMAS TR 2002-02. NOAA/NOS/NCCOS, Silver Spring, MD. 31 pp.
    Summary:
    Fish were collected weekly in Biscayne Bay using a monofilament gill net set from a small skiff during 20-30 minute intervals. Although weekly sampling took place for 2.5 years, only the data from samples collected from June 1976 to June 1977 were used in this document. Abnormal external conditions of fins and body were observed on each fish and recorded. Fish were returned immediately to their habitats. Fish collected in the time period for this study numbered 3,765 and included 32 species. Of these, 16 species, totaling 3,556 fish, were caught in sufficient numbers (20 or more) to warrant data analysis. Only 3 of the 16 species could be considered relatively unafflicted: Aetobatus narinari (spotted eagle ray), Diodon hystrix (porcupinefish), and Selene vomer (lookdown). More than 80% of the examined specimens of these three species were unaffected. Less than 20% of the specimens of Diapterus plumieri (striped mojarra), Micropogonias undulatus (Atlantic croaker), and Pogonias cromis (black drum) displayed normal conditions. The three most afflicted species were Diapterus plumieri, striped mojarra; Micropogonias undulatus, Atlantic croaker; and Pogonias cromis, black drum. Only 7, 3, and 7% respectively showed no external evidence of disease. Data described in this document were originally tabulated in the mid-1970s, remained unpublished, and are no longer available. This document was based on archived unpublished text, a data summary table, and figures. Most of the text and cited references were the ones used in the original manuscript and no attempt was made to update them.
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  • University of Miami (1962). Ambient noise and sound transmission in tropical waters. ML 62144. 8882. Final report to U. S. Department of the Navy, Bureau of Ships. Contract Nobsr 72626. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: Measurements of ambient noise were carried out in the Tongue of the Ocean during cruises of the R/V GERDA in 1958 and 1959. Data were obtained on the spectrum levels of ambient noise in relation to windspeed, sea state and water depth at various locations. In 1960 and 1961, exploratory studies of the contributions of surface waves to ambient noise were made at the Bimini Hydrophone Installation. In 1959, sound propagation tests in the Tongue of the Ocean employing a series of explosive charges, showed the existence of a surface channel and indicated the possibilities using such tests to determine its properties. Other work under contract included the measurement of noise radiated by the oceanographic vessel USNS GIBBS and the ultrasonic absorption of natural suspensions of calcium carbonate and other substances.
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  • University of Miami (1958). Investigation of possible effects of dredging and filling Elliott and Old Rhodes Key. Report to Florida State Board of Conservation. University of Miami, Marine Laboratory, Miami, FL.
    Summary:Observations were conducted to determine the probable effects of bulkheading and filling bahind the bulkhead, and the probably biological consequences of obtaining fill from the Caesar Creek delta.
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  • University of Miami (1957). Level sea bottom communities. 57-2(?)7. Annual report. Grant No. G-3938. National Science Foundation The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: The purpose of this research is to obtain detailed information about tropical level bottom communities in the Miami area so that a comparison may be made with the much better known communities of temperate waters.
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  • University of Miami (1954). Emergency report on the Florida Red Tide. ML 6438. 54-2. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: This report reviews knowledge on Red Tides and makes recommendations on research needed to prevent outbreaks. Serious Red Tides were noted in1844, 1854, 1878, 1880, 1882, 1863, 1865, 1908, 1916. Outbreaks studied in the field by The Marine Laboratory occurred in 1946, 1947, 1948, 1952, 1953-4.
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  • University of Miami (1954). Fish catch statistics in relation to water release from the St. Lucie canal.
    Summary: A study of commercial fish landing statistics does not indicate any serious reduction in commercial activity due to the discharge of water through the St. Lucie Canal. It is believed, however, that the sports fishing business, insofar as inshore and estuarine species are concerned is quite seriously harmed, although no permanent damage way be done to the fish stocks themselves by the freshwater influx. The effects of sediment cannot be fully appraised without a detailed investigation.
