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Action Plan:

  1. Locate unpublished documents and data related to the topics and geographical areas of interest by contacting organizations and individuals. Maintain a database of contacts made. Contacts include academia, federal, state and municipal governments, industry, and non-profit organizations and individuals. This work will be done by accredited librarians, technical information specialists and the senior scientist and will be ongoing.

  2. Maintain a database of found material including full bibliographic information (author, title, year, funding agency, pagination, key words, etc.), physical location of original material, and physical state of original (mimeograph, photocopy, etc.). All metadata will be NOAA Federal Geographic Data Committee format compatible. This work will be done by accredited librarians, technical information specialists and the senior scientist and will be ongoing.

  3. Evaluate amount and physical state of material, quality of data and/or text, and accompanying metadata (methodology, location, time, data quality parameters). This work will be done by the senior scientist.

  4. Establish priority for data or document restoration based on topic and geographical coverage, with special focus on data/documents relevant to SFERPM program. Information on data and documents related to other geographical areas or topics will added to the database for subsequent rescue by other efforts or organizations. Establishment of priorities will be done by the senior scientist.

    The primary topics of interest are: chemical measurements, physical measurements, assessment studies, contamination evaluation, anthropogenic damage, monitoring, restoration efforts and results, and dredging.

    The primary geographical areas of interest are: area of concern to the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force (Biscayne Bay, Florida Bay, Florida Keys, St. Lucie Estuary and Ten Thousand Islands); Dry Tortugas, Tampa Bay, and Apalachicola Bay.

    The primary coastal environments of interest are: estuaries, bays, mangrove forests, seagrasses, coral reefs, hurricanes, sedimentary processes, urban coastal development, and socioeconomic changes.

  5. Convert the data or document to editable electronic form using optical scanners. This work will be done by the technical information specialists and the senior scientist.

  6. Subject scanned material to quality assurance evaluation to eliminate errors caused by the scanning process, and to ascertain that text, figures, tables and metadata are complete. Edit as necessary scanned material as needed. This work will be done by the senior scientist.

  7. Publish resulting document through the Internet and catalog on the OCLC system. This work will be done by an accredited cataloger and the technical information specialists.

  8. Publish resulting document in printed form.

  9. Publicize the data and document rescue effort, and the availability of the restored documents at libraries, Internet sites, seminars, conferences. This effort will be done by all cooperating organizations to maximize effort and minimize cost.

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