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  • University of Miami (1952). Recapitulation of 1951 fish census. ML 3026. 52-11. Report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: This report lists catch of food, non-food , shellfish, crustaceans, turtles, squid, and sponges (limited data) per Florida county as well as totals.
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  • University of Miami (1952). Study of oceanic ambient noise and scattering layer effects. ML 2784. 52-7. Quaterly contract report number Nobsr-57146. U. S. Navy Department, Bureau of Ships. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: This is a preliminary report of the investigation of oceanic ambient noise in tropical waters for the purpose of supplementing existing cold water ambient sound data affecting underwater sound transmission. The investigation includes the deep scattering layer with the aim of predicting the occurrence and behavior of layers.
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  • University of Miami (1949). Shrimping in Tampa Bay. 49-3. Preliminary report to the Florida State Board of Conservation. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
    Summary: This report discusses the pros and cons of shrimp trawling in Tampa Bay and recommends a change in regulations to permit trawling in the Bay. Effects of trawling on benthic communities is discussed. Field investigations were done by C. Idyll and other staff from the Marine Laboratory.
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  • University of Miami (1948). Recommended program of conservation for Florida marine resources. Report. The Marine Laboratory, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary: Recommendations were made for the restoration and managements of the oyster, sponge, fish and turtle industries.
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  • Vander Linden, K. (1996). The Miami River: Past, Present and Future. Internship Report M. A. Marine Affairs and Policy, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmosphreric Science, University of Miami.
    Summary:This paper records the "ins and outs" of the Miami River to which I was exposed. It describes the past, present, and future of the river. The problems plaguing the river and their potential solutions are explored. Emphasis is also placed upon the individuals and groups involved in river activities. The future awaiting the river is contemplated as different opinions exist as to the projected role of the river. Finally, my role in the river is defined. I was immersed in all that the river is and has to offer, from touring the waterway via a tug boat to attending regulatory meetings to promoting manatee protection and awareness. Full Text: >>

  • Voss, G. L. (2002) An environmental assessment of the John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park and the Key Largo Coral Reef Marine Sanctuary (Unpublished 1983 Report). N. Voss, A. Y. Cantillo and M. J. Bello (2002 eds.). Joint NOAA/UMiami report. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS CCMA 161. NOAA LISD Current References 2002-6. University of Miami RSMAS TR 2002-03. 452 pp.
    Summary:
    The Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park was established in 1960 and the Key Largo National Marine Sanctuary in 1975. Studies were conducted in 1983 to determine the state of the coral reefs and surrounding areas in relation to changing environmental conditions and resource management cover a time span of approximately ten years. Seventeen sites were designated to be studied qualitatively and quantitatively within the Sanctuary and Park. At each site three parallel transects not less than 400 m long were run perpendicular to the reef or shore, each 300 m apart. Observations, data collecting and sampling were done by two teams of divers. Approximately 75 percent of the bottom within the 18- m isobath was covered by marine grasses, predominantly turtle grass. The general health of the seagrasses appeared good. Several other areas showed heavy concentrations of sand mounds probably caused by large populations of a callianasid shrimp. The hardbottom of the Sanctuary and Park includes rubble Sound. The North Channel hardbottom bar at present has only moderate boat traffic over it. Changes have taken place over the last thirty years most obvious of which has been the loss of most of the extensive beds of Sargassum weed, one of the most extensive beds of this alga in the keys. The hardbottom at South Channel and the surrounding grass beds showed signs of stress. This area bears the heaviest boat traffic within the Park waters causing continuous turbidity from boat wakes. The offshore hardbottom and rubble areas in the Sanctuary appeared to be in good health and showed no visible indications of deterioration. Damage by boat groundings and anchors was negligible in the areas surveyed. The outer reefs in general appear to be healthy. Corals have a surprising resiliency to detrimental factors and, when conditions again become favorable, recover quickly from even severe damage. It is, therefore, a cause for concern that by 1983, Grecian Rocks had yet to recover from die- off in 1978. The slow recovery, if it is occurring, may be due to the lower quality of the inshore waters. The patch reefs, more adapted to inshore waters, do not show obvious stress signs, at least those surveyed in this study. It is apparent, however, that water quality is changing in the keys. Water clarity over much of the reef tract today is much reduced from former years and undoubtedly plays an important part in the stresses seen today over the Sanctuary and Park.
    Full Text: >> Main Document, Appendices A-C, Appendix D Assessement of fish communities by Bannerot and Schmale, Appendix E Field Photographs Appendix E, Appendix F Taxonomic information

  • Wakefield, J. W. (1939). Pollution studies in Biscayne Bay. Report. Florida State Board of Health, Bureau of Engineering, Jacksonville, FL.
    Summary: This report describes the results of a sanitary survey of Biscayne Bay. The author concluded that the waters of the Bay wre polluted by discharge of the Miami River and numerous sewer outfalls but that it is contained and does spread far into the Bay.
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  • Wang, J. D., E. Daddio, and M. D. Horwitz (1978). Canal discharges into south Biscayne Bay. Report to the Department of Environmental Resources Management Metropolitan Dade County. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
    Summary:Three major canals discharge into south Biscayne Bay. Dye dispersion studies were carried out to determine the zone of influence of the canal discharges.
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  • Woodburn, K. D. (1962). Proposed dredge and fill area, south Biscayne Bay, Dade County, Florida (SAKSP Permits 62-278). ML 13497. Unpublished report. FSBCML No: 60-17. BL No. 62-10. Florida State Board of Conservation Marine Laboratory Maritime Base, Bayboro Harbor, St. Petersburg, FL.
    Summary: This report describes a proposed dredge and fill plan in the Featherbed Bank area.
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  • Woodburn, K. D. (1960). Spoil disposal recommendations for proposed dredging and fill by Sea-Dade Corporation in lower Biscayne Bay, Dade County, Florida. ML 13528. Unpublished report. FSBCML No: 60-14. BL No. 60-2. Florida State Board of Conservation Marine Laboratory Maritime Base, Bayboro Harbor, St. Petersburg, FL.
    Summary: This report describes a proposed dredge and fill plan in the Featherbed Bank area.
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  • Yokel, B.J. (1973). A comparison of animal abundance and distribution in similar habitats in Rookery Bay, Marco Island, and Fakahatchee on the Southwest coast of Florida. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS-NCCOS 35.
    Summary:
    The three areas in Rookery Bay, near Marco Island and Fakahatchee Bay were sampled from July 1971 through July 1972, and 1,006,640 individual animals were collected, of which the majority (55%) came from the Marco area. The large disparity between the catches at Marco and the remaining study areas was due mainly to the appearance of high numbers of species of polychaetes and echinoderms that were of very minor importance or absent from the catches in Rookery Bay and Fakahatchee Bay. When only the major classes of animals in the catch are considered (i.e., crustaceans, fish and mollusks) the total counts for Fakahatchee (298,830) and Marco (275,075) are quite comparable but both exceed Rookery Bay (119,388) by a considerable margin. The effects of the red tide outbreak in the summer of 1971 were apparently restricted to the Rookery Bay Sanctuary and may account for some of the observed differences. For the purposes of making controlled comparisons between the study areas, three common habitats were selected in each area so that a mud bottom habitat, a sand-shell bottom habitat and a vegetated bottom habitat were located in each of the study areas. Total catches by habitat types for crustaceans, fish and mollusks and certain of the more abundant species show clearly the overwhelming importance of the vegetated bottom as a habitat for animals. By habitat the vegetated areas had the most "indicator species" with five, the mud habitat was next with three and the sand-shell habitat third with two. Thus the vegetated habitat would be the best choice if a single habitat were to be used to detect environmental changes between study areas..
